Reviewing Successful Proposals and Developing a Proposal Idea of One's Own_WED_100_beane

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  • 10-30 +/- proposals at once on top of their regular workDon’t know you, your strengths, your institution
  • Do you want time, grad student support, help, instrument, something to help you get promoted, funds
  • Reviewing Successful Proposals and Developing a Proposal Idea of One's Own_WED_100_beane

    1. 1. Reviewing Successful Proposals and Developing a Proposal Idea of One's Own Rachel Beane with contributions from Richelle Allen-King, Heather Macdonald & Cathy Manduca
    2. 2. Critical Pieces of a Proposal • A clearly articulated, doable project • State hypothesis or research questions clearly • A well-formulated argument for why this is important, how this fits into previous work, and why you are the one to do it • A definite plan for implementation • A track record • Preliminary data/previous publications • Pilot projects • Partnerships with recognized experts
    3. 3. Proposal Review • What are the criteria? • NSF • Criterion 1: Intellectual Merit • Criterion 2: Broader Impacts • Program Guidelines • Your institution • American Chemical Society, NASA, NOAA, Dept of Education, Dept of Energy, Dept of Transportation, ONR, EPA, US Geological Survey EDMAP, … • Who are the reviewers?
    4. 4. Reviewing Successful Proposals
    5. 5. Writing a Strong Proposal • Grant writing as a persuasive essay • What do you want to do? • Why is it important? • How will you do it? • Why are you the best person to do this? • What do you need to succeed? • Clear, concise, compelling • Follow the rules
    6. 6. • Know what you want and why you want it • Avoid upsetting reviewers - take care to cite relevant sources, give credit where due • Approach it as a 'hypothesis testing' proposal rather than as a 'prove something' proposal. • Contact relevant program officer – questions about ideas, mechanics – before submission Words of Wisdom
    7. 7. This afternoon’s options • Develop a an idea you have for a project (for either internal or external funding) and then participate in a pre-proposal peer feedback discussion • Goal/hypothesis/question • Significance/importance • Plan (short outline about what you will do) • Read successful proposals on your own • On-site proposal collection • Proposal collection on the Cutting Edge website http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/earlycareer/research/funding.html

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