Designing Services

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A quick overview of service design by Nick Marsh of Engine service design. What is service design? Why is it? Where's it going next?
Delivered at HyperIsland, Stockholm, September 2007

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  • Designing Services

    1. 1. Talk and workshop, HyperIsland, Stockholm, 2007 Nick Marsh, Engine Service Design www.enginegroup.co.uk Designing Services
    2. 2. <ul><li>What is service design? </li></ul><ul><li>Why design services? And why now? </li></ul><ul><li>What makes a good service (design)? </li></ul><ul><li>What makes a good service designer? </li></ul><ul><li>What’s next for service design? </li></ul><ul><li>Break </li></ul><ul><li>Exercise: MyMetrics - Developing service centred tools to measure and improve experiences </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Service design consultancy based in London </li></ul><ul><li>Founded in 2000 </li></ul><ul><li>14 people with diverse backgrounds in product design, communications design, interaction design, management consulting, strategy and planning, ethnographic research and more. </li></ul><ul><li>Wide range of high profile clients in the private and public sector </li></ul>
    4. 5. What is Service Design?
    5. 6. A new design discipline? A set of methodologies? A new way of thinking? Anything new at all?
    6. 7. What is design? What is Design?
    7. 8. Design is the process of making something better for someone.
    8. 9. <ul><li>Design is the process of making something better for someone, in which is contained a series of shared practices, methods and tools for doing this making . </li></ul><ul><li>Some practices, tools and methods can be shared between the designers following the process of making different types of (some)thing, others can’t. </li></ul><ul><li>Service design borrows tools and methods from all design disciplines, and it has some of its own. </li></ul>
    9. 10. All design is multi-disciplinary product design
    10. 11. All design is multi-disciplinary interaction design
    11. 12. Service design is the same, it’s just very multi disciplinary (because services are) service design
    12. 13. <ul><li>Scope of service design projects at Engine: </li></ul><ul><li>Service innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Design research </li></ul><ul><li>Business planning </li></ul><ul><li>Service production </li></ul><ul><li>Service specification </li></ul>
    13. 14. 1. Service Innovation New propositions and enhancements
    14. 15. 1. Service Innovation New propositions and enhancements
    15. 16. 1. Service Innovation New propositions and enhancements
    16. 17. 2. Design research Insight, stimulus and direction
    17. 18. 2. Design research Insight, stimulus and direction
    18. 19. 2. Design research Insight, stimulus and direction
    19. 20. 3. Business Planning Visual business cases and buy-in
    20. 21. 3. Business Planning Visual business cases and buy-in
    21. 22. 4. Service Production Training, choreography, measurement
    22. 23. 4. Service Production Training, choreography, measurement
    23. 24. 5. Service Specification Service requirements Principles Guidelines Messages Metrics Processes Business models
    24. 25. Service design is a very multidisciplinary practice We’ll look at what’s needed to be a good service designer later. Before that, why is service design emerging now ?
    25. 26. Why Service Design?
    26. 27. <ul><li>74% of UK GDP comes from service </li></ul><ul><li>80% of employment is service related </li></ul><ul><li>Happy customers are worth more </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Service’ counteracts commoditisation </li></ul><ul><li>Service relationships can’t be copied </li></ul><ul><li>Yet… </li></ul><ul><li>81% of people report bad experiences </li></ul>
    27. 28. The service economy is here, but it’s just not very well designed yet!
    28. 29. The cultural and social challenges driving service design
    29. 30. The world has become flatter
    30. 31. The world has become fuller
    31. 32. The world has become richer
    32. 33. The world has become busier
    33. 34. The world has become older
    34. 35. The world has become more competitive
    35. 36. The world has become more confusing
    36. 37. More competition + More choice + More cash = More complexity Fortunately, designers have a process for making things better!
    37. 38. The commercial challenges driving service design
    38. 39. <ul><li>‘ Servitisation’ </li></ul><ul><li>New business models </li></ul><ul><li>New relationships with customers </li></ul><ul><li>New relationships with competitors </li></ul><ul><li>New opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>New complexities </li></ul>
    39. 43. Service innovation is the new corporate battleground Graph: © Peer insight LLC
    40. 44. The Progression of Economic Value Source: Pine and Gilmore, ‘The Experience Economy’ Specific Different and Unique Low Market Value High Undifferentiated Generic Diversity Customer Need extract commodities make goods deliver services provide experiences
    41. 45. The Progression of Economic Value Source: Pine and Gilmore, ‘The Experience Economy’ Specific Different and Unique Low Market Value High Undifferentiated Generic Diversity Customer Need
    42. 46. We need service design, as providers and users (and ambitious designers!) But what is a good service (design)?
    43. 47. What makes a good service (design)?
    44. 48. Convenient Usable Desirable Consistent Efficient Effective Sustainable
    45. 49. Sustainable Usable Convenient Consistent Efficient Effective Desirable SUCCEED! }
    46. 50. Good service design exists in a ‘translation space’.
    47. 51. Five Fundamentals of service design
    48. 53. Systems Understanding that services are consumed through systems of relationships between people, things and processes, which can all be orchestrated and innovated
    49. 54. Value Understanding how to create the best value for users and providers through their interactions.
    50. 55. People Understanding the part people play in providing, using and designing services, and how to include them in the service design process .
    51. 56. Journeys Understanding that services are experienced over time and need to be seen and innovated as journeys
    52. 57. Propositions Understanding how to innovate, package and market a service and how to develop a proposition towards a vision.
    53. 58. Process Service design made simple…
    54. 59. What makes a good service designer?
    55. 61. A passion for Process
    56. 62. Co-creation
    57. 63. Facilitation
    58. 64. Empathy
    59. 65. Understanding that the craft is in letting go, not holding on
    60. 66. Visualisation and communication
    61. 67. User centred design research
    62. 68. Prototyping
    63. 69. Making tools for others
    64. 70. Managing ambiguity
    65. 71. Making things simple
    66. 72. Making things (appear) simple
    67. 74. Very multi disciplinary design - Bridge shaped?
    68. 76. Where next for service design?
    69. 77. <ul><li>Exciting times for designers! </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity is the new competitiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Service design is ambitious for design, and the potential of design to improve our lives </li></ul><ul><li>As a very multi disciplinary practice, service design can grow in three main directions </li></ul>
    70. 78. <ul><li>1. The very multi disciplinary studio </li></ul><ul><li>Service designers continue to expand their generalist skills, with increasing emphasis on co-design and co-innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Works well for smaller, quicker projects, in particular innovation focused work where designers are researchers (or vice versa) </li></ul><ul><li>Will be supported by new entrants from management and marketing fields </li></ul><ul><li>Current Engine strategy </li></ul>
    71. 79. <ul><li>2. The deeply multi disciplinary studio </li></ul><ul><li>Service designers become project co-ordinators for large scale new service development programs, acting more like architects </li></ul><ul><li>Supported by larger teams of more specialised multi-disciplinary teams - Service design becomes about (big!) brief building (like IDEO) </li></ul><ul><li>Improves the role (and use) of design at the heart of the service enterprise, particularly in consumer markets </li></ul>
    72. 80. <ul><li>3. The specialist studio </li></ul><ul><li>Its also likely that specialist service design studios (and designers) will emerge that focus on one area of service design and innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Already underway in the public sector, with studios such as ThinkPublic that looks only at health services </li></ul>
    73. 81. Challenges ahead <ul><li>Developing common language </li></ul><ul><li>Improving service design education </li></ul>
    74. 82. Building Common Language A new language for clients A new language for designers
    75. 83. http://www.enginegroup.co.uk/source/stories/journey_to_the_interface.html
    76. 84. Service design education New skills New competition
    77. 85. www.enginegroup.co.uk Talk and workshop, HyperIsland, Stockholm, 2007 Nick Marsh, Engine Service Design

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