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A Scientific Approach to Achieving     Learning in Your Course       Leilani Arthurs       Department of Earth & Atmospher...
Welcome!Every participant will have a participant number.We’ll count off.Please remember what your number is.  L. Arthurs;...
What kind of institution is closest to the kind ofinstitution that you teach at?A.    Elementary to Middle schoolB.    Hig...
In which department or discipline do you primarilyteach your course(s)?A.    Geology / Geoscience / Earth ScienceB.    Geo...
How much do you already know about developinglearning goals, classroom activities, and assessments?A. I consider myself an...
What is one thing that you hope to get out of this     workshop?1                                               142       ...
What does “effective learning” mean to you?  L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop   Slide 7 of 19
What is your target course (e.g. Historical Geology,     Environmental Geochemistry, Intro Astronomy)?1                   ...
A basic scientific approach to achieving learning in yourcourse involves a systematic three-step process.    1. Set & comm...
A learning goal is a statement of what students should be able to do and at what level.                 Evaluation        ...
These statements are written with specific language(esp. verbs) and are assessable.Students will be able to …A. understand...
LGs can be written to address different levels of thecourse structure. Course-level LGs provide the “Big Picture” for the...
LGs can be written to address different levels of the course structure.  Course-level LGs provide the “Big Picture” for t...
What are some examples that you all came up with for     course- and topic-level LGs? “Students will be able to ….”C = cou...
After establishing learning goals for your students, it’s time to ask: What can I do to help my students achieve these lea...
After establishing learning goals for your students, it’s time to ask: What can I do to help my students achieve these lea...
Activities that enhance student learning share several common characteristics.• They are associated with a specific learni...
After setting goals and structuring learning activities to aid in their attainment, it’s time to ask: To what extent did s...
After setting goals and structuring learning activities to aid in their attainment, it’s time to ask: To what extent did s...
The results of assessments can help to inform you on matters such as …• To what extent your students achieved the learning...
Aligning these three aspects of a course can be aniterative and energy/time intensive process, but isextremely worthwhile ...
Thank you for your participation in this workshop!                              Questions?  L. Arthurs; University of Nebr...
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  • Welcome, everyone! Before we begin, I’d like to learn a little more about who’s participating in this workshop.
  • Transcript of "A Scientific Approach to Achieving Learning in your Courses"

    1. 1. A Scientific Approach to Achieving Learning in Your Course Leilani Arthurs Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    2. 2. Welcome!Every participant will have a participant number.We’ll count off.Please remember what your number is. L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 2 of 19
    3. 3. What kind of institution is closest to the kind ofinstitution that you teach at?A. Elementary to Middle schoolB. High schoolC. 2-year collegeD. 4-year primarily teaching collegeE. 4-year research university L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 3 of 19
    4. 4. In which department or discipline do you primarilyteach your course(s)?A. Geology / Geoscience / Earth ScienceB. Geography / Environmental StudiesC. Meteorology / ClimatologyD. Astronomy / PhysicsE. Chemistry L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 4 of 19
    5. 5. How much do you already know about developinglearning goals, classroom activities, and assessments?A. I consider myself an expert in these areas, and I could totally be giving this workshop! B. I have a high level of familiarity with these, and am always trying to learn more about them.C. I have a high level of familiarity with 1 or 2 of these areas, but not all 3.D. I have a modest understanding of these areas.E. Developing these 3 things myself is new to me. L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 5 of 19
    6. 6. What is one thing that you hope to get out of this workshop?1 142 153 164 175 186 197 208 219 2210 2311 2412 2513 26 L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 6 of 19
    7. 7. What does “effective learning” mean to you? L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 7 of 19
    8. 8. What is your target course (e.g. Historical Geology, Environmental Geochemistry, Intro Astronomy)?1 142 153 164 175 186 197 208 219 2210 2311 2412 2513 26 L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 8 of 19
    9. 9. A basic scientific approach to achieving learning in yourcourse involves a systematic three-step process. 1. Set & comm. 2. Use activities learning goals for to help students self & students achieve goals 3. Assess whether students achieved goals L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 9 of 19
    10. 10. A learning goal is a statement of what students should be able to do and at what level. Evaluation Increasing levels of sophistication Internalizing Synthesis Analysis Organizing Application Valuing Comprehension Responding Knowledge ReceivingLevels of intellectual behavior, Levels of attitudinal behavior,Bloom’s taxonomy (1956). Krathwohl’s taxonomy (1973). L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 10 of 19
    11. 11. These statements are written with specific language(esp. verbs) and are assessable.Students will be able to …A. understand how surface properties affect albedo.B. appreciate the connection between the chemistry of Earth’s atmosphere and Earth’s climate.C. define latent heat.D. apply knowledge of feedbacks to predict possible climate outcomes given a hypothetical scenario.E. compare temporal CO2, CH4, and temperature data and interpret what they mean. Useful Action Words: http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 11 of 19
    12. 12. LGs can be written to address different levels of thecourse structure. Course-level LGs provide the “Big Picture” for the overall desired learning outcomes after taking your course. Topic-level LGs are behaviors students should be able to do after learning about a specific topic. L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 12 of 19
    13. 13. LGs can be written to address different levels of the course structure.  Course-level LGs provide the “Big Picture” for the overall desired learning outcomes after taking your course.  Topic-level LGs are behaviors students should be able to do after learning about a specific topic.1. Take out a piece of paper.2. If you haven’t already, write the name of target course.3. Write 3 overall course-level LGs for your target course.4. List 3 topics addressed in your target course.5. For each topic, write 1-3 topic-level LGs. L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 12 of 19
    14. 14. What are some examples that you all came up with for course- and topic-level LGs? “Students will be able to ….”C = course-level LG; T = topic-level LGC:C:C:T:T:T: L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 13 of 19
    15. 15. After establishing learning goals for your students, it’s time to ask: What can I do to help my students achieve these learning goals? Traditional lecture vs. Transformed teaching Many options for transformed teaching L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 14 of 19
    16. 16. After establishing learning goals for your students, it’s time to ask: What can I do to help my students achieve these learning goals? Traditional lecture vs. Transformed teaching Many options for transformed teaching • ConcepTests & peer instruction (Mazur, 1997) • Contrasting cases (Swartz, 1998) • Authentic performance tasks (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005) • Process-oriented guided-inquiry learning (Hanson, 2006) • Lecture tutorials (e.g. Prather et al., 2008; Kortz & Smay, 2010) • Integration of instructional technology: GE, sims, clickers.. • and more! L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 14 of 19
    17. 17. Activities that enhance student learning share several common characteristics.• They are associated with a specific learning goal(s).• They are based on a single well thought out and well designed question or series of questions.• They engage students beyond the lowest levels of intellectual or attitudinal behaviors.• They promote communication and discussion between students about course concepts.• They are spring boards for instructor-facilitated class discussion about students’ current level of understanding. L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 15 of 19
    18. 18. After setting goals and structuring learning activities to aid in their attainment, it’s time to ask: To what extent did students achieve the learning goals? Formative Assessments • Done throughout the semester • Often not graded • Informs instructional decisions • e.g. CATs (Angelo & Cross, 1993) Summative Assessments • Done at the end of semester, module, chapter • Usually graded • Generally, does not inform instructional decisions (for that semester/term) • e.g. exams, final projects, final papers L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 16 of 19
    19. 19. After setting goals and structuring learning activities to aid in their attainment, it’s time to ask: To what extent did students achieve the learning goals? Formative Assessments • Done throughout the semester • Often not graded • Informs instructional decisions • e.g. CATs (Angelo & Cross, 1993) Summative Assessments • Done at the end of semester, module, chapter • Usually graded • Generally, does not inform instructional decisions (for that semester/term) • e.g. exams, final projects, final papers L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 16 of 19
    20. 20. The results of assessments can help to inform you on matters such as …• To what extent your students achieved the learning goals• How effective the activities and classroom practices were at facilitating student learning• Whether and how you might revise one or more activities• Whether and how you might revise a learning goal(s)• Where there may be room to improve the alignment between what you expect students to learn, how you help them meet those expectations, and how you assess their learning L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 17 of 19
    21. 21. Aligning these three aspects of a course can be aniterative and energy/time intensive process, but isextremely worthwhile in terms of helping students learn. 1. Set & comm. 2. Use activities learning goals for to help students self & students achieve goals 3. Assess whether students achieved goals Be patient with yourself and have fun when undertaking this process!  L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 18 of 19
    22. 22. Thank you for your participation in this workshop! Questions? L. Arthurs; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; CLEAN Workshop Slide 19 of 19
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