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Designing with a_service_perspective_sharing
Designing with a_service_perspective_sharing
Designing with a_service_perspective_sharing
Designing with a_service_perspective_sharing
Designing with a_service_perspective_sharing
Designing with a_service_perspective_sharing
Designing with a_service_perspective_sharing
Designing with a_service_perspective_sharing
Designing with a_service_perspective_sharing
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Designing with a_service_perspective_sharing

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Designing with a Service Perspective: A Bronx Tale - Presented at UPA 2011

Designing with a Service Perspective: A Bronx Tale - Presented at UPA 2011

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  • Service UPA conference – value exchange – intangibleWithout service provider/customer, service doesn’t happenCo createdDifferent than UX: holistically and not user-centeredI want to first talk about what a service means Let’s think about this UPA conference as a service You pay a fee in exchange for the opportunity to hear case studies, become educated on new trends and topics and network But there is no product or commodity involved: in essence, the UPA is the provider of knowledge sharing and networking services to you, the customer What goes into this service? Awareness of it happening, assessing interests, committing and registering, checking in, and participating in the discussion/event itself What is a key differentiator of a service vs. a product is that without both the service provider (the person who received your registration, the person checking you in, the presenters, the facilitators) AND the customer (you), the service doesn’t happen Similar to that old question: if a tree falls in a forest does it make a sound... If you don’t register, attend, etc. then the service inherently doesn’t happen... I can be standing here with no one in the audience, and the service didn’t happen because there was no one there in the value exchange. So implicitly a service is a co-created experience (vs. a product/commodity where it doesn’t matter if a basketball is used, it still was purchased and exists) and it’s this co-created aspect of services that is important to remember
  • Service UPA conference – value exchange – intangibleWithout service provider/customer, service doesn’t happenCo createdDifferent than UX: holistically and not user-centeredI want to first talk about what a service means Let’s think about this UPA conference as a service You pay a fee in exchange for the opportunity to hear case studies, become educated on new trends and topics and network But there is no product or commodity involved: in essence, the UPA is the provider of knowledge sharing and networking services to you, the customer What goes into this service? Awareness of it happening, assessing interests, committing and registering, checking in, and participating in the discussion/event itself What is a key differentiator of a service vs. a product is that without both the service provider (the person who received your registration, the person checking you in, the presenters, the facilitators) AND the customer (you), the service doesn’t happen Similar to that old question: if a tree falls in a forest does it make a sound... If you don’t register, attend, etc. then the service inherently doesn’t happen... I can be standing here with no one in the audience, and the service didn’t happen because there was no one there in the value exchange. So implicitly a service is a co-created experience (vs. a product/commodity where it doesn’t matter if a basketball is used, it still was purchased and exists) and it’s this co-created aspect of services that is important to remember
  • Understand BGC, people, usesObservations: noticed variety of people involved and usesNot just residentsBGC as service provider, customers and backofficeProposal was to figure out diverse people their needs and aspirations– or who are the various people served by the BGC and who provide service through the BGC and what service exp do they wantThink about your own city/town200 entrants – 25 countries, 35 and then 71000 bucks to explore/createTo inform our proposal, we wanted to learn more about the BGC, the people and how they use it. So we conducted observations along the concourse in key locations and we noticed the variety of users: truck drivers, artists, shop owners, government officials and uses (education, healthcare) Our assumption had been that we’d focus on the people who lived along the BGC and consider their experience. But by considering the BGC as being a service provider, we need to think about the various ‘customers’ (not just the residents) and the ‘backoffice’ people of the city So our proposal, ultimately, was that the vision for the BGC needs to focus on figuring out who the diverse people who use the BGC are, and what they need and aspire for the BGC – or said another way – who are the various customers served by the BGC and what type of service experience do they want Think about that for yourself – wouldn’t you love if your city/town asked you to help them determine how they could better serve you? What happened: out of 200 entrants from 25 countries, we made it to the final cut of 35 and then the top 7. We were given a thousand dollars to explore our proposal further and prepare an exhibit for the bronx art museum where the jury would pick the winner
  • Understand BGC, people, usesObservations: noticed variety of people involved and usesNot just residentsBGC as service provider, customers and backofficeProposal was to figure out diverse people their needs and aspirations– or who are the various people served by the BGC and who provide service through the BGC and what service exp do they wantThink about your own city/town200 entrants – 25 countries, 35 and then 71000 bucks to explore/createTo inform our proposal, we wanted to learn more about the BGC, the people and how they use it. So we conducted observations along the concourse in key locations and we noticed the variety of users: truck drivers, artists, shop owners, government officials and uses (education, healthcare) Our assumption had been that we’d focus on the people who lived along the BGC and consider their experience. But by considering the BGC as being a service provider, we need to think about the various ‘customers’ (not just the residents) and the ‘backoffice’ people of the city So our proposal, ultimately, was that the vision for the BGC needs to focus on figuring out who the diverse people who use the BGC are, and what they need and aspire for the BGC – or said another way – who are the various customers served by the BGC and what type of service experience do they want Think about that for yourself – wouldn’t you love if your city/town asked you to help them determine how they could better serve you? What happened: out of 200 entrants from 25 countries, we made it to the final cut of 35 and then the top 7. We were given a thousand dollars to explore our proposal further and prepare an exhibit for the bronx art museum where the jury would pick the winner
  • Spoke to over 130 people and did interviews/surveysPrioritization exerciseMet with key people:Prof. of African American StudiesArtistsUrban Planner and Education Policy Director: Bronx Borough Pres. OfficeCo-Founder and CEO: WHEDCoConcourse ‘Uber’ ResidentsAuthorTeen Arts council membersNow we actually had to fulfill what we said we would of exploring the needs of the diverse communities. We spoke to over 135 people at key areas and asked questions like Why are you here today? How often and for how long do you come to the BGC? What do you like about it? What don’t you like? What is one word to describe the Concourse? What are your skills & interests? What communities do you identify with? We had them complete a prioritization exercise to understand what they’d like to see more of. We also met with key people who represented the various entities involved in the BGC service, customer and backoffice:
  • Co-createdVarious pieces in the museum – posteresNeeded the city to view items as inter-related, system of interrelated issuesSo what did we find out: go through bullets... Co-created We had several pieces in the Museum; videos of the interviews, an interactive display of the insight, a survey, but these were what we feel are best to show the insights. I have posters for you to look at if you weren’t able to yesterday during the poster session, but I think the core theme we wanted to communicate was that improving one facet of the Concourse has implications to others. We wanted to encourage the City to view these items as inter-related, so if you want to improve the lighting to help people feel more secure and perhaps decrease crime, there are environmental relationships – good or bad - to that. Too often cities make changes without thinking through the impact, and because thinking of the BGC as a service to its customers means you need to think holistically and as a system, we felt this visual was important.Did we win?Stopped being a competition – we became part of the cityWith all of these amazing insights and artifacts, did we win? No. What won was something called PUMP which helps filter the air and water associated with the BGC for use elsewhere in the bronx. What’s interesting is that while we didn’t expect to win, the competition really stopped being a competition. Just how people of a city and those who represent the city itself and (eg, government) co-create the service experience and ‘service customers’ are as responsible for their service experience in the city as the city is itself, we began to feel as though we were a participant in this service exchange, wanting to ensure something happen to our recommendations. An awesome collaboration activity would have been us working with these other firms/participants to ensure some of the key elements – like safety – could have been part of their designs.
  • Transcript

    1. Designing with a Service Perspective: A Bronx TaleLaura Keller<br />6.23.11<br />
    2. Communications/content<br />Customer-facing volunteer (front-office)<br />Wayfinding information<br />Queue location<br />
    3. Planning and orchestrating…<br />People<br />Infrastructure<br />Time<br />Objects<br />Space<br />Processes<br />Information<br />Technology<br />Communications<br />… to create an effective service experience<br />
    4. City = Service<br />
    5. City = Service<br />Re-vision-ing the Bronx Grand Concourse:A Community-Centered Approach<br />
    6. <ul><li>A strong sense of community exists: People, Diversity, Friendliness.
    7. People have a desire to be proud of the Concourse and see its potential.
    8. Missed opportunities to make people proud with perceived neglect leading to apathy.
    9. People want to participate in the Concourse's future.
    10. A vital future depends on a healthy present: meet basic needs first.</li></li></ul><li>Applying a Service Perspective for Impact<br />Reframe design problems as service opportunities <br />Understand all experiential elements in concert<br />Focus less on being user-centered; co-creation is critical<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />Planning and orchestrating <what>…? to create an effective <what> service experience<br />
    11. http://www.misicompany.com/Bronx-Grand-Concourse/<br />http://grandconcourse100.org/<br />laura@laurakeller.net<br />@ServiceDesignLK<br />http://www.quora.com/Laura-Keller<br />UXmatters.com<br />Danke!<br />

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