• AGENDA
• MISSION STATEMENT:
– John F. Kennedy High School mission is to
develop our Island students to become
globally p...
• AGENDA
– Objective:
• To examine the major events leading up to the War of 1812.

• HANDOUTS ON CHAPTER 6
• CHAPTER 6 SECTION 4

Challenge to Neutrality
American merchant

Great Britain
I hate you,
French dude!
Je
vous
hais
plus!

You boys can
keep on killing
each other. If
...
Great Britain
• In 1803, Britain and
France went to war
again.
• Both countries
seized U.S. ships
sailing towards the
port...
• . British ships
impressed
(captured/ forced
to fight) US crew
members,
claiming they were
deserters from
Britain’s Royal...
I know what to do! If
we don’t allow
American ships to trade
with anyone, then they
won’t get attacked!
Mr. President,
Tru...
Embargo Act (1807)
• The Embargo Act banned U.S. ships from trading with any
country.
• All imports and exports
were banne...
The Embargo Act of 1813 is personified by a huge terrapin, who seizes a
smuggler by the pants. The cartoon was aimed at th...
War Hawks
War Hawks – members of Congress,
led by Henry Clay (want war with Britain)

34 year old Henry Clay, Speaker of t...
War Hawk’s Rationale for War
I. Nationalism – pride or devotion to
one’s country
II. Territorial Expansion
III. Want an en...
Election of 1808
• 4th President
• Democratic-Republican

• James Madison
Western Conflict
•

after independence, many poured into
the West
•
•

settlers ignored Indian rights and pushed
their way...
The Prophet and Tecumseh
• Tenskwatawa, also known as “The
Prophet”, - to survive, Native
Americans had to give up white
w...
• In 1808, the Prophet built a village for his followers in
Tippecanoe, Indiana.
Showdown at Tippecanoe
• In 1811, Native grew
and aided by Britain
• William Henry
Harrison led 1,000
troops against them ...
Madison re-elected

WAR of 1812
Madison asked Congress to go to war
with Britain
US believed it would be a short war since...
The U.S. declared war on Great Britain because
of their:

- impressment of U.S. sailors.
- violation of U.S. sea rights.
-...
In the War of
1812, the U.S.
captured and
burned the
Canadian city
of York.
Then US
found out
the France
LOST.
Now Britain...
In return, the
British marched
on Washington
D.C. They
burned the White
House, the
Capitol, and
other buildings.
Washington, D.C on
FIRE!

The city was completely
unprepared for the invaders,
but one woman took immediate
action. Even a...
The British took
Ft. McHenry
near Baltimore,
MD. They
bombarded the
fort with
cannonballs
fired from land
and nearby
ships...
Aboard the
British flagship was an
American
lawyer name
Francis
Francis did not sleep
that night as the
British guns pounded
Ft. McHenry. From
the deck of the
warship he could see
the fl...
The night gave way to
dawn.
For three day the
bombs bursting in air
Francis peered through
the haze and smoke.
When the ai...
• When the smoke cleared, “our flag was still there”.

• In response, Francis decided to write a poem
The Star-Spangled Banner

Francis Scott Key

O say can you see, by the
dawn's early light,
What so proudly we hail'd at
th...
The StarSpangled
Banner,
written in
Francis
Scott Key’s
own
handwriting.
(1840)
The original Star-Spangled Banner
The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History,
Washington, D.C.
Treaty of Ghent
• While it ended the war, the

•
•
•
•
•

treaty did not resolve any of the
problems between Britain and
t...
Battle of New Orleans
• Led by Gen. Andrew Jackson, the U.S. defeated the British
two weeks after the Treaty of Ghent was ...
Battle of New Orleans: Eyewitness Accounts
“Such a destruction of men, for the time it lasted, was never
before witnessed”...
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US CH4 War of 1812

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US CH4 War of 1812

  1. 1. • AGENDA • MISSION STATEMENT: – John F. Kennedy High School mission is to develop our Island students to become globally prime high achievers • ESLR’s – Responsible Citizen – Problem Solver – Effective Communicator – Technologically Literate
  2. 2. • AGENDA – Objective: • To examine the major events leading up to the War of 1812. • HANDOUTS ON CHAPTER 6
  3. 3. • CHAPTER 6 SECTION 4 Challenge to Neutrality
  4. 4. American merchant Great Britain I hate you, French dude! Je vous hais plus! You boys can keep on killing each other. If either of y’all need anything, just give us Yankees a holler! France
  5. 5. Great Britain • In 1803, Britain and France went to war again. • Both countries seized U.S. ships sailing towards the ports of their enemy. France
  6. 6. • . British ships impressed (captured/ forced to fight) US crew members, claiming they were deserters from Britain’s Royal Navy. They also confiscate cargos. Between 1808 and 1811 over 6,000 Americans were impressed by the British.
  7. 7. I know what to do! If we don’t allow American ships to trade with anyone, then they won’t get attacked! Mr. President, True, but the British and that’s not French keep seizing American what I had in merchant ships. mind! Something must be done! President Thomas Jefferson American merchant
  8. 8. Embargo Act (1807) • The Embargo Act banned U.S. ships from trading with any country. • All imports and exports were banned! • This hurt the U.S. economy more! Non-Intercourse Act (1809) • Trade with all nations was allowed EXCEPT Britain /France. • US became self-sufficient. Laid the groundwork for industrial power.
  9. 9. The Embargo Act of 1813 is personified by a huge terrapin, who seizes a smuggler by the pants. The cartoon was aimed at the people of New England, who, allegedly, were supplying the British with provisions.
  10. 10. War Hawks War Hawks – members of Congress, led by Henry Clay (want war with Britain) 34 year old Henry Clay, Speaker of the US House or Representative and War Hawk leader.
  11. 11. War Hawk’s Rationale for War I. Nationalism – pride or devotion to one’s country II. Territorial Expansion III. Want an end of British support to Natives
  12. 12. Election of 1808
  13. 13. • 4th President • Democratic-Republican • James Madison
  14. 14. Western Conflict • after independence, many poured into the West • • settlers ignored Indian rights and pushed their way in invalid treaties were negotiated » Indian faced lost of culture
  15. 15. The Prophet and Tecumseh • Tenskwatawa, also known as “The Prophet”, - to survive, Native Americans had to give up white ways of life. • Tecumseh wanted to unify all tribes and resist all further settlement and revive culture
  16. 16. • In 1808, the Prophet built a village for his followers in Tippecanoe, Indiana.
  17. 17. Showdown at Tippecanoe • In 1811, Native grew and aided by Britain • William Henry Harrison led 1,000 troops against them in the Battle of Tippecanoe Creek. William Henry Harrison, Territorial Governor of Indiana
  18. 18. Madison re-elected WAR of 1812 Madison asked Congress to go to war with Britain US believed it would be a short war since Britain was too busy fighting with France. It’s forces will be divided.
  19. 19. The U.S. declared war on Great Britain because of their: - impressment of U.S. sailors. - violation of U.S. sea rights. - support of Native Americans.
  20. 20. In the War of 1812, the U.S. captured and burned the Canadian city of York. Then US found out the France LOST. Now Britain can concentrate its forces toward US
  21. 21. In return, the British marched on Washington D.C. They burned the White House, the Capitol, and other buildings.
  22. 22. Washington, D.C on FIRE! The city was completely unprepared for the invaders, but one woman took immediate action. Even as people were fleeing the city in droves, First Lady Dolley Madison refused to leave without some of the nation's most important treasures-including the famous Gilbert Stuart portrait of George Washington.
  23. 23. The British took Ft. McHenry near Baltimore, MD. They bombarded the fort with cannonballs fired from land and nearby ships.
  24. 24. Aboard the British flagship was an American lawyer name Francis
  25. 25. Francis did not sleep that night as the British guns pounded Ft. McHenry. From the deck of the warship he could see the flash of guns firing away. Could the Americans hold out? During the night, Francis asked himself that question many times.
  26. 26. The night gave way to dawn. For three day the bombs bursting in air Francis peered through the haze and smoke. When the air cleared, he saw the stars and stripes were still there. The British had failed to capture Ft. McHenry.
  27. 27. • When the smoke cleared, “our flag was still there”. • In response, Francis decided to write a poem
  28. 28. The Star-Spangled Banner Francis Scott Key O say can you see, by the dawn's early light, What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming, Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight O'er the ramparts we watch'd were so gallantly streaming? (defensive barrier) And the rocket's red glare, the bomb bursting in air, Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there, O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?
  29. 29. The StarSpangled Banner, written in Francis Scott Key’s own handwriting. (1840)
  30. 30. The original Star-Spangled Banner The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, Washington, D.C.
  31. 31. Treaty of Ghent • While it ended the war, the • • • • • treaty did not resolve any of the problems between Britain and the U.S. Neither side gained muchreturned things the way it were set boundaries between US and Canada Fueled national pride and gained respect Considered victory: held its own against a major powerful nation Sealed the faith of US as an independent nation
  32. 32. Battle of New Orleans • Led by Gen. Andrew Jackson, the U.S. defeated the British two weeks after the Treaty of Ghent was signed. • Casualties: Britain – 2,030; U.S. – 7
  33. 33. Battle of New Orleans: Eyewitness Accounts “Such a destruction of men, for the time it lasted, was never before witnessed” - American Engineer Major Tatum Howell
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