THE FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE

        Supporting Your Student
   Through the Transition to University
OBJECTIVES
 Give you an idea what your student’s first year will look
  like
 Address concerns and misconceptions
 Prov...
PRESENTATION OUTLINE
 Student Development Theory
 Student Transition
 Myth Or Fact
 Questions
Student Development Theory

A f r a m e w o r k d e s ig n e d t o u n d e r s t a n d y o u r
                s t u d e n...
CHICKERING’S THEORY OF
STUDENT DEVELOPMENT
 Provides for a better understanding of the development of
  a traditional uni...
SEVEN VECTORS OF
DEVELOPMENT
 Vector 1: Developing Competence
 Vector 2: Managing Emotions
 Vector 3: Moving through Au...
First Year Transition

       C o m m o n t r a n s it io n s e n c o u n t e r e d b y
s t u d e n t s t h r o u g h o u ...
TRANSITIONS

 Your student will face adjustments and transitions in the
  following areas:
    – Academic
    – Social
  ...
SEPTEMBER

 New environment
 Orienting themselves (academic, social, personal)
 New academic expectations
 Time manage...
OCTOBER

 Keeping up with school
 Balancing
 Roommate differences
 Thanksgiving
 Relationships



 A gentle reminder...
NOVEMBER

 Changes in eating and sleeping habits
 Colds and flu are common
 Looking forward to going home
 Academic fe...
DECEMBER

 Balancing academic and other responsibilities intensifies
 Money
 Increased independence leads to a change i...
JANUARY

 Time of reflection, adjustment, renewed enthusiasm
 Comfortable with surroundings
 Academic expectations
 La...
FEBRUARY

 Volunteer recruiting and summer job workshops
 Reading week is actually for reading
 Money
 Students should...
MARCH

 Preparing for final exams
 Major exams and essays
 Finding niche on campus
 Pressure to improve grades
 Start...
APRIL

 High stake exams
 Closure for residence floor
 Not wanting to study in good weather
 Anxiety
 Living arrangem...
 Otta aha thelo e t s tingrink in thew rld
      w s       ng s ka                o

 C rle niteisatyp o ro k na e a r C...
Myth Or Fact

S h e d d i n g S o m e L ig h t o n U n iv e r s it y M y t h s
Laptops and printers are not
mandatory at university.
 FACT:
    – 583 desktops and 100+ laptops available for student
  ...
In order to take classes, students
need not be on campus.
 FACT:
    – Alternatives to coming to campus
    – CUTV broadc...
Since university is so large, I am on
my own academically.
 FACT:
   – Office hours are held by faculty and teaching assi...
In University, students are only a
number.
 FACT:
   – Hundreds of ways to get involved on campus!
   – Clubs & Societies...
Students only have 15 hours of class
per week, and therefore, only 15
hours of schoolwork.
 FACT:
   – 2:1 ratio means th...
Carleton is an island.

 FACT:
   – Carleton is connected to the Ottawa community by
     four bus routes and the O-Train...
There is nothing to do in Ottawa.

 FACT:
   – Museums, art galleries and other attractions
   – Festivals and concerts
 ...
The Parents Campaign
THE PARENTS CAMPAIGN


 It is an annual initiative
 Invitations to lectures hosted by Carleton Alumni in cities
  across...
PARENTS MAKE THINGS HAPPEN


 In 2008, parents gave 7% of all gifts to Carleton University


                        Gift...
PRIORTY PROJECT


 Student Services is the priority project for this year’s
  Parents Campaign
 Student Services provide...
KylieP tric
                a k
      Annua GivingOffic r
           l           e
De a e o Unive ity Ad nc m nt
  p rtm n...
Questions?
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The First Year Experience

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The First Year Experience

  1. 1. THE FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE Supporting Your Student Through the Transition to University
  2. 2. OBJECTIVES  Give you an idea what your student’s first year will look like  Address concerns and misconceptions  Provide you information to help your student succeed
  3. 3. PRESENTATION OUTLINE  Student Development Theory  Student Transition  Myth Or Fact  Questions
  4. 4. Student Development Theory A f r a m e w o r k d e s ig n e d t o u n d e r s t a n d y o u r s t u d e n t ’ s b e h a v io u r
  5. 5. CHICKERING’S THEORY OF STUDENT DEVELOPMENT  Provides for a better understanding of the development of a traditional university student  Serves as a guide for parents and academic partners on how to best support an individual student  Chickering & Reisser (1993) focused on seven developmental areas
  6. 6. SEVEN VECTORS OF DEVELOPMENT  Vector 1: Developing Competence  Vector 2: Managing Emotions  Vector 3: Moving through Autonomy to Interdependence  Vector 4: Developing Mature Interpersonal Relationships  Vector 5: Establishing Identity  Vector 6: Developing Purpose  Vector 7: Developing Integrity
  7. 7. First Year Transition C o m m o n t r a n s it io n s e n c o u n t e r e d b y s t u d e n t s t h r o u g h o u t t h e ir f ir s t y e a r o f s t u d y in h ig h e r e d u c a t io n
  8. 8. TRANSITIONS  Your student will face adjustments and transitions in the following areas: – Academic – Social – Personal
  9. 9. SEPTEMBER  New environment  Orienting themselves (academic, social, personal)  New academic expectations  Time management  Homesickness  Making new friends
  10. 10. OCTOBER  Keeping up with school  Balancing  Roommate differences  Thanksgiving  Relationships  A gentle reminder that these experiences are a normal part of life can go a long way at reassuring your student at this point in the semester
  11. 11. NOVEMBER  Changes in eating and sleeping habits  Colds and flu are common  Looking forward to going home  Academic feedback is received  Changing majors  Encourage your student to make use of the facilities and resources on campus that can assist them in developing a healthy, rewarding lifestyle
  12. 12. DECEMBER  Balancing academic and other responsibilities intensifies  Money  Increased independence leads to a change in family dynamics  Burn out
  13. 13. JANUARY  Time of reflection, adjustment, renewed enthusiasm  Comfortable with surroundings  Academic expectations  Lack of physical activity and time outdoors  Adapting back to study mode  This is a good time to seek out academic support from various services on campus
  14. 14. FEBRUARY  Volunteer recruiting and summer job workshops  Reading week is actually for reading  Money  Students should start thinking about next year’s living arrangements
  15. 15. MARCH  Preparing for final exams  Major exams and essays  Finding niche on campus  Pressure to improve grades  Start applying for summer jobs  Start looking for jobs on campus for next year
  16. 16. APRIL  High stake exams  Closure for residence floor  Not wanting to study in good weather  Anxiety  Living arrangements  Think about summer courses
  17. 17.  Otta aha thelo e t s tingrink in thew rld w s ng s ka o  C rle niteisatyp o ro k na e a r C rle n a to e f c m d fte a to 2 Truths and a Myth Unive ity. rs  P re c n livein re id nc a nts a s e e 17
  18. 18. Myth Or Fact S h e d d i n g S o m e L ig h t o n U n iv e r s it y M y t h s
  19. 19. Laptops and printers are not mandatory at university.  FACT: – 583 desktops and 100+ laptops available for student use – Computers are available in 10 different campus buildings – Over 80 software applications – Access to private file storage – Wireless internet across campus – Pay printing available at most labs – E-kiosks available in many buildings  If you are buying a computer, visit www.carleton.ca/ccs
  20. 20. In order to take classes, students need not be on campus.  FACT: – Alternatives to coming to campus – CUTV broadcasts on TV, online – E-kiosks available in many buildings – Over 60 credit courses each year  For more information, visit www.cutv.carleton.ca
  21. 21. Since university is so large, I am on my own academically.  FACT: – Office hours are held by faculty and teaching assistants – Lab instructors are available – Writing Tutorial Centre, Math Tutorial Centre, Science Student Success Centre – PASS, Tutor Referral Service – Learning Support Services
  22. 22. In University, students are only a number.  FACT: – Hundreds of ways to get involved on campus! – Clubs & Societies (160+) – Intramural sports, competitive club teams, varsity programs – Campus Wide Lectures, Speakers & Events – Student Politics – Employment Opportunities
  23. 23. Students only have 15 hours of class per week, and therefore, only 15 hours of schoolwork.  FACT: – 2:1 ratio means that students should spend two hours preparing for every one hour of class – Arts, Public Affairs and Business programs: 15 hours of class + 30 hours of prep = 45 hours – Science, Math and Engineering programs: 15 hours of class + 30 hours of prep + 15 hours of labs = 60 hours
  24. 24. Carleton is an island.  FACT: – Carleton is connected to the Ottawa community by four bus routes and the O-Train – Free shuttle bus to University of Ottawa – Carleton has everything a small town would have – Carleton is self-contained so there is no through traffic – South Keys plaza is ten minutes away by O-Train and has a movie theatre, restaurants, a grocery store and other stores
  25. 25. There is nothing to do in Ottawa.  FACT: – Museums, art galleries and other attractions – Festivals and concerts – Live theatre – Different shopping districts – Outdoor activities – bike trails, the canal, skiing
  26. 26. The Parents Campaign
  27. 27. THE PARENTS CAMPAIGN  It is an annual initiative  Invitations to lectures hosted by Carleton Alumni in cities across Canada  E-newsletter distributed by the Student Experience Office  Fundraising support
  28. 28. PARENTS MAKE THINGS HAPPEN  In 2008, parents gave 7% of all gifts to Carleton University Gifts - 2008 Student Aid 13% 2% Academics & Research 56% Infrastructure 29% Special Projects
  29. 29. PRIORTY PROJECT  Student Services is the priority project for this year’s Parents Campaign  Student Services provides additional funding for projects like: – Community Service Learning – The Leadership Development Program – The Writing/Math Tutorial Service and – Learning Support Services
  30. 30. KylieP tric a k Annua GivingOffic r l e De a e o Unive ity Ad nc m nt p rtm nt f rs va e e (6 ) 5 0 6 0 e 13 2 -2 0 , xt:12 0 3 Kylie a k@ c rle n.c _p tric a to a C rle n.c /a a to a nnua lfund 3 0
  31. 31. Questions?

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