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Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
Assistive Technology WebQuest
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Assistive Technology WebQuest

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  • 1. Assistive Technology In the Classroom
  • 2. <ul><li>Individual Education Programs (IEP) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Determined by a team of educators after a student has been evaluated </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Establishes goals in education, needs, how the student’s education will be executed, and the length of time the student requires help </li></ul></ul><ul><li>IEP Facts to Remember </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Programs are designed for an individual, not for all students with a certain need </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Good communication is essential </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Colleagues </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Each team member performs an important step </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Can help point out weaknesses and successes in an IEP </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Parents </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Have the right to be involved in every step of an IEP </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Can choose an advocate (representative) for their child if they are unfamiliar with special needs </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Students </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Have the right to self-determination (participating in forming an IEP) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Working with Special Needs Students
  • 3. <ul><li>Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensures that students get the appropriate education they deserve </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ The goal of IDEA is to ensure that each child is educated in the least restrictive environment possible, effort is made to help kids stay in a regular classroom” ( http:// kidshealth.org/parent/positive/learning/iep.html # ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Least Restrictive Environment for a Special Needs Student </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Should be similar to how a classroom for a student without disabilities would look </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Like a general education classroom, but has all appropriate assistive technology </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>No Child Left Behind Act </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Must be qualified to teach students with Special Needs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Need to research teaching strategies </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Goal: Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Special Needs students must make adequate progress on the same material as general education students </li></ul></ul></ul>Working with Special Needs Students
  • 4. <ul><li>General Education Classroom </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most argue Special Needs students need time in a general education classroom to develop both academic and social skills ( Inclusion ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time spent in general education classes is determined by the IEP </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Resource Rooms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Where students with special needs are taught with a variety of resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Separate from a general education class </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students do not spend all day in a resource room </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Separate Classes incorporate community time when special needs students interact with others for a certain amount of time </li></ul>Environment
  • 5. <ul><li>Low Technology (No Technology) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Requires no technology use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: rubber pencil grip, study carrel </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mid-Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Requires some technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: tape recorder, calculator </li></ul></ul><ul><li>High Technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Utilizes complex, multifunction technology and usually include a computer and associated software” ( http://www.ericdigests.org/2003-1/assistive.htm ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples: touch screen computer, voice recognition software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Used in drill-and-practice programs (mostly with special needs students) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Assistive Technology is important in an inclusive classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Areas of instruction in which AT can assist students (Lahm and Morissette) </li></ul><ul><li> – Organization – Note taking – Writing </li></ul><ul><li> – Academic productivity – Cognitive assistance </li></ul><ul><li>– Access to reference and general educational materials </li></ul><ul><li> ( http://www.ericdigests.org/2003-1/assistive.htm ) </li></ul>Types of Assistive Technology High Technology
  • 6. <ul><li>Common Symptoms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Impulsivity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus and listening problems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Disruptive behavior </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Impatience </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Related Issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conduct Disorders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mood Disorders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Anxiety </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning Disabilities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Classroom Needs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Routine </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Goals and rewards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Minimal distractions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supervision and rules </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/learning/adhd.html?tracking=P_RelatedArticle# </li></ul></ul>Students with ADHD
  • 7. <ul><li>Desk Carrel </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Three-sided cardboard divider </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sits on the student’s desk to block distraction of peers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Computers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can do a variety of activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have visual components that will keep students entertained </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Touch Screen Computers ( http://www.synapseadaptive.com/edmark/prod/tw/default.htm ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Allow students to be even more involved in activities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Can be expensive </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Smart Boards (Interactive Whiteboards) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers can record lessons for students to review later </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students can actively participate by writing on the board or telling the teacher and watching him or her write the response </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students will be enthusiastic to learn with gadgets like the Smart Board </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reading Activity with Starfall ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_t0oZP7tJjA&amp;feature=related ) </li></ul></ul>Resources for Students with ADHD
  • 8. <ul><li>Creating Character Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>By Elizabeth Potash </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/creating-character-blogs-1169.html?tab=4#tabs </li></ul><ul><li>Involves a variety of activities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Direct instruction by the teacher </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Computer use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Creating blogs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student involvement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Peer evaluation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Viewing Party </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Assessments and Reflections </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Students improve their literacy and writing abilities </li></ul><ul><li>Another way to understand a variety of texts (novels, plays, poems, short stories) </li></ul>Example Lesson for Students with ADHD
  • 9. <ul><li>Students struggle academically because of their problems understanding language </li></ul><ul><li>Some hearing impaired students are </li></ul><ul><li>immature socially </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can’t understand when multiple </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>conversation occur around them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of behavioral skills, which children </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>learn from watching and listening to others </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Learning Styles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Speech reading - watching teacher’s and peers lips as they speak </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Visual learners </li></ul></ul>Students with Hearing Impairments
  • 10. <ul><li>Personal Frequency Modulation (FM) systems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The teacher wears a microphone and the student wears a receiver </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can amplify all sounds in a classroom, which can be distracting </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Note Takers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Because students need to watch the lesson, they </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>are allowed to have a note taker, if needed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Computerized Speech Recognition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A computer makes a Word document out of speech </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Benefits both the hearing impaired student and the rest of the class </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Hearing Aids </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cochlear Implants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hearing Aids (hook on the outside of the ear and are not permanent) </li></ul></ul>Resources for Hearing Impaired Students
  • 11. <ul><li>Face the class when speaking </li></ul><ul><li>Use an overhead and other visual tools </li></ul><ul><li>When having a hard time understanding the student </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask them to repeat themselves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use a pencil and paper if necessary </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Learn sign language, if desired </li></ul><ul><li>Be patient in dealing with all students </li></ul>Teaching the Hearing Impaired
  • 12. <ul><li>A Poem of Possibilities: Thinking about the Future </li></ul><ul><li>By Susanne Rubenstein </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/poem-possibilities-thinking-about-943.html?tab=4#tabs </li></ul><ul><li>Students can visually understand the poem and see the teacher discuss it in front of the class </li></ul><ul><li>Develop writing skills </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Writing their own poem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Practicing revising and reference skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Understand writing for different audiences </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Student involvement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can create bulletin boards, possibly with others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn to assess their efforts and could interact with other through assessment </li></ul></ul>Example Lesson for Hearing Impaired Students
  • 13. <ul><li>Alternative Book Formats for Struggling Readers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Large print books </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Brail Books </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Symbolized Text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio Books </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Free Electronic Books </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MobiPocket </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Computer Books </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Portable Word Processor to Aid in Writing and Spelling </li></ul><ul><ul><li>AlphaSmart Technology (AlphaSmart 3000, Neo, Dana) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Laser PC6 (Perfect Solutions) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CalcuScribe </li></ul></ul>Other Resources for Special Needs Students AlphaSmart 3000
  • 14. <ul><li>A High-Interest Novel Helps Struggling Readers Confront Bullying in Schools </li></ul><ul><li>By Cathleen Benson Quinn </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/high-interest-novel-helps-390.html?tab=4#tabs </li></ul><ul><li>Can incorporate a variety of texts (large print books, brail books, electronic books, etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Worksheets aid in understanding texts </li></ul><ul><li>Involves group activities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reading the text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating a poem, song, poster, artwork, or cheer on the subject </li></ul></ul><ul><li>By reading a text applicable to their lives, students will learn more and show enthusiasm for the subject and for reading </li></ul>Example Lesson for Struggling Readers
  • 15. <ul><li>Become a Character: Adjectives, Character Traits, and Perspective </li></ul><ul><li>By Traci Gardner </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/become-character-adjectives-character-168.html?tab=4#tabs </li></ul><ul><li>Students write in a variety of ways </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use the computer to create a Character Traits Interactive Chart </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write a Character Diary entry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assess themselves and reflect on the project </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Students can use almost any assistive writing technology in this project, including: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>AlphaSmart devices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Word Processor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spell Checker </li></ul></ul>Example Lesson for Improving Writing and Spelling
  • 16. <ul><li>Two Major Types of Written Expression Problems: Product and Process Problems </li></ul><ul><li>Common Problems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Need help focusing on their tasks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Memory problems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trouble organizing and interpreting oral and visual information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May lack reasoning skills needed for reading and writing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many are passive learners , which can prevent independent learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Do not believe in their abilities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lack problem solving skills </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cannot tell when strategies are used </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Academic Survival Skills </li></ul><ul><li> “ Skills needed to succeed in school, including regular and punctual </li></ul><ul><li>attendance, organization, task completion, independence, motivation, </li></ul><ul><li>and appropriate social skills” (Friend and Bursuck,521) </li></ul>Tips for Teaching Student with Learning Disabilities
  • 17. <ul><li>When working with special needs students, lessons can be altered and assistive technology is necessary </li></ul><ul><li>Students are entitled to receive whatever assistive technology they need to learn and develop skills </li></ul><ul><li>A well thought out IEP is essential to a special needs student’s education </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher should research different types of assistive technology and incorporate a variety of resources in the classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Every student is different and deserves respect and the teacher’s best efforts in learning </li></ul><ul><li>More Tips on Teaching Special Needs Children </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDmUdZwwq2I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sF6An0465g </li></ul></ul>Summary
  • 18. <ul><li>Bursuck, William ; Friend, Marilyn. Including Students with Special Needs: A Practical Guide for Classroom Teachers . 5 th ed. New Jersey, Pearson: 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.rjcooper.com/cole/mon2.jpg </li></ul><ul><li>http://sped.peabody.k12.ma.us/zoomtext.JPG </li></ul><ul><li>http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3056/2717696876_9a25c45616.jpg?v=0 </li></ul><ul><li>http://images.sodahead.com/polls/000228635/polls_no_child_left_behind_2327_198419_poll_xlarge.jpeg </li></ul><ul><li>http://svconline.com/mag/609SVC_feat_DSC03543_1.jpg </li></ul><ul><li>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assistive_technology </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.pharmacytimes.com/issue/pharmacy/2009/2009-06/RxfocusADHD-0609 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_t0oZP7tJjA&amp;feature=related </li></ul><ul><li>http://caineassociates.com/products/images/carrel.jpg </li></ul>Bibliography
  • 19. <ul><li>http://www.zenchannels.com/eportfolio/uploaded_images/google-blog-example-729119.gif </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ntid.rit.edu/current/audiology/images/services.jpg </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.asha.org/public/hearing/treatment/assist_tech.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://seattlecentral.edu/users/aslarticulation/images/StudentsASL.jpg </li></ul><ul><li>http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_q-UM-CmvIiw/SArX5ySwQRI/AAAAAAAAAPc/sD4EIotNYDY/s320/deb+modeling+writing.JPG </li></ul><ul><li>http://images01.tzimg.com/cache/h3w4/500_1188336991_732913_69070282.jpg </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.indiana.edu/~iuadapts/img/alphasmart-large.jpg </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.gpat.org/resources.aspx?PageReq=GPATImp </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDmUdZwwq2I </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sF6An0465g </li></ul>Bibliography

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