by John Paul Mueller and Debbie WalkowskiMicrosoft®OfficeVisio®2007FORDUMmIES‰
Visio®2007 For Dummies®Published byWiley Publishing, Inc.111 River StreetHoboken, NJ 07030-5774www.wiley.comCopyright © 20...
About the AuthorsJohn Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in hisblood, having produced 70 b...
DedicationThis book is dedicated to those purveyors of the medicinal latte, Muhammadand Marilyn Kharbush.Author’s Acknowle...
Publisher’s AcknowledgmentsWe’re proud of this book; please send us your comments through our online registration formloca...
Contents at a GlanceIntroduction .................................................................1Part I: Starting with V...
Table of ContentsIntroduction..................................................................1About This Book..............
Chapter 2: Creating and Saving a Simple Visio Drawing . . . . . . . . . . .29Creating a Drawing the Standard Way.............
Part II: Creating Visio Drawings ...................................89Chapter 4: Discovering What Visio Shapes Are All Abo...
Chapter 6: Connecting Shapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145Discovering Connectors........
Drawing Your Own Shapes..........................................................................200Drawing with the Line ...
Chapter 10: Layering Your Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249Getting the Essential Facts on ...
Chapter 13: Marking Up Drawings for Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .313Discovering Markup Tools ...................
Creating and Adding a Background Design to a Drawing .......................361Adjusting the Transparency of Shapes and Te...
IntroductionVisio is one of the most flexible and easy-to-use drawing products around.Yet, its ease of use doesn’t mean th...
With this in mind, Visio 2007 For Dummies is designed to make you produc-tive as quickly as possible. You find basic, usef...
through Part III for any features that you might find useful and have the timeto work through. Also, glance through Part V...
Part II: Creating Visio DrawingsPart II is for those in a hurry because it teaches you the basics of creating asimple draw...
About the Web SiteThis book contains a wealth of drawing examples, a few themes, some sten-cils, and other helpful Visio d...
Where to Go from HereIf you’ve never used Visio before, definitely start with Part I! Work your waythrough Part II as well...
Part IStarting withVisio 2007 Basics
In this part . . .Visio is an amazing program! If you can imagine it, youcan probably sketch it using Visio. Many people u...
Chapter 1Visio101In This Chapterᮣ Getting the scoop on Visio featuresᮣ Understanding the lingo of Visioᮣ Opening Visio and...
Visio’s grab bag of icons — or shapes, as Visio calls them — represents allsorts of things from computer network component...
is the edition to use because it provides all the shapes and symbols you needto create simple or complex diagrams. If you’...
you see only the layer of data you actually need. All of the data is stillthere, but you only access it when you actually ...
What’s new in Visio 2007?Visio 2007 has a lot to offer. With each update, Visio improves the functional-ity you need to cr...
ߜ Improving efficiency with smaller diagrams: Other people don’t alwaysneed every piece of information in a diagram. For e...
Familiarizing Yourself with Visio LingoLike all software programs, Visio uses a particular terminology. You need tobe fami...
Understanding the Vista DifferenceVisio operates a little differently from a visual and security perspective underVista th...
You may have run into problems accessing information on international Websites in the past. Vista now supports the special...
Digitally signing your macrosYou’ll probably find that those macros you relied on in previous versions ofVisio no longer w...
Visio divides the application functionality into several areas. At the top arethe toolbars and menus you use when working ...
sample. To use the sample, select the US Units or Metric option, andclick Open Sample Data.ߜ Category: The Category list s...
The display contains the same menu, Standard toolbar, and Formatting tool-bar as before, but the entries are active now. T...
Working with toolbarsVisio has a dozen or so toolbars, two of which are displayed automaticallywhen you start the program....
All Visio toolbars can be docked at different locations on the screen. Just grabthe vertical bar at the left end of any to...
Modifying a toolbarIf you just want to add a button here or there, consider modifying an existingtoolbar rather than creat...
2. Right-click the toolbar and choose Customize.Visio displays the Customize dialog box.3. Drag the button that you want t...
If you don’t see the help you want, type a search term in the Type Words toSearch For field and click Search. For example,...
Closing VisioWhen you’re ready to close Visio, choose File➪Exit. If you haven’t recentlysaved all open files, Visio prompt...
28 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
Chapter 2CreatingandSavingaSimpleVisioDrawingIn This Chapterᮣ Creating a drawingᮣ Discovering the Visio drawing typesᮣ Ope...
1. Choose Start➪Programs➪Microsoft Office➪Microsoft Office Visio2007 if Visio isn’t already running.You see the opening Vi...
After you answer any configuration questions, Visio displays the shapeon-screen. Figure 2-3 shows a typical example of a c...
Understanding the VisioDrawing CategoriesVisio provides a vast array of templates, and you can download more tem-plates as...
If you regularly work with Active Directory, you might want to check outWindows Server 2003 For Dummies, by Ed Tittle and ...
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Transcript of "Wiley 2007- microsoft office visio 2007 for dummies"

  1. 1. by John Paul Mueller and Debbie WalkowskiMicrosoft®OfficeVisio®2007FORDUMmIES‰
  2. 2. Visio®2007 For Dummies®Published byWiley Publishing, Inc.111 River StreetHoboken, NJ 07030-5774www.wiley.comCopyright © 2007 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, IndianaPublished by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, IndianaPublished simultaneously in CanadaNo part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form orby any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except as permit-ted under Sections 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior writtenpermission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to theCopyright Clearance Center, 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, (978) 750-8400, fax (978) 646-8600.Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Legal Department, Wiley Publishing,Inc., 10475 Crosspoint Blvd., Indianapolis, IN 46256, (317) 572-3447, fax (317) 572-4355, or online athttp://www.wiley.com/go/permissions.Trademarks: Wiley, the Wiley Publishing logo, For Dummies, the Dummies Man logo, A Reference for theRest of Us!, The Dummies Way, Dummies Daily, The Fun and Easy Way, Dummies.com, and related tradedress are trademarks or registered trademarks of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the UnitedStates and other countries, and may not be used without written permission. Visio is a registered trade-mark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are theproperty of their respective owners. Wiley Publishing, Inc., is not associated with any product or vendormentioned in this book.LIMIT OF LIABILITY/DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTY: THE PUBLISHER AND THE AUTHOR MAKE NO REP-RESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ACCURACY OR COMPLETENESS OF THECONTENTS OF THIS WORK AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WITHOUTLIMITATION WARRANTIES OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. NO WARRANTY MAY BE CRE-ATED OR EXTENDED BY SALES OR PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS. THE ADVICE AND STRATEGIES CON-TAINED HEREIN MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR EVERY SITUATION. THIS WORK IS SOLD WITH THEUNDERSTANDING THAT THE PUBLISHER IS NOT ENGAGED IN RENDERING LEGAL, ACCOUNTING, OROTHER PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. IF PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANCE IS REQUIRED, THE SERVICES OF ACOMPETENT PROFESSIONAL PERSON SHOULD BE SOUGHT. NEITHER THE PUBLISHER NOR THEAUTHOR SHALL BE LIABLE FOR DAMAGES ARISING HEREFROM. THE FACT THAT AN ORGANIZATIONOR WEBSITE IS REFERRED TO IN THIS WORK AS A CITATION AND/OR A POTENTIAL SOURCE OF FUR-THER INFORMATION DOES NOT MEAN THAT THE AUTHOR OR THE PUBLISHER ENDORSES THEINFORMATION THE ORGANIZATION OR WEBSITE MAY PROVIDE OR RECOMMENDATIONS IT MAYMAKE. FURTHER, READERS SHOULD BE AWARE THAT INTERNET WEBSITES LISTED IN THIS WORKMAY HAVE CHANGED OR DISAPPEARED BETWEEN WHEN THIS WORK WAS WRITTEN AND WHEN ITIS READ.For general information on our other products and services, please contact our Customer CareDepartment within the U.S. at 800-762-2974, outside the U.S. at 317-572-3993, or fax 317-572-4002.For technical support, please visit www.wiley.com/techsupport.Wiley also publishes its books in a variety of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print maynot be available in electronic books.Library of Congress Control Number: 2006934833ISBN-13: 978-0-470-08983-5ISBN-10: 0-470-08983-0Manufactured in the United States of America10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 11B/SY/RR/QW/IN
  3. 3. About the AuthorsJohn Mueller is a freelance author and technical editor. He has writing in hisblood, having produced 70 books and over 300 articles to date. The topicsrange from networking to artificial intelligence and from database manage-ment to heads-down programming. Some of his current books include aWindows power optimization book, a book on .NET security, and books onAmazon Web Services, Google Web Services, and eBay Web Services. Histechnical editing skills have helped more than 51 authors refine the contentof their manuscripts. John has provided technical editing services to bothData Based Advisor and Coast Compute magazines. He’s also contributed arti-cles to magazines like DevSource, InformIT, Informant, DevX, SQL ServerProfessional, Visual C++ Developer, Hard Core Visual Basic, asp.netPRO,Software Test and Performance, and Visual Basic Developer.When John isn’t working at the computer, you can find him in his workshop.He’s an avid woodworker and candle maker. On any given afternoon, you canfind him working at a lathe or putting the finishing touches on a bookcase. Healso likes making glycerin soap and candles, which comes in handy for giftbaskets. You can reach John on the Internet at JMueller@mwt.net. John isalso setting up a Web site at http://www.mwt.net/~jmueller/; feel free tolook and make suggestions on how he can improve it. Check out his weeklyblog at http://www.amazon.com/gp/blog/id/AQOA2QP4X1YWP.Debbie Walkowski has worked in the computer industry for more than 20years in a variety of positions from sales and marketing to teaching and train-ing. For the last 14 years, she has made writing her primary focus. Her com-pany, the Writing Works, specializes in writing computer self-help books andproviding writing services to companies such as Microsoft Corporation,Hewlett-Packard (formerly Digital Equipment Corporation), and AT&TWireless Communications. She has authored 18 books on popular computersoftware, including Microsoft Office, Microsoft Works, Microsoft PowerPoint,Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Project, Microsoft Windows, Visio, Quicken,WordPerfect, and Lotus 1-2-3.
  4. 4. DedicationThis book is dedicated to those purveyors of the medicinal latte, Muhammadand Marilyn Kharbush.Author’s AcknowledgmentsFrom John Mueller: Thanks to my wife, Rebecca, for working with me to getthis book completed. I really don’t know what I would have done without herhelp in researching and compiling some of the information that appears inthis book. She also did a fine job of proofreading my rough draft and page-proofing the result. She also had to do without my help in the garden thissummer, which made things mighty tough on her.Russ Mullen deserves thanks for his technical edit of this book. He greatlyadded to the accuracy and depth of the material you see here. Russ is alwaysproviding me with great URLs for new products and ideas. I really appreci-ated Russ’ input on several of the new Visio 2007 features. They were helpfulin rounding out the information you find in this book.Matt Wagner, my agent, deserves credit for helping me get the contract in thefirst place and taking care of all the details that most authors don’t really con-sider. I always appreciate his assistance. It’s good to know that someonewants to help.A number of people read all or part of this book to help me refine theapproach, test the examples, and generally provide input that every readerwishes they could have. These unpaid volunteers helped in ways too numer-ous to mention here. I especially appreciate the efforts of Eva Beattie whoread the entire book and selflessly devoted herself to this project. Membersof various newsgroups and the support staff from Microsoft were instrumen-tal in helping me overcome obstacles. A number of other people helped me inways too numerous to mention.Finally, I would like to thank Kyle Looper, Nicole Sholly, John Edwards,Jennifer Theriot, and the rest of the editorial and production staff for theirassistance in bringing this book to print. It’s always nice to work with such agreat group of professionals.
  5. 5. Publisher’s AcknowledgmentsWe’re proud of this book; please send us your comments through our online registration formlocated at www.dummies.com/register/.Some of the people who helped bring this book to market include the following:Acquisitions, Editorial, andMedia DevelopmentProject Editor: Nicole ShollyAcquisitions Editor: Kyle LooperCopy Editor: John EdwardsTechnical Editor: Russ MullenEditorial Manager: Kevin KirschnerMedia Development Specialists: Angela Denny,Kate Jenkins, Steven Kudirka, Kit MaloneMedia Development Coordinator:Laura AtkinsonMedia Project Supervisor: Laura MossMedia Development Manager:Laura VanWinkleEditorial Assistant: Amanda FoxworthSr. Editorial Assistant: Cherie CaseCartoons: Rich Tennant (www.the5thwave.com)Composition ServicesProject Coordinator: Erin SmithLayout and Graphics: Lavonne Cook,Stephanie D. Jumper, Clint Lahnen,Barbara Moore, Barry Offringa,Lynsey Osborn, Heather Ryan,Julie TrippettiProofreaders: Kevin Broccoli, Jessica Kramer,Christy PingletonIndexer: TechbooksPublishing and Editorial for Technology DummiesRichard Swadley, Vice President and Executive Group PublisherAndy Cummings, Vice President and PublisherMary Bednarek, Executive Acquisitions DirectorMary C. Corder, Editorial DirectorPublishing for Consumer DummiesDiane Graves Steele, Vice President and PublisherJoyce Pepple, Acquisitions DirectorComposition ServicesGerry Fahey, Vice President of Production ServicesDebbie Stailey, Director of Composition Services
  6. 6. Contents at a GlanceIntroduction .................................................................1Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics..........................7Chapter 1: Visio 101 ...........................................................................................................9Chapter 2: Creating and Saving a Simple Visio Drawing..............................................29Chapter 3: Printing Visio Drawings ................................................................................69Part II: Creating Visio Drawings ..................................89Chapter 4: Discovering What Visio Shapes Are All About ..........................................91Chapter 5: Adding Text to Your Drawings...................................................................119Chapter 6: Connecting Shapes......................................................................................145Part III: Taking Your Drawings to the Next Level.........167Chapter 7: Perfecting Your Drawings...........................................................................169Chapter 8: Creating and Customizing Shapes.............................................................191Chapter 9: Working with Pages.....................................................................................227Chapter 10: Layering Your Drawings ...........................................................................249Part IV: Advancing Your Knowledge of Visio...............265Chapter 11: Creating Stencils, Master Shapes, and Templates ................................267Chapter 12: Managing Shape Information, Behavior, and Protection......................281Chapter 13: Marking Up Drawings for Review............................................................313Chapter 14: Using Visio with Other Programs............................................................329Part V: The Part of Tens ............................................357Chapter 15: Ten Common Tasks in Visio.....................................................................359Chapter 16: Ten Web Sites Devoted to Visio...............................................................365Index .......................................................................371
  7. 7. Table of ContentsIntroduction..................................................................1About This Book...............................................................................................1Conventions Used in This Book .....................................................................2What You’re Not to Read.................................................................................2Foolish Assumptions .......................................................................................3How This Book Is Organized...........................................................................3Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics .................................................3Part II: Creating Visio Drawings............................................................4Part III: Taking Your Drawings to the Next Level................................4Part IV: Advancing Your Knowledge of Visio ......................................4Part V: The Part of Tens.........................................................................4About the Web Site.................................................................................5Icons Used in This Book..................................................................................5Where to Go from Here....................................................................................6Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics...........................7Chapter 1: Visio 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9Getting the Scoop on Visio..............................................................................9Comparing Visio products ..................................................................10A quick peek at some Visio features ..................................................11What’s new in Visio 2007? ...................................................................13Familiarizing Yourself with Visio Lingo .......................................................15Understanding the Vista Difference.............................................................16The graphical interface difference .....................................................16Helpful user interface changes ...........................................................16Understanding the security features .................................................17Jumping Head First into Visio.......................................................................18Getting familiar with the Visio screen................................................20Checking out the menus......................................................................21Working with toolbars .........................................................................22Getting Help When You Need It....................................................................25Using general help................................................................................25Don’t forget ToolTips ...........................................................................26Closing Visio ...................................................................................................27
  8. 8. Chapter 2: Creating and Saving a Simple Visio Drawing . . . . . . . . . . .29Creating a Drawing the Standard Way.........................................................29Understanding the Visio Drawing Categories.............................................32Working with Stencils ....................................................................................53Moving and arranging stencils ...........................................................53Closing stencils.....................................................................................54Opening additional stencils ................................................................54Selecting a Pointer Tool Button....................................................................56Working with Shapes .....................................................................................56Adding a shape to a drawing ..............................................................57Selecting a shape..................................................................................57Selecting more than one shape at a time ..........................................58Navigating through a Drawing......................................................................59Zeroing In on a Drawing ................................................................................60Using the Zoom button........................................................................60Using the Pan & Zoom window...........................................................61Using Drawing Explorer.......................................................................62Saving Drawings .............................................................................................64Saving a drawing the first time ...........................................................64Setting up AutoSave .............................................................................64Saving a drawing as a template ..........................................................66Saving a drawing in another file format.............................................66Using a Visio Wizard to Create a Drawing...................................................67Opening Drawings..........................................................................................67Chapter 3: Printing Visio Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69Understanding How Visio Prints..................................................................69Preparing to Print...........................................................................................70Checking the printer paper and drawing page sizes .......................70Previewing your drawing.....................................................................73A clear view in Print Preview..............................................................74Printing Your Drawing ...................................................................................76Adding Headers and Footers to a Drawing.................................................77Printing Gridlines ...........................................................................................80Printing Part of a Drawing.............................................................................80Reducing and Enlarging Printed Drawings .................................................81Altering the print scale of a drawing .................................................81Printing oversized drawings ...............................................................82Using online printing services............................................................83Printing to scale....................................................................................84Setting Shapes Not to Print...........................................................................85Printing Reviewers’ Comments ....................................................................86Printing a Background Separately................................................................87Printing Layers Separately............................................................................88Visio 2007 For Dummiesx
  9. 9. Part II: Creating Visio Drawings ...................................89Chapter 4: Discovering What Visio Shapes Are All About . . . . . . . . .91Discovering What’s in a Shape .....................................................................92Examining open and closed shapes...................................................93Comparing one- and two-dimensional shapes..................................94Displaying all of the shape handles ...................................................95Working with Shapes .....................................................................................96Moving shapes......................................................................................97Nudging shapes ....................................................................................98Copying and pasting shapes ...............................................................98Sizing up your shapes..........................................................................99Deleting shapes ..................................................................................101Controlling Shapes.......................................................................................101Adjusting shapes using control handles .........................................103Adjusting shapes using control points............................................105Shaping corners..................................................................................106Rotating shapes into place................................................................107Modifying arcs using eccentricity handles .....................................107Using connection points....................................................................108Using automatic connection points .................................................110Finding the Shapes You Want .....................................................................111Jazzing Up Your Drawings...........................................................................113Loading stencils from other templates............................................114Using the Visio Extras stencil shapes..............................................114Using themes.......................................................................................115Chapter 5: Adding Text to Your Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119Understanding Text Blocks.........................................................................119Adding Text to a Drawing............................................................................120Working with Text and Text Blocks ...........................................................123Editing text ..........................................................................................123Copying and pasting text...................................................................124Moving a text block............................................................................125Resizing a text block ..........................................................................126Changing alignment............................................................................127Adjusting margins...............................................................................131Using tabs in a text block ..................................................................132Creating bulleted lists........................................................................135Creating numbered lists ....................................................................136Setting the indentation and spacing of text ....................................138Changing the Way Your Text Looks ...........................................................139Changing the font, size, color, and style of text..............................139Choosing a background color for a text block ...............................142Painting the formatting to other text...............................................143Rotating text........................................................................................143xiTable of Contents
  10. 10. Chapter 6: Connecting Shapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145Discovering Connectors..............................................................................145Working with Connection Points................................................................148Adding connection points to a shape..............................................148Deleting a connection point..............................................................149Using the automatic connection feature .........................................149Applying Glue (without the Mess).............................................................150Choosing static or dynamic glue......................................................151Identifying glue types.........................................................................152Switching from one glue to the other ..............................................153Setting glue options ...........................................................................154Gluing Connectors to Shapes .....................................................................155Connecting shapes as you drag them..............................................155Drawing connectors using the Connector Tool..............................156Saving time with the Connect Shapes feature ................................158Choosing a custom connector to connect shapes.........................158Dragging connector shapes into your drawing ..............................160Moving connectors ............................................................................161Managing Connectors..................................................................................162Handling connectors that cross paths ............................................162Performing changes on single connections quickly ......................164Laying Out Shapes Automatically..............................................................164Part III: Taking Your Drawings to the Next Level .........167Chapter 7: Perfecting Your Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169All about Measurements and Placement Tools........................................170Using the Drawing Grid ...............................................................................173Using Dynamic Grid .....................................................................................175Setting Drawing Scale ..................................................................................175Snapping Shapes into Place........................................................................178Measuring Up with Rulers...........................................................................181Using Guide Lines and Guide Points..........................................................184Creating guide lines............................................................................185Creating guide points.........................................................................186Aligning and Distributing Shapes...............................................................187Chapter 8: Creating and Customizing Shapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191Creating Unique Shapes the Fun Way........................................................192Uniting shapes ....................................................................................194Combining shapes..............................................................................195Fragmenting shapes...........................................................................195Intersecting shapes............................................................................197Subtracting shapes.............................................................................197Restacking shapes..............................................................................198Visio 2007 For Dummiesxii
  11. 11. Drawing Your Own Shapes..........................................................................200Drawing with the Line Tool ...............................................................200Drawing with the Pencil Tool............................................................202Drawing with the Arc Tool.................................................................203Creating irregular shapes with the Freeform Tool .........................204Creating shapes with the Ellipse Tool and Rectangle Tool...........204Manipulating Shapes....................................................................................205Moving and adding vertices..............................................................206Moving control points........................................................................208Rotating shapes ..................................................................................209Flipping shapes...................................................................................212Adding Style to Your Shapes.......................................................................213Changing line style .............................................................................213Adding fill color, pattern, and shadow ............................................216Copying formats .................................................................................218Reformatting a shape.........................................................................218Creating new theme colors ...............................................................218Creating new theme effects...............................................................220Copying new themes..........................................................................221Managing Shapes by Grouping...................................................................223Creating groups ..................................................................................223Editing a group....................................................................................224Adding a shape to a group ................................................................225Removing a shape from a group.......................................................225Adding text to grouped shapes ........................................................225Chapter 9: Working with Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .227The Role of the Template............................................................................227Reorienting a Page .......................................................................................228Setting a Page Size........................................................................................230Adding and Deleting Pages in a Drawing...................................................233Working with Multiple Pages ......................................................................237Getting from one page to another ....................................................238Displaying multiple pages at once ...................................................238Reordering pages................................................................................239Renaming Pages ...........................................................................................240Viewing on the Big Screen...........................................................................240What’s in a Background?.............................................................................242Creating and assigning a background page.....................................243Unassigning a background page.......................................................244Displaying a background page..........................................................245Editing a background page................................................................245Using a background shape ................................................................245Rotating Pages..............................................................................................246xiiiTable of Contents
  12. 12. Chapter 10: Layering Your Drawings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249Getting the Essential Facts on Layers and Layering................................250Working with Layers ....................................................................................252Toolbars for working with layers .....................................................253Adding a layer and removing one ....................................................253Renaming a layer ................................................................................255Hiding a layer......................................................................................256Assigning Shapes to Layers ........................................................................256Determining which layer a shape is assigned to............................258Activating layers.................................................................................258Using Layers on Background Pages...........................................................259Protecting Layers from Changes................................................................259Assigning a Color to a Layer.......................................................................260Selecting Layers to Print .............................................................................262Snap and Glue Options for Layers .............................................................263Part IV: Advancing Your Knowledge of Visio................265Chapter 11: Creating Stencils, Master Shapes, and Templates . . . .267Working with Stencils ..................................................................................267Using the Stencil toolbar ...................................................................268Using a Document Stencil..................................................................270Creating a custom stencil..................................................................271Naming master shapes on a custom stencil ...................................274Adding master shapes to a custom stencil.....................................276Deleting master shapes from a custom stencil ..............................277Creating a custom icon......................................................................277Creating a Custom Template ......................................................................278Chapter 12: Managing Shape Information, Behavior, andProtection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .281Storing Data in Visio Shapes.......................................................................281Entering custom shape data .............................................................284Editing custom property fields.........................................................285Reporting on Data Stored in Visio Shapes ................................................291Using a predefined report .................................................................292Creating a custom report ..................................................................294Customizing Shape Behavior......................................................................304Changing a shape from 2-D to 1-D ....................................................304Setting a shape’s group behavior.....................................................306Setting a shape’s double-click behavior..........................................306Protecting Your Work ..................................................................................308Preventing shapes from being changed ..........................................308Keeping drawings secure ..................................................................310Visio 2007 For Dummiesxiv
  13. 13. Chapter 13: Marking Up Drawings for Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .313Discovering Markup Tools ..........................................................................314Adding Comments to a Drawing.................................................................315How Markup Tracking Works .....................................................................316Working with Markup ..................................................................................318Using the Reviewing toolbar and the task pane.............................318Adding markup to a drawing ............................................................319Viewing markup in a drawing............................................................320Incorporating markup changes in a drawing..................................321Deleting markup .................................................................................323Using Digital Ink............................................................................................324Selecting an ink tool...........................................................................325Using ink tools ....................................................................................325Changing digital ink shapes to geometry........................................327Changing digital-ink shapes to text..................................................327Chapter 14: Using Visio with Other Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .329Using Files from Other Programs in Visio.................................................330Generating Drawings from Data Stored in Non-Visio Files......................331Creating an organization chart from existing data.........................332Creating a Gantt chart by importing data .......................................338Creating a calendar by importing Outlook appointments ............341Incorporating Visio Shapes and Drawings in Non-Visio Documents.....343Linking shapes and drawings............................................................344Embedding shapes in drawings........................................................345Hyperlinking shapes and drawings..................................................346Exporting and importing shapes and drawings .............................346Using Visio Viewer to Share Visio Drawings.............................................348Saving Visio Drawings for the Web ............................................................348Publishing Your Drawing in XPS Format ...................................................350Creating Data Links to SQL Server and Spreadsheets.............................350Using the Data Link feature...............................................................351Using the Data Graphics feature.......................................................353Working with the PivotDiagram feature ..........................................355Part V: The Part of Tens .............................................357Chapter 15: Ten Common Tasks in Visio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .359Rotating Shapes to a Specific Angle...........................................................359Centering a Drawing before Printing .........................................................360Resizing a Page to Fit the Content of a Drawing.......................................360Creating a Drawing That Spans Several Pages .........................................361Saving a Company Logo as a Stencil Shape..............................................361xvTable of Contents
  14. 14. Creating and Adding a Background Design to a Drawing .......................361Adjusting the Transparency of Shapes and Text in a Drawing...............362Adding the Same Shape or Image to All Pages in a Drawing ..................362Unlocking a Shape........................................................................................363Copying Formatting from One Shape to Another ....................................363Chapter 16: Ten Web Sites Devoted to Visio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .365VisioCafe........................................................................................................365Microsoft Visio .............................................................................................366Design-Drawing.............................................................................................366Visio The Blog...............................................................................................367Cisco Systems...............................................................................................367Dell .................................................................................................................367Microsoft Visio Home Page.........................................................................368Nick Finck......................................................................................................368ConceptDraw ................................................................................................368ABC Amber Conversion and Merging Software........................................369Index........................................................................371Visio 2007 For Dummiesxvi
  15. 15. IntroductionVisio is one of the most flexible and easy-to-use drawing products around.Yet, its ease of use doesn’t mean that this product lacks functionality. Youcan draw anything of just about any complexity you want. The whole focus ofVisio is getting your ideas down on electronic paper as quickly as possible.Using this program means that you can think about your ideas, rather thanhow to perform the next task. Visio 2007 For Dummies introduces you to thisvery exciting drawing program and demonstrates the ever-growing number offeatures it provides.Of course, you don’t have to use all of these features. Visio 2007 For Dummiesis structured like Visio — you can use as little or as much of the book as youwant to achieve your level of comfort with Visio. If your only goal is to sketchout a few ideas using something better than a napkin, the first two parts ofthe book are all you need.One of the most exciting things about Visio 2007 is that you gain access to anumber of new productivity features. Instead of wasting time formattingshapes one at a time, you can use themes to format an entire drawing withone click. If that sounds interesting, you’ll find the whole scoop in this book.Likewise, if you’re tired of having to update the data in a drawing manuallyevery time you open one, check out the new Data Link feature. This featuremakes it possible to track changes to a system quickly and easily. Analystswill love the new PivotDiagram feature. You can drill down as far as neces-sary to see the interactions in your data when using Visio. These are just afew of the new features you’ll find in this book.About This BookThis book is for anyone who has an idea that he or she wants to put down onpaper. It doesn’t matter who you are; somewhere, someone has a templateyou can use to start drawing quickly and has a set of stencils with shapes foryour particular trade. The number of templates and stencils that Visio pro-vides is nothing short of amazing (read about them in Chapter 2). However,these templates and stencils are just the tip of the iceberg. Visio is all aboutyou. Instead of forcing you to jump through hoops, Visio helps you get thatidea down on paper. This book is your guide to all of the cool features thatVisio provides. If you want to get started creating drawings for your ideasquickly, this is the book to get.
  16. 16. With this in mind, Visio 2007 For Dummies is designed to make you produc-tive as quickly as possible. You find basic, useful information that helps youaccomplish your goals. You find real-world examples and figures that showyou how to do something rather than just tell you. You find concise step-by-step instructions for accomplishing specific tasks rather than a lot of ram-bling text that fills space and means nothing to you.This book doesn’t provide everything to everyone. For example, even thoughVisio supports Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) so you can write programsto make it do even more, this book doesn’t discuss VBA. Visio 2007 ForDummies focuses on user tasks; it makes you more productive, fast.Conventions Used in This BookHere’s a summary of the conventions used in this book:ߜ When directions indicate that you type something, for example, “Enter13 in the size box,” the characters you type appear in bold.ߜ When you are to click something, that means to click your left mousebutton. Right-clicking is — you guessed it — clicking the right mousebutton. (These terms assume that you are using the mouse with yourright hand.)ߜ When you drag something, you click and hold the left mouse button asyou move the mouse. Release the mouse button when you’re finisheddragging.ߜ The term shortcut menu refers to the pop-up menu that appears whenyou right-click something on the screen. (Shortcut menus are not avail-able for all elements in a drawing.)ߜ You can select commands using toolbar buttons, menu commands, orthe Alt key. Because toolbar buttons are by far the fastest method, thesebuttons are always listed along with the menu command. (When toolbarbuttons aren’t available, only the menu command is shown.) A menucommand is specified by writing, for example, Choose File➪Save, whichmeans click the File menu to open it and then choose the Save option.What You’re Not to ReadIf you’re new to Visio and just want to know enough to create simple draw-ings or diagrams, you can safely skip Part IV. That section takes you deeperinto customizing Visio and using some of its advanced features. Clearly, notevery reader will become devoted to discovering advanced features. Browse2 Visio 2007 For Dummies
  17. 17. through Part III for any features that you might find useful and have the timeto work through. Also, glance through Part V, which contains many interest-ing tips, tricks, and trivia that you might find very useful.On the other hand, if you’ve used Visio before, you can safely skip Parts I andII, which offer basic getting-up-and-running information.Foolish AssumptionsYou probably have a reasonable working knowledge of Microsoft Windowsand have at least some idea of what you want to draw. For this reason,Chapter 1 doesn’t spend any of your valuable time describing how to findyour way around Windows or how to work with dialog boxes. If you need toreview these concepts, see Windows Vista For Dummies, by Andy Rathbone(published by Wiley).Although Chapter 2 does provide a basic overview of all of the templatesavailable in Visio, this book doesn’t tell you when you need to use the UnifiedModeling Language (UML) Model Diagram template. If you don’t alreadyknow what the UML Model Diagram does, you can safely skip that descrip-tion. None of the examples in the book focus on a particular kind of diagramexcept when you need a specific diagram type to accomplish a particulartask in the more advanced sections. In short, all of the procedures and tech-niques work for all diagram types unless the book specifically mentions thatyou must use a particular diagram type.How This Book Is OrganizedVisio 2007 For Dummies is organized into five distinct parts. Use the parts toguide you to where you want to go on your Visio journey. You don’t need toread the chapters in order. The book is designed so that you can skip aroundto suit your needs.Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 BasicsPart I lays the groundwork for your success with Visio. Every software pro-gram has its unique personality; Visio is no exception. Here you find concep-tual information about Visio, get the Visio terminology down, discover howto recognize and work with what’s on the screen, start Visio, save and openfiles, and print drawings.3Introduction
  18. 18. Part II: Creating Visio DrawingsPart II is for those in a hurry because it teaches you the basics of creating asimple drawing. You find out about the basic elements of a Visio drawing anddiscover how to implement those elements in your drawing. You’ll also dis-cover how to add and manipulate text, as well as how to work with marginsand tabs, indentation, alignment, spacing, and more. You see how to use andmanipulate a drawing’s connectors, the lines that connect one shape toanother. (They’re more than just simple lines, as you’ll soon discover.)Part III: Taking Your Drawingsto the Next LevelIn Part III, you move into the intermediate features of Visio. You find out howto place shapes precisely on a drawing, create your own shapes, enhance andmanipulate shapes, perform complex tasks with connectors, and work withpages and layers.Part IV: Advancing YourKnowledge of VisioCertainly not every user needs to pursue Part IV! Here you find out how tocreate custom templates and themes, how to store data in shapes and reporton that data, and how to protect your shapes and drawings from inadvertentchanges. You also see how to use Visio drawings with other programs andhow to save files for publishing on the Web. Most importantly, this is the partthat helps you discover the new Data Link and PivotDiagram functionalitythat Visio provides.Part V: The Part of TensOne of the most useful sections of every For Dummies book, “The Part ofTens” is a collection of a variety of information. In Visio 2007 For Dummies,you find ten “how to” pointers for useful tasks and ten pointers to onlineresources for Visio.4 Visio 2007 For Dummies
  19. 19. About the Web SiteThis book contains a wealth of drawing examples, a few themes, some sten-cils, and other helpful Visio drawing information. Trying to replicate what yousee in the book precisely could be time consuming and wholly unnecessarysince the work is already done. Consequently, you’ll find all of the art in thisbook on the Dummies Web site at www.dummies.com/go/visiofd2007. Allyou need to do is download it, locate the chapter you’re working with, andopen the drawing you want to use. The drawings all have names that maketheir purpose quite clear. Using the Web site content will help you discoverVisio with greater ease without having to worry about becoming an artist todo it.Icons Used in This BookThe following icons are used in this text to call attention to specific types ofinformation.The Tip icon indicates information that’s likely to save you time or informa-tion that will make you say to yourself, “Wow, I never knew that!” Be sure toread this stuff.Wherever a Technical Stuff icon occurs, you’ll find a discussion of somethingthat’s bogged down in technical jargon. Generally, you can skip these para-graphs because they contain advanced information. However, more experi-enced readers will want to read this material because it provides essentialinformation for advancing your skill further.Definitely pay attention to the Warning icons. They’re designed to warn youof impending doom or, at the very least, a possible problem you’d just assoon avoid.Remember icons are designed as a gentle nudge rather than a blatant slam tothe head. In other words, “Remember this — it may be important to yousome day.”This icon draws attention to the slick new improvements in Visio 2007.Chapter 1 provides an overview of these new features. However, Microsoftimproved Visio 2007 in a considerable number of ways, so it’s important tolook for these icons when you’re upgrading from an earlier version of Visio.5Introduction
  20. 20. Where to Go from HereIf you’ve never used Visio before, definitely start with Part I! Work your waythrough Part II as well, but don’t feel that you must go beyond this point. Ifyou’ve used Visio before, you might get crazy and start with Part V, skimParts I and II, and go directly to Parts III and IV to look for any features youmight not be familiar with. Whether you are a beginner or an experiencedVisio user, be sure to look through Part V for answers, tips, and pointers toVisio-related Web sites.6 Visio 2007 For Dummies
  21. 21. Part IStarting withVisio 2007 Basics
  22. 22. In this part . . .Visio is an amazing program! If you can imagine it, youcan probably sketch it using Visio. Many people useVisio as their only drawing application because it does pro-vide great output, but many others use it for sketchingtheir ideas and sharing them with others. In some respects,Visio is a tool for showing your dreams to others.Other drawing applications help you create graphics.Visio, however, is a different animal. It’s not really a draw-ing program, and it’s certainly not a Computer-AidedDesign (CAD) program. In this part, you understand whatVisio is and what it does, you discover how to “speak” and“think” Visio, you negotiate your way around the screen,and you find out how to get help when you need it. Youalso print a drawing, something you’ll no doubt find usefulif you want to be productive!This part of the book also provides a complete listing ofthe templates that Visio provides so that you betterunderstand what comes in the package. Of course, youcan always add to these basic templates. Look at the Visioofferings as a place to start.
  23. 23. Chapter 1Visio101In This Chapterᮣ Getting the scoop on Visio featuresᮣ Understanding the lingo of Visioᮣ Opening Visio and touring the screenᮣ Getting helpᮣ Closing the programClose your eyes for a minute and picture the amount of visual informationthat comes to you on any given day. Magazines, newspapers, reports,television programs, and presentations illustrate a great deal of informationin the form of charts, tables, graphs, diagrams, and technical drawings. Thesegraphical elements often convey ideas far more quickly and clearly than long,boring paragraphs. You don’t typically think of charts, diagrams, and graphsas art, but they are graphical, and this is where Visio comes in.Although Visio is easy to use, you can benefit from a bit of explanation beforeyou jump right in creating drawings. In this chapter, you become familiar withwhat you see on the Visio screen and find out how Visio works conceptually.Getting the Scoop on VisioIn simple terms, Visio is a diagramming tool for anyone who needs to createdrawings, even self-confirmed nonartists. Although many people view Visioas a drawing tool, it isn’t one, because it requires no artistic ability. It’s moreaccurate to say that Visio is a diagramming tool. That’s reassuring becauseeven in highly analytical, non-art-related careers, you may need to create achart, diagram, or drawing! If the suggestion of drawing anything strikesterror in your heart, Visio can help.
  24. 24. Visio’s grab bag of icons — or shapes, as Visio calls them — represents allsorts of things from computer network components, to office furniture, toboxes on an organization chart or a flow chart, to electrical switches andrelays. Even programmers can use Visio to create diagrams that representapplication elements and then use that content to create the application. Yousimply drag the shapes that you want into the drawing window, and arrangeand connect them the way that you want. You can add text and other graphi-cal elements wherever you like.Comparing Visio productsOver the years, Visio has been available in several different flavors —Standard, Professional, Technical, and Enterprise — plus you could findadvanced developer’s tools in Visual Studio .NET and advanced network dia-gramming tools in Visio Enterprise Network Tools. Whew! All these versionsbecame confusing and overwhelming to the average user, so Microsoftdecided to simplify things and produce just two editions of Visio: Standardand Professional. The same “engine” drives both, but the audience for each isslightly different and the types of charts and diagrams you can createaddress different needs:ߜ Visio Standard: Designed for business professionals, this edition givesall kinds of businesspeople — from product managers to financial ana-lysts to sales and marketing professionals — the ability to create busi-ness-related charts and diagrams that illustrate business processes,marketing trends, organizations, project schedules, and so on. However,just about anyone can make use of this version. For example, an officemanager could use this version to show the office arrangement in abuilding or the structure of an organization. It’s important to not limityourself; Visio can help you diagram just about anything you can imag-ine as long as the diagram doesn’t require the precise measurementsnormally provided by a computer-aided design (CAD) program.ߜ Visio Professional: Designed for technical users, this edition includeseverything that Visio Standard includes and more. Network managersand designers, electrical engineers, IT managers, facilities planners,Internet specialists, Web designers and administrators, and softwaredevelopers can use Visio Professional to create charts and diagrams thatillustrate a wide variety of technical concepts and processes. The pro-fessional version also contains a number of database features that youcan use to import data from other applications. For example, you couldimport information from Access and use it to create a special diagram.So, how do you know which Visio is right for you? If you’re involved in net-works, IT, Internet or Web design, electrical engineering, architecture facili-ties planning and management, or software development, Visio Professional10 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  25. 25. is the edition to use because it provides all the shapes and symbols you needto create simple or complex diagrams. If you’re not involved in any of thesefields but are a business professional involved in company sales, profits, mar-keting, or managing projects, Visio Standard is right for you. It includes allthe shapes you need to create business-related charts, diagrams, and draw-ings, without cluttering your screen with shapes you’ll never use (such as aproximity limit switch or a guided light transmitter).It’s easy to get lost when you look at all of the diagrams that Visio can create.Many people get started using Visio for simple needs. For example, just abouteveryone needs a calendar from time to time. With Visio, you can create acustom calendar to meet any need. You can also use it to create directionalmaps to show someone how to get from the airport to your company. Whenworking with Visio, it’s best to start simple and work your way up to the com-plex diagrams used by various professionals.A quick peek at some Visio featuresVisio is often a misunderstood product, especially by those who’ve neverused it. Some people limit Visio to drawing organizational charts, but it cando considerably more. The following list describes some of the tasks you canperform with Visio:ߜ Printing what you want: Even though creating a diagram in Visio isrelatively easy, you still need to show other people the graphical repre-sentation of your ideas. Fortunately, Visio provides extensive printingcapabilities, which means you get just the output you need. (SeeChapter 3 for more information on printing everything from a simplecalendar to complex floor diagrams.)ߜ Diagrams without drawing: Visio provides a wealth of shapes that youcan use to create diagrams of any type. All you do is place the shapewhere you want to see it on-screen; no drawing is required! (See Chapter 2for more information on using shapes to create any diagram type.)ߜ Customize shapes easily: One of the best features of Visio is that youcan use it to customize shapes in a number of ways. You can add text,modify the size of the shape, change its appearance, and connectshapes. No matter what your skill level or how you use Visio, you cancreate professional-looking results with a few clicks. (See Chapters 5through 7 for details on customizing shapes simply. Chapter 8 describeshow you can create your own shapes when the defaults don’t work.Chapters 9 through 12 show how to manipulate shapes in various ways.)ߜ See only the data you need: Data overload is a condition where youbecome overwhelmed by the very data that you’re supposed to use tocomplete tasks. Layering in Visio helps you reduce complexity by letting11Chapter 1: Visio 101
  26. 26. you see only the layer of data you actually need. All of the data is stillthere, but you only access it when you actually need it. (See Chapter 10for ideas on how you can use layering to manage your data efficiently.)ߜ Make your diagrams a group activity: The ability to comment on ideas ina group is essential in business today. The diagrams that you create areideas only they’re in graphical, rather than textual, format. Visio helps youmake the diagrams you create a group activity by providing a number ofways to add comments and revisions. (See Chapter 13 for more informa-tion on working with comments and the Visio review features.)ߜ Report on data: Wouldn’t it be great if you could store data in a drawingand then report on that data? With Visio, you can. Suppose you draw anoffice layout plan that includes cubicle walls, fixtures, office furniture,and telephone and computer equipment. You can store each piece of fur-niture and office equipment with data such as its inventory number,owner, and current location. From this drawing, you can generate prop-erty, inventory, and location reports. (See Chapter 12 for more informa-tion on storing and reporting on data in shapes.)ߜ Use the drill-down feature: Jump quickly from an overview drawing to adetailed drawing and back again. For example, you can draw an overviewmap of a worldwide computer network and double-click the name of acity to see a drawing of that city’s computer network. This drill-down fea-ture is possible because Visio lets you define a shape’s behavior whenyou double-click it. (See Chapter 12 for more information.)ߜ Generate drawings from data: In contrast to the previous point, would-n’t it be great to be able to generate drawings from existing data? Again,with Visio, you can. Suppose you have employee data (name, title,department, reporting manager, and so on) stored in a text or spread-sheet file. You can generate an organization chart automatically fromthis data using Visio. (See Chapter 14 for more information on usingexternal data in Visio.)ߜ Use hyperlinks: Often, you can’t convey in a single drawing all the infor-mation necessary to make your point. You might want to refer the readerto a separate drawing, a Web site, or another document with relatedinformation. With Visio, you can add hyperlinks to a drawing or shape.This is an invaluable feature for pulling pieces of information together topresent a comprehensive picture. (See Chapter 14 for tips on usinghyperlinks in diagrams.)Visio actually provides support for eight categories of drawings. You cancreate everything from business charts to software and database diagrams.The “Understanding the Visio Drawing Categories” section of Chapter 2 pro-vides a description of each of these drawing categories so that you have abetter idea of precisely what Visio can do for you.12 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  27. 27. What’s new in Visio 2007?Visio 2007 has a lot to offer. With each update, Visio improves the functional-ity you need to create diagrams quickly. The emphasis in this update isefficiency — helping you get more done with fewer errors and in less time.The following list provides you with an overview of the major featurechanges in Visio 2007. You’ll see these features described in more detailthroughout the book.ߜ Starting quickly with improved templates: Visio 2007 supports fewertemplate categories and the category names now make more sense. Youactually have access to more templates, but Microsoft has organizedthem better. In addition, the template examples are larger with clear textdescriptions, so you have a better idea of how to use a particular tem-plate. A recent template list tells you which templates you use mostoften and makes these templates easier to access. The Professional edi-tion also includes sample diagrams and data sources that you can useas examples of how to retrieve data from your own data sources.ߜ Improving drawing appearance with themes: You have probably seenthe effect of themes in Windows. A theme in Visio is the same concept.You use themes to give your diagrams a particular appearance. Usingthemes helps ensure that your diagrams have a pleasing appearance andare easy to see.ߜ Automatically connecting shapes: Visio now makes it easier to creategreat-looking drawings with greater ease by creating the connectionsyou need automatically and aligning new drawing elements. You canconnect drawing elements when you drag the shape onto the form.However, when you decide to make the connection later, all you need todo is point at the two connectors that you want to connect. You’ll dis-cover more about these fast connection techniques in Chapter 6.ߜ Sharing diagrams with other Office applications: Keeping othersinformed about your ideas is essential. This feature relies on SharePointserver to make it easier to share data in various ways. For example, youcan generate a Visio pivotdiagram from within Microsoft Project and placeit on SharePoint server for comment by other collaborators. You can alsoattach Visio diagrams to e-mail created in Outlook. Other people can seethe diagrams even if they don’t have Visio installed.ߜ Saving data using the XPS file format: A problem with custom data for-mats is that it isn’t easy to move the data to other locations. The XMLPaper Specification (XPS) file format provides a standard method ofsaving your data in a form that other applications can use. You can effec-tively use the data in any application that supports XML.13Chapter 1: Visio 101
  28. 28. ߜ Improving efficiency with smaller diagrams: Other people don’t alwaysneed every piece of information in a diagram. For example, you mighthave unused master shapes or comments that other people don’t needto see. Visio makes it easier to clean up your diagrams before you sendthem to someone else. In addition to presenting a cleaner form, your dia-gram will also consume less space, making it more efficient for datatransfers and local storage.One of the ways you can determine whether you need Visio Professional edi-tion is by the features it provides. The following list describes a number ofspecial features that the Professional edition provides. These aren’t the onlydifferences, but they’re significant reasons for choosing the Professional edi-tion over the Standard edition.ߜ New templates and shapes: The Professional edition of Visio comes witha number of new templates and shapes that make it easier to displaycomplex data on-screen. The PivotDiagram, Value Stream Map, andInformation Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) templates help youmodel complex data in new ways. In addition, the new Work Flow shapesthat are part of the Work Flow Diagram template help you model dynamicworkflows that better match how people in your company perform tasks.Workflows model business processes of all types, which includes every-thing from the steps to produce a product to the events that occur whenyou receive a customer order.ߜ Using data from other sources in diagrams: You already have a vaststore of data to use in creating diagrams. The problem is that this dataisn’t in graphical format, making it very difficult to understand. Visionow makes it easy to create a connection to that data so that the infor-mation you already have appears in the diagrams you create. Because ofthe connection between your diagram and the data source, any changesin the data automatically appear in the diagram. A new Data SelectorWizard helps you create the data connection to data in other applica-tions such as Access, SQL Server, and Excel (in addition to a number ofnon-Microsoft products).ߜ Seeing data in the Data Graphics task pane: Getting data from an exter-nal data source is only part of the process. Although plain text is fine fora report, you might want to dress it up a bit for your diagram. The DataGraphics task pane helps you turn plain text into something that willdazzle those around you.ߜ Viewing complex data using a pivotdiagram: A pivotdiagram is a collec-tion of shapes in a treelike structure that helps you present complexdata in a less confusing manner. Using a pivotdiagram helps you analyzethe data, drill down into it, and display it from various perspectives.14 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  29. 29. Familiarizing Yourself with Visio LingoLike all software programs, Visio uses a particular terminology. You need tobe familiar with the following terms before you begin creating diagrams anddrawings:ߜ Drag and drop: The method Visio uses to create drawings. What are youdragging and where are you dropping it, you ask? You drag shapes andyou drop them onto a drawing page.ߜ Shape: Probably the most important element in Visio. A shape repre-sents an object of nearly any conceivable kind, such as a piece of officefurniture in an office-layout diagram, a road sign in a directional map, aserver in a network diagram, a box on an organization chart, or a bar ona comparison chart. Visio contains literally thousands of shapes. Youcan draw and save your own shapes as described in Chapter 8.ߜ Master shape: A shape that you see on a stencil. When you drag a shapeonto the drawing page, you’re copying a master shape onto your drawingpage, making it just one instance of that shape. Visio makes the distinc-tion between master shapes and instances of shapes. The only time thisdistinction is important is when you begin modifying Visio to meet spe-cific needs by creating your own shapes.ߜ Stencil: A tool Visio uses to organize shapes so that you can find the oneyou’re looking for. A stencil is nothing more than a collection of relatedshapes. If you want to create a cubicle-layout diagram for your office, forexample, you use the cubicles stencil, which includes shapes such asworkstations, posts, panels, work surfaces, storage units, and file cabi-nets. Stencils are displayed in the Shapes pane on the left side of thescreen so that the shapes are always available while you’re working.ߜ Template: A collection of stencils in addition to predefined documentsettings. A template is essentially a model for creating a particular typeof drawing. A template defines certain characteristics of the drawing sothat the drawing is consistent. For example, when you use a Visio tem-plate for a specific type of drawing, Visio automatically opens one ormore appropriate stencils, defines the page size and scale of your draw-ing, and defines appropriate styles for things such as text, fills, and lines.You can change any of these elements, but the point of using a templateis to maintain consistency throughout the drawing.ߜ Connector: A line that connects one shape to another. Perhaps the mostcommon example of a connector is in an organization chart. The lines thatconnect the president to various groups in an organization and the linesthat run through an organization are connectors. Chapter 6 describes con-nectors in detail.15Chapter 1: Visio 101
  30. 30. Understanding the Vista DifferenceVisio operates a little differently from a visual and security perspective underVista than it does under earlier versions of Windows, such as Windows XP. Infact, you don’t get to see all of the functionality that Visio can provide unlessyou use it under Vista. The best way to describe these differences is to groupthem into two categories: graphical (what you can see) and security (the pro-tection Visio provides).In addition to Visio-specific changes, Vista also requires a change in how youperform some Visio-related tasks. For example, when you want to work with aprinter in Vista, you must locate it within the Control Panel. It’s easy to findthe Vista specifics in the Visio help file. Simply type Vista in the Search fieldof the Visio Help file and click Search. The following sections describe theVisio-specific differences in Vista.The graphical interface differenceVista sports the new Aero Glass visual interface. This new interface offerssome efficiencies not found in older versions of Windows and, of course, itprovides a healthy dose of eye candy. The big thing to remember is that Vistadoesn’t affect the actual functionality of Visio. All of the features (the tech-niques you use to perform a task) work the same under Windows XP as theydo under Vista.You do receive some additional benefits from using Vista. Graphics do appearfaster on-screen and you’ll notice that Vista does tend to make the graphicslook better. For example, the fonts are easier to read and the lines used tocreate a diagram look crisper. Even though this might seem like a small bene-fit for Visio users who work in Vista, the effects can reduce eyestrain andhelp you avoid mistakes that you might otherwise make. Vista makes it lesslikely that you’ll encounter errors such as connections where you didn’tthink any existed.Helpful user interface changesVista also promises to be a less painful experience for users. For example,normally when you apply a patch and the system has to reboot, you have torestart your applications, locate your position, and only then start workagain. It’s a waste of time and effort. Vista provides a new feature calledFreeze Dry that remembers program settings such as window size, windowposition, and even cursor position. After a system reboots, Vista automati-cally resets your Office application to its previous state for you.16 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  31. 31. You may have run into problems accessing information on international Websites in the past. Vista now supports the special characters used by these Websites so that your Visio experience can include data from these sites. In addi-tion, Vista provides full Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) support. This meansthat your copy of Visio is ready to work with the additional Web addressesthat IPv6 provides.All Office products now use the Vista Save, Open, and Insert common dialogboxes, which means that you gain full access to the Vista functionality. TheVista functionality includes the ability to organize your files with greater easeand to search for documents based on metadata as well as regular content.For example, you can search for a Visio document based on the author or thecomments you provide.A very useful feature for Visio users is the ability to store a thumbnail of yourdiagram. Instead of looking one document at a time for a particular diagram,you can simply view the thumbnails. This feature makes it considerablyeasier to locate a particular diagram. Even when several diagrams look simi-lar, you can usually reduce the number of diagrams you have to check.Office also emphasizes reliability under Vista. If Office or Vista detects that acertain operation could cause the operating system to crash, Office will stopthe operation and tell you about the problem, rather than attempting to per-form the operation as it did in the past. Generally, this feature means thatyou’ll not only see fewer crashes, but you’ll also encounter a reduced risk ofdata loss.Understanding the security featuresThe biggest reason to use Vista is the security features. It’s a lot easier to pro-tect the data in your diagrams under Vista and you’ll find that the security isvery reliable. In addition, many of the security features work automatically.You don’t have to remember to change a setting to protect the data, in manycases, because Vista does it for you — at least from an operating systemlevel. The following sections describe a few other security changes for Visiousers under Vista.Defining the difference between users and administratorsOne of the most difficult changes that users will encounter under Vista is thatit differentiates between users and administrators. In addition, every accountworks in user mode most of the time. Consequently, activities that mighthave worked fine in the past may not work under Vista. For example, you’llfind that you need to give yourself permission to access your data directory.Although this sounds very odd, it does help protect your data. No one gainsaccess to your data unless you specifically give him rights to do so.17Chapter 1: Visio 101
  32. 32. Digitally signing your macrosYou’ll probably find that those macros you relied on in previous versions ofVisio no longer work. That’s because most people don’t sign their macros. Inorder to use macros successfully in many cases, you must digitally sign thefile that contains them. Since Microsoft is making this particular feature morerobust as it introduces new versions of Office and Windows, it’s probably agood time to start signing your macros now.In addition to macros, you’ll find that Vista makes it more difficult to performsome tasks using Explorer or typing from the command line. For example,you must have administrative privileges to perform tasks such as deleting afile. These changes work along with the macro protection to make it lesslikely that an errant macro will destroy your data. If your macro performs anycommand line tasks, such as deleting a file, it also requires the correct privi-leges. The bottom line is that no matter how you try to perform some tasks,Vista won’t let you unless you have the correct rights. Many macros willsimply stop working as currently written.This book doesn’t discuss how to create or use macros. A book such as VBAFor Dummies, 5th Edition (published by Wiley) provides complete coverageof this topic.Relying on trusted locationsVista is also quite fussy about where you store your data. Trying to open afile on a network drive or store data on a network drive will normally meetwith a number of permission requests. Generally, you must have administra-tive privileges or specific rights on the network drive to use it. In this case,however, you can get around the problem by setting Visio to use trusted loca-tions. See the “Saving Drawings” section of Chapter 2 for more details onusing trusted locations.Jumping Head First into VisioThe best way to get started with Visio is to open a new drawing page, so youcan cruise around the screen and get a feel for what’s there. Then, in Chapter 2,you create a drawing.To start Visio, choose Start➪Programs➪Microsoft Office➪Microsoft OfficeVisio 2007. Visio displays the window shown in Figure 1-1.18 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  33. 33. Visio divides the application functionality into several areas. At the top arethe toolbars and menus you use when working with Visio. Most of the toolbarentries are grayed out because you haven’t selected a template yet. The restof the book describes these entries. Along the left side of the display, you seeseveral entries that control the appearance of the right side of Visio. Forexample, when you select Getting Started, you see topics that help you beginusing Visio. The following list describes these entries:ߜ Getting Started: This entry displays two panes. The center pane con-tains information on how to get started using Visio. You can obtain infor-mation about training, templates, and downloading, in addition to thelatest news about Visio. The right pane contains a list of your currentprojects. Simply click the project to open it.ߜ Samples: If you’re wondering how to use a particular diagram templateor simply don’t want to start from scratch, select the Samples entry.This entry also displays two panes on the right side. The center panecontains a list of the samples that Microsoft has provided. The sampleentry contains a basic view of the template type and the sample name.The right pane contains a detailed view of the selected sample. The dia-gram is bigger and more detailed. You’ll also see a write-up about theFigure 1-1:A typicalVisioopeningscreen.19Chapter 1: Visio 101
  34. 34. sample. To use the sample, select the US Units or Metric option, andclick Open Sample Data.ߜ Category: The Category list shows eight items. These items representthe diagram types including Business, Engineering, Flowchart, General,Maps and Floor Plans, Network, Schedule, and Software and Database.Selecting a particular category displays a list of associated templates inthe center pane. For example, when you select the Business category,you see Brainstorming Diagram, Organizational Chart, and PivotDiagramas templates. Below these templates is a list of other templates that youmight want to see when looking for business diagrams, even thoughMicrosoft hasn’t placed them in this category. Select a particular tem-plate and you’ll see a larger, more detailed picture of it along with a two-or three-sentence description. To create a new drawing based on a tem-plate, choose the template, select the US Units or Metric option, andclick Create.Getting familiar with the Visio screenA typical Visio screen looks like the one shown in Figure 1-2. This screen isdisplayed when you select the General category and the Basic Diagram (USunits) template. In this section, you look at what’s going on in this window.Figure 1-2:A typicaldrawingscreen inVisio.20 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  35. 35. The display contains the same menu, Standard toolbar, and Formatting tool-bar as before, but the entries are active now. The left side of the display con-tains the Shapes window, while the right side contains the Drawing window.The Shapes window contains the list of shapes that you can use. In this case,the drawing is using the Box shape. The shapes appear within stencils. Thisexample uses the Blocks (US Units) stencil.The Drawing window contains the area where you create a diagram. You seerulers across the top and left side of this window that help you position andsize shapes. The drawing area looks like graph paper. You can use the lines toposition shapes, as shown in Figure 1-2.Checking out the menusVisio’s menu bar contains some typical menus found in almost every Windowsapplication (such as File, Edit, Format, and Help). Even so, it’s important toreview each menu for commands that you may not expect. The following listdescribes commands unique to Visio (even though some of the menus mightlook familiar):ߜ Tools: On this menu, you find all kinds of tools for working with Visioshapes, the Visio drawing page, and the drawing itself. There are toolsfor setting Visio’s color palette, rulers, grids, and so on. You also find thestandard Microsoft options such as Spelling, Track Markup, Customize,and Options.ߜ Data: The Data menu only appears when you use the Professional edi-tion. It contains entries that help you obtain data from other sourcesand create reports.ߜ Shape: The Shape menu contains commands for grouping, rotating, flip-ping, and aligning, as well as commands for choosing a drawing’s colorscheme. You also find commands for changing the stacking order ofshapes and doing some creative things such as fragmenting and inter-secting shapes. (See Chapter 8 for details.)The options on the Shape menu change depending on the type of draw-ing you’re creating.For certain types of drawings, Visio adds an additional menu to the menu bar.For example, when you create a Gantt chart using the Gantt Chart template inthe Schedule category, Visio adds a Gantt Chart menu just after the Shapemenu and before the Window menu (see Figure 1-3). On the Gantt Chartmenu, you find commands specific to creating Gantt charts, such as addingand deleting tasks, linking tasks, and setting working hours. As soon as youclose the drawing, the menu option disappears.21Chapter 1: Visio 101
  36. 36. Working with toolbarsVisio has a dozen or so toolbars, two of which are displayed automaticallywhen you start the program. The two default toolbars are Standard andFormatting. You can hide either of these, and you can display additional tool-bars as well.After you begin to recognize the toolbar buttons, it’s much faster to click abutton than to select a menu command. Many of these buttons appear on theCheat Sheet at the beginning of this book.To hide or display toolbars, right-click anywhere in the toolbar area. On theshortcut menu that appears, click a toolbar name. Toolbars that have a checkmark next to them are displayed; all others are hidden (see Figure 1-4).Figure 1-4:The toolbarshortcutmenu letsyou turntoolbars onand off.Figure 1-3:Visio insertsa new menuin the menubar whenyou create aGantt chart.22 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  37. 37. All Visio toolbars can be docked at different locations on the screen. Just grabthe vertical bar at the left end of any toolbar and drag it to a new location onthe screen. A moved toolbar automatically becomes its own window, and youcan position it anywhere you like on the screen by dragging its title bar.If you’re a toolbar fanatic, you might want to customize the toolbars by addingbuttons you use most often and deleting buttons you never use. You can alsochoose any buttons you want and create a new toolbar.Creating a toolbarTo create a custom toolbar, follow these steps:1. Choose View➪Toolbars➪Customize.Visio displays the Customize dialog box.2. On the Toolbars tab, click the New button.Visio displays the New Toolbar dialog box.3. In the Toolbar Name field, type a name (see Figure 1-5), and then clickthe OK button.Visio adds the new name to the list of toolbars and displays a new, blanktoolbar on the screen. (It’s small, but it’s there!)4. If you want to add buttons to the new toolbar, drag and drop the newblank toolbar into the toolbar area, and then follow the steps in thenext section, “Modifying a toolbar.”5. Click Close to close the Customize dialog box.Figure 1-5:You can addand deletetoolbarbuttons orcreate acustomtoolbar.23Chapter 1: Visio 101
  38. 38. Modifying a toolbarIf you just want to add a button here or there, consider modifying an existingtoolbar rather than creating a new one. However, in many cases, it’s a goodidea to create your own custom toolbar so that you can see everything youwant without having to worry about someone changing the toolbar back to adefault state later. Use the following steps to modify any toolbar:1. Display the toolbar that you want to change.To do so, right-click the toolbar area and select the toolbar.2. Right-click the toolbar and choose Customize.Visio displays the Customize dialog box.3. Click the Commands tab.Categories are on the left and commands are on the right, as shown inFigure 1-6.4. Click a category on the left, and then scroll through the list of com-mands (buttons) on the right.5. Drag the button from the dialog box to the location on the toolbarwhere you want to add the button.When you release the mouse button, the new button becomes part ofthe existing toolbar at the point where you dropped it.Deleting a button from a toolbarSometimes you end up with buttons you don’t really want on a toolbar. Thefollowing steps tell how to remove a button from a toolbar:1. Display the toolbar that you want to change.Figure 1-6:Choose atoolbar onthe left andbuttons onthe right.24 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  39. 39. 2. Right-click the toolbar and choose Customize.Visio displays the Customize dialog box.3. Drag the button that you want to delete off the toolbar.If you want to delete additional buttons, repeat this step.4. Click the Close button to close the Customize dialog box.Getting Help When You Need ItVisio makes it easy to obtain help about any topic. Microsoft has centralizedhelp in Visio 2007 and made it easier to use. The following sections describethe two forms of help that Visio provides.Using general helpVisio presents help using a separate window. You can display this window byclicking the question mark (?) in any dialog box and pointing to any control.Visio displays the Help window with the information for that control displayed.If you want help on a general topic, choose the Help➪Microsoft Office VisioHelp command. You see a general listing of Visio help as shown in Figure 1-7.Figure 1-7:The generalhelp topicshelp youfind theinformationyou needquickly.25Chapter 1: Visio 101
  40. 40. If you don’t see the help you want, type a search term in the Type Words toSearch For field and click Search. For example, if you want to learn moreabout the Vista differences for Visio, type Vista and click Search. Help dis-plays all of the entries associated with Vista in the right pane.Sometimes Help returns too much information. You can limit the scope of asearch by clicking the down arrow next to the Search button. The contextmenu contains a list of places that you can search. For example, you mightchoose to search just the Visio Templates, rather than All Visio (the default).You may not have any search terms in mind when you begin your search.Perhaps you’re just looking to see what Visio offers. In this case, you can usethe Table of Contents list in the left pane of the Help window. Click a bookicon to open that particular topic. You can drill down through the topics tofind the information you need.Don’t forget ToolTipsLike most Windows programs, Visio also uses ToolTips. When you point to abutton on a toolbar and hover over it (pause without clicking), a tip pops upto tell you the name of the button. This is especially helpful when you’relearning Visio.Visio expanded the concept of ToolTips to its stencils. When you hover overa stencil shape, a tip pops up and gives the name of the shape and a descrip-tion, as shown in Figure 1-8.If you don’t want to view ToolTips or stencil tips, choose Tools➪Options, andthen click the View tab. Click to remove the check mark from ToolbarScreenTips and Other ScreenTips, and then click OK.26 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  41. 41. Closing VisioWhen you’re ready to close Visio, choose File➪Exit. If you haven’t recentlysaved all open files, Visio prompts you to do so for each file. Choose Yes tosave or Cancel to return to Visio without saving the drawing.Figure 1-8:Hover overa shape onthe stencilto displayVisio shapetips.27Chapter 1: Visio 101
  42. 42. 28 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  43. 43. Chapter 2CreatingandSavingaSimpleVisioDrawingIn This Chapterᮣ Creating a drawingᮣ Discovering the Visio drawing typesᮣ Opening and arranging stencilsᮣ Using the Pointer Toolᮣ Adding shapesᮣ Navigating a drawing successfullyᮣ Viewing drawings in different waysᮣ Saving your drawingᮣ Opening your drawingsVisio provides many ways to create diagrams of all types. However, aswith anything else, it pays to begin simply and move on to topics thatare more complex later. In this chapter, you find out the standard way tocreate a simple drawing, bring shapes in, and move around on the screen.More importantly, you discover more about the kinds of diagrams you cancreate. You also discover how to create drawings using different methods andhow to save a drawing and reopen it later.Creating a Drawing the Standard WayYou can create a diagram using several methods in Visio. This chapterreviews several techniques that you can use, but begins with the standardtechnique that you’ll use most often. Visio makes the standard way as easy aspossible by guiding you through the choices. The following steps describethe standard method for creating a diagram:
  44. 44. 1. Choose Start➪Programs➪Microsoft Office➪Microsoft Office Visio2007 if Visio isn’t already running.You see the opening Visio window, as shown in Figure 2-1.2. Click a category on the left side of the window (the example uses theSchedule category).Visio displays a sample of the types of drawings, diagrams, or chartsavailable in that category. Use the scroll bar, if necessary, to display allavailable templates.3. Click a template (the example uses the Calendar template).Visio shows details about the template you selected.4. Choose a Measurement Units option, and then click Create.Visio creates a new drawing page. One or more stencils open automati-cally on the left side of the screen.Now that you have a new diagram to use, try dragging one of the shapes fromthe Shape window to the Drawing window. The example uses the Month shapefound in the Calendar Shapes (US Units) stencil. You may see a Configure dialogbox when you drag and drop the shape. For example, the Month shape askswhich month and year you want to use, as shown in Figure 2-2.Figure 2-1:The Visioopeningscreendisplayseightcategoriesof diagramtypes.30 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 Basics
  45. 45. After you answer any configuration questions, Visio displays the shapeon-screen. Figure 2-3 shows a typical example of a calendar. You use othershapes in the Calendar Shapes (US Units) stencil to add important dates tothis calendar. Notice that the mouse pointer on the screen is an arrow. Visioautomatically selects the Pointer Tool on the Standard toolbar when youstart a new drawing. You discover more about using this tool later in thechapter.Figure 2-3:Visio sets upthe drawingpagespecificallyfor the typeof drawingyou choose.Figure 2-2:Shapes mayrequireconfigura-tioninformationbefore youcan usethem.31Chapter 2: Creating and Saving a Simple Visio Drawing
  46. 46. Understanding the VisioDrawing CategoriesVisio provides a vast array of templates, and you can download more tem-plates as you need them. In fact, you can create your own template when youdon’t find a template you can use anywhere else. The point is that there aremany templates to consider.To make the choice of template easier, Visio organizes them in categories.You choose the category you want to use and then a template within that cat-egory. Unfortunately, using categories can also hide the template you reallyneed. The following sections describe the various templates and tell youwhere to find them. The associated categories appear in parentheses behindthe template name. You can use this section as a guide to finding just the tem-plate you need.Active Directory (Network)The main purpose of the Active Directory template is to model an ActiveDirectory setup. It includes shapes that represent Active Directory objectssuch as domains, servers, and computers. However, you don’t need to limitthis template to Active Directory because it provides considerable flexibilityin designing other kinds of diagrams.The Active Directory Objects stencil includes standard security shapes suchas groups and users. In addition, the Exchange Objects stencil contains mail,Post Office Protocol (POP), and Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP)shapes you can use to model everything from an Exchange server setup toany common mail server. Chapter 4 describes how to locate stencils basedon a shape you remember or by loading the entire stencil.32 Part I: Starting with Visio 2007 BasicsWhere’s the template?You might think of a template as a visible formwith blanks or boxes that you fill in with infor-mation. In Visio, a template determines howVisio sets up a diagram and what stencils it pro-vides. For example, if you choose Charts andGraphs as your template (from the Businesscategory), Visio automatically performs the fol-lowing tasks (in no particular order):ߜ Opens three stencils (Backgrounds, Bordersand Titles, and Charting Shapes) on thescreen. These can appear in any order.ߜ Sets the drawing page size to 81⁄2 x 11, thepage orientation to Portrait, and the draw-ing scale to 1:1.ߜ Chooses an appropriate font, point size, andcolor.ߜ Chooses a variety of other settings such asline color and width, shadow position, textalignment, and bullet or numbering style.
  47. 47. If you regularly work with Active Directory, you might want to check outWindows Server 2003 For Dummies, by Ed Tittle and James Michael Steward(published by Wiley). Of course, this book discusses a lot more than justActive Directory. You’ll find out all of the details about Windows Server 2003.Find out more about this book at http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/DummiesTitle/productCd-0764516337.html.Audit Diagram (Business)The Audit Diagram template provides a means to diagram any auditing processincluding any type of accounting or financial management task. Many of theshapes are the same as those used for a flowchart. Of course, the meanings aredifferent in this context. If you’re new to the document Six Sigma strategy, youcan find some basic answers at http://www.isixsigma.com/library/content/six-sigma-newbie.asp. The ISO Standards Web site, at http://www.praxiom.com/, describes the International Standards Organization (ISO)9000 standard.This template also includes two stencils that come in handy for dressing upany diagram. The first is the Backgrounds stencil that contains an assortmentof background images for your diagram. The second is the Borders and Titlesstencil that contains shapes you can use to add pizzazz to any diagram. Athird stencil, Arrow Shapes, appears as part of a number of templates. It con-tains basic arrow shapes that you can use to show some type of flow betweentwo objects. You shouldn’t confuse the arrow shapes with an actual connec-tion, however. The arrow shapes help you show flow, while the connectionsshow actual relations between objects.Basic Diagram (General)Use this template for any general diagram. It includes basic shapes that youcan use to create any simple diagram. A good basic rule of thumb for this par-ticular template is that it comes in handy when one of the specific templateswon’t do the job. Visio doesn’t include any templates for creating a basicposter. You can choose to use one of the marketing-related templates to createa poster, but in some cases, the basic diagram offers you a little added flexibil-ity. Visio offers a vast array of special-purpose templates and you shouldalways use them whenever possible, but the Basic Diagram template lets youthink outside the box to create other diagrams that Microsoft didn’t consider.This template includes the Basic Shapes stencil, which contains shapes thatcome in handy for everything from creating a poster to adding emphasis toany other diagram. For example, instead of placing plain text in a particulardiagram, place it within a star. The added emphasis draws the viewer’s atten-tion to that area of the diagram and helps you make your point with greaterease.33Chapter 2: Creating and Saving a Simple Visio Drawing

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