Systems Thinking Powerpoint for

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  • Use example of iced tea jug filled with water – stock
  • Let’s say you have a room with 20 people in it (stock = people in the room). There are people entering the room (inflow) and people leaving the room (outflow). If the number of people entering the room goes down, what happens to the Pour water from one cup to the jug; then out of the jug into another cup of waterKey stock concepts:Correlation heuristic is a common misconception
  • Systems Thinking Powerpoint for

    1. 1. Systems thinking and animation Juliette Rooney-Varga, Ph.D. CAM Project PI
    2. 2. http://cleanet.org/cced_media/cam_tv/index.html
    3. 3. Systems thinking • Perspective/approach centered on the system level • Synthesis, rather than reductionism • Framework for understanding complex, dynamic systems that cross disciplinary boundaries (climate change!) • Often leads to interesting stories
    4. 4. System elements: Stocks • Stock (noun); something that can accumulate or decline – Physical things – Non-physical things • You can assess what their level is at any point in time
    5. 5. System elements: Flows • Movement of things or information • Occur over time – if time stops, flows stop – E.g., people entering a room, water flowing into a tub, CO2 emissions
    6. 6. System elements: Feedback • Relationship or connection between system elements
    7. 7. System behavior can be nonintuitive • Stock-flow failure ?? debt deficit time
    8. 8. System behavior can be nonintuitive • Stock-flow failure • Non-linear behavior: exponential growth, thresholds, tipping points Temperature Arctic is warming 2-3 x faster than global average (R) Albedo Arctic sea ice extent
    9. 9. System behavior can be nonintuitive • Stock-flow failure • Non-linear behavior: exponential growth, thresholds, tipping points • Time delays
    10. 10. • How many times would a 2 micrometer bacterium need to divide to be able to form a line around the Earth’s equator? • 34 times
    11. 11. Reinforcing (positive) feedback + C + A R + R + B
    12. 12. Reinforcing (positive) feedback + C - Even number of “-” relationships A R + R - B
    13. 13. Balancing (negative) feedback - C - Odd number of “-” relationships A R - - B
    14. 14. Public understandin + Students knowledgeable about cc Time CC education efforts + + (+) Public support for education policy + Public understanding + Student communication about cc beyond classroom
    15. 15. Note that: “S” = same or + “O” = opposite or S “R” = reinforcing or positive “B” = balancing or negative Students knowledgeable about cc CC education efforts S S (R) Public support for education policy S Public understanding S Student communication about cc beyond classroom
    16. 16. Causal loop diagram exercise
    17. 17. Why animation? • Depiction of abstract concepts and systems • Dynamic • Readily integrated with science content – Can be culminating assignment of in-depth content research • Little production and post-production time needed
    18. 18. Adjust animation to fit your needs • Pre-production: – Degree of scaffolding can vary easily, e.g., • Grades 8-12: Provide a scenario for students • Higher Ed: Ask students to research primary literature or create an animation that captures concepts of their own scientific research • Systems thinking component can be adjusted – from simple causal loop diagram to computer simulation – Research, diagram or model system, write narration, create storyboard
    19. 19. Adjust animation to fit your needs • Production: – Paper- or clay-mation (or other malleable objects) – Whiteboard or illustrated animation – Computer animation (much more timeintensive) • Post-production: – Little editing necessary
    20. 20. Conclusions • Systems thinking can provide a framework for understanding complex, dynamic aspects of climate change • Animation is a natural fit for learning about dynamic systems • Actively engages students in thinking about interconnections and change over time • Focus is on pre-production • Can be effective jig-saw approach

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