Facebook Policy Primer Alexandra Malone
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Facebook Policy Primer Alexandra Malone

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Facebook Policy Primer

Facebook Policy Primer
for NET303 SP3 Curtin University
Assignment 2
by Alexandra Malone

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Facebook Policy Primer Alexandra Malone Facebook Policy Primer Alexandra Malone Presentation Transcript

  • Facebook Policy Primer Net303 Alexandra Malone
  • Are you guilty…
  • Of agreeing to terms and conditions without reading them first Are you guilty… ??
  • Well…you’re not the only one
  • People don’t read the terms of use because: Well…you’re not the only one
  • People don’t read the terms of use because: if they don’t agree, they won’t be able to use the service Well…you’re not the only one
  • People don’t read the terms of use because: if they don’t agree, they won’t be able to use the service it’s inconvenient Well…you’re not the only one
  • People don’t read the terms of use because: if they don’t agree, they won’t be able to use the service it’s inconvenient they have difficulty understanding the legal terminology Well…you’re not the only one
  • You should be aware exactly what you’re signing up for
  • Take Facebook for example
  • Their main purpose is to connect users in relation to their real world identities, and so they leave much of the responsibility of privacy protection to you as the user (Goettke & Christiana, 2007) Take Facebook for example
  • 14,000 Their terms of service are lengthy with over words which could take up to 2 hours to read (Smith, 2013) Take Facebook for example
  • Therefore…
  • I aim to summarise the important information in Facebook’s terms and policies to help you make informed decisions about how to use the platform. Therefore…
  • Consider your Privacy
  • Have a think about what you reveal Don’t just hand over large amounts of information about yourself to a relatively faceless organisation (Zittrain, 2008)
  • You grant us non-exclusive, transferable, “sub-licensable,aroyalty free, worldwide license “ to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (IP License) - https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms
  • You grant us non-exclusive, transferable, “sub-licensable,aroyalty free, worldwide license “ to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (IP License) - https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms This means Facebook has a licence to use content in any way it pleases. They can essentially transfer its rights over your content to any other company or organisation.
  • Technically…
  • They could use your profile picture on a billboard to promote themselves without paying a cent to you for the privilege Technically…
  • You should keep in mind…
  • That deleting your account does not necessarily remove all of your information. You should keep in mind…
  • That deleting your account does not necessarily remove all of your information. For example, if content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it, the conditions remain You should keep in mind…
  • All activity from groups messages and events will remain on other users’ accounts You should keep in mind…
  • Beware of Public Settings
  • When you publish content “ under the Public setting, it or information means you are “ allowing everyone, including people off of Facebook, to access and use that information - https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms
  • When you publish content “ under the Public setting, it or information means you are “ allowing everyone, including people off of Facebook, to access and use that information - https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms When others share information about you, they can also choose to make it public
  • Information that will includes: always be publicly available
  • Information that will includes: always be publicly available
  • Information that will includes: always be publicly available
  • Information that will includes: always be publicly available
  • Information that will includes: always be publicly available
  • Information that will includes: always be publicly available
  • Information that will includes: always be publicly available
  • Facebook also collects other information about you
  • Including: your activity (such as viewing another person’s timeline) data (such as the time, date or place you are viewing or posting content) the device you are using including your IP address, internet service and internet type
  • our “ We only provide data toyour advertising partners or customers after we have removed name or any other personally “ identifying information from it, or have combined it with other people's data in a way that it is no longer associated with you - https://www.facebook.com/about/privacy/your-info
  • rd party apps Beware of 3
  • When using an application you are accepting of service their terms rd party apps Beware of 3
  • When using an application you are accepting of service their terms And what’s more…. rd party apps Beware of 3
  • When using an application you are accepting of service their terms And what’s more…. your They can associate it with name, profile picture and any other information you’ve made available. rd party apps Beware of 3
  • Forbidden activities
  • Although Facebook claim to do their best to keep the platform safe, they do not guarantee it. Forbidden activities
  • Although Facebook claim to do their best to keep the platform safe, they do not guarantee it. Instead, they expect their users to adhere to certain commitments when using it. Forbidden activities
  • You will not: ► ► ► ► ► ► ► post unauthorised commercial communications such as spam automatically harvest user information without prior permission upload viruses or malicious code access others’ accounts bully, intimidate or harass other users post pornographic, threatening, violent or offensive material post anyone's identification documents or sensitive financial information on Facebook. ► infringe someone else's copyright Forbidden activities
  • In general, this means you will not use Facebook to do anything unlawful, misleading, malicious, or discriminatory Forbidden activities
  • Failure to comply with these regulations could result in the removal of your content or the suspension of your account
  • Protecting Minors
  • Under 13’s are not allowed to use Facebook Protecting minors
  • Appropriate age based restrictions need to be applied for those operating third-party applications if the content contains: ► ► ► ► Nudity Alcohol Dating Any other mature content Protecting minors
  • not use Facebook if you “ You willconvicted sex offender are a “ - https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms Protecting minors
  • Ultimately you use Facebook at your own risk
  • Ultimately you use Facebook at your own risk “ We do not guarantee that “ Facebook will always be safe, secure or error-free - https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms
  • All content for this policy primer was used under the Australian Copyright Act 1968 - Sect 41 "Fair dealing for purpose of criticism or review"
  • Facebook Brand Resources. (2013). “F” logo. [image]. Retrieved from https://www.facebookbrand.com/ Facebook Statement of Rights and Responsibilities. (2012). Retrieved from https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms Facebook Terms and Policies. (2012). Facebook Policies [image]. Retrieved from https://www.facebook.com/policies/ Goettke, R., & Christiana, J. (2007). Privacy and Online Social Networking Websites. Computer Science 199r: Special Topics in Computer Science Computation and Society: Privacy and Technology. Available: http://www.eecs.harvard.edu/cs199r/fp/RichJoe.pdf Information we receive about you. (2012). Retrieved from https://www.facebook.com/about/privacy/your-info References
  • Other websites and applications. (2012). Retrieved from https://www.facebook.com/about/privacy/your-info-on-other Smith, O. (2013, January 13). Facebook terms and conditions: why you don't own your online life. The Telegraph. Retrieved from ttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/socialmedia/9780565/Facebook-terms-and-conditions-why-you-dont-own-your-online-life.html Wikimedia Commons. (2012). Not Facebook Dislike thumbs down [image]. Retrieved from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ANot_facebook_dislike_thumbs_down.png Zittrain, J. (2008). The future of the Internet and how to stop it. New Haven: Yale University Press. References