YSL MANIFESTO SS2011
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  • 1. yves saint laurent spring/summer 2011 edition viiirevelations or triggers for you? When we reinvent the future we somehowrebuild the fragments of the past…sp: In that sense I don’t really have any particular heroes – there are so manyfrom the past that linger – but I always think about the masters and I cango from philosophers to artists, from writers to musicians. I fell in love withthe idea of manifestos and with the term itself, because the word ‘manifesto’implied a sense of breaking through something while still being connectedto and aware of how things are today. In terms of the format, I didn’t really relate to any historical manifestosI’ve seen because my medium is fashion… There is fashion photography inthe manifesto so even the idea of showing the pictures larger than they ap-pear in normal magazines was part of the act of manifesting.huo: It has occurred to me that manifestos in the 20th century were verymasculine. The Romanian artist Arthur Segal said that he considered thisquality of manifestos to indeed be a feature of the 20th century—noisy andmuscular compared to what would follow. The 21st century manifesto wouldhave more accommodation, more dialogue, it would be more conversational. sp: Yes. I’ve been influenced by the 1920s and 1930s, when women began to come to the fore and be accepted as equal, especially in the arts and in philosophy. I’m very conscious of how macho our world is. Conceiving a collection is an abstract process and this abstraction becomes concrete whenI listen to and translate the total admiration I have for women. The term‘manifesto’ is very fruitful and also very male, so to see it take a feminine shape, to use it as a tool to communicate femininity, I believe that is very interesting.huo: You have said that often fashion has to do with the invention of newrules, and that sometimes means breaking other rules. The manifesto is alsoabout a moment of breaking or inventing new rules. From a conversation between hans ulrich obrist, Co-Director, The Serpentine Gallery, London and stefano pilati, Creative Director, Yves Saint Laurent
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  • 3. yves saint laurent – manifesto viii – spring/summer 2011 yves saint laurent – manifesto viii – spring/summer 2011 interview – hans ulrich obrist / stefano pilati interview – hans ulrich obrist / stefano pilati yves saint laurent – manifesto viii – spring/summer 2011 interview – hans ulrich obrist / stefano pilati influence I try always to avoid to be aggressive in what I do. But some- proclaiming what is wrong with the world, what could change the world. times, even if I accept certain limits and a retro taste, I go for it anyway. I was wondering whether we could cover that idea of a manifesto: saying hans ulrich obrist: The manifesto has been used as a document of intent not what you like but what you dislike. What are your manifestos against? by the avant-garde in the 20th century. With the hundredth anniversary huo: How do you think fashion shows can be both a medium and a mani- of Marinetti’s Futurist Manifesto and with so many other manifestos— festo – because each time it is a different show, a new theme. It’s fascinating sp: Against aggressivity, against exclusivity, against classification, against Dada, for example, in the early 20th century, and in the 1960s we had how you use fashion as a medium and how much it has changed since the isolation, against introversion, against always looking at oneself. This is the new avant-garde—all over the world we have manifestos again… It’s 1980s and 90s – fashion shows are exhibitions, they are inventions. How what it comes to in the end. Fashion can give rise to all of these things and different now because perhaps it’s less about political alliances and more have you seen the shows change over time? How do you see them now? it shouldn’t, especially today. about strategic or loose alliances. It seems that if we have manifestos now they’ll be singular, individual manifestos. I’m curious about how you see sp: The fashion show generates the manifesto but the manifesto is not the manifesto in the 21st century, and how you connect it to the historic necessarily an extension of it. In my first shows for YSL, I included produc- and near avant-garde. tion elements that could emphasize and support the show conceptually. These were mass productions at a great expense and when you see how stefano pilati: Well of course I had those references in mind. At the same fashion shows were in the 1960s, 70s or 80s, they seem much more hon- time there is a general lack of ideology and it’s very difficult for a fashion est somehow because it was about a designer working with models and designer to be connected to a movement. I approached the last manifesto that was all. People were interested in that and exclusively in that. Last in an objective rather than a subjective way since the heritage of the brand season was, in a way, an expression of this approach. I chose a location that was extremely important in the evolution of the last three decades, from is very French, very simple, a series of salons with chairs, and I presented the 1960s up until the 1990s. the clothes in the simplest way possible. We are in an era of spectacle First of all you need to question whether it’s interesting or not to be and ostentation, so going back to something simple was, I felt, absolutely political about fashion, or if instead you wish to reinforce a message to people refreshing. I think this is what is needed today and I think it will that is simply about looking good and projecting a positive energy about continue until I work out how to conceive the old-fashioned show differently. yourself. I was no longer interested in thinking of fashion in an elitist way. Being intellectual or conceptual about the show definitely doesn’t work Everything I picked up from the manifestos of the past suggested that because it isn’t what people want. They don’t care about a concept they were trying to create energy around an ideology that was considered, unless it is linked to other factors, like the power of the fashion house in in its time, underground. So I thought for today I would offer another per- the media, the industry, the market. YSL is a big brand but we still operate spective of a luxury brand to a broad demographic that doesn’t necessarily in quite a concentrated way. relate to fashion in the way that a more privileged layer of people do. I wanted to create a wider influence for the message that was being sent huo: When Marcel Duchamp created his great inventions he was very from the catwalk, by taking imagery of a collection and giving it to people much inspired by Poincaré and science. Being in the middle of things, on environmentally friendly paper in the street without targeting a specific exploring other spheres – going out of the art world into architecture, demographic. fashion, music, science – suddenly great inspirations can happen, no? This One of my visions for Saint Laurent is about giving back, so that even idea of going into other disciplines can be very productive. if you can’t afford it, you can still pick up the essence of the message, the elements of fashion that might be considered increasingly irrelevant but sp: Absolutely. It is, absolutely. remain for me its main aspects: the silhouette, the way the clothes are cut, the fabrics, a special pattern. It’s to say – ‘These are my thoughts and this huo: So I have collected manifestos and I write histories of manifestos is my message—you can pick up something from this and do it yourself.’ and am working on a book where we gather manifestos from the 20th and 21st centuries. One can obviously have all sorts of manifestos but they hans ulrich obrist is a Co-Director of The Serpentine Gallery, London. huo: It’s interesting to think about the different artistic manifestos from very often take the form of protest, of conversations, a form of discontent, stefano pilati is the Creative Director of Yves Saint Laurent. the past, and your manifesto now. Are there any fashion manifestos in iv v particular that inspired you? Do you have heroes from the past who were i yves saint laurent – manifesto viii – spring/summer 2011 yves saint laurent – manifesto viii – spring/summer 2011 interview – hans ulrich obrist / stefano pilati interview – hans ulrich obrist / stefano pilatirevelations or triggers for you? When we reinvent the future we somehow certain needs that sometimes go against your own needs and can affectrebuild the fragments of the past… and damage what you’re doing because of the time they consume. I’ve always tried to follow my instincts while still obeying the most sp: In that sense I don’t really have any particular heroes – there are so important rules, working out, for example, how to execute a contemporary many from the past that linger – but I always think about the masters and fashion show in a format that has stayed the same for more than 50, I can go from philosophers to artists, from writers to musicians. I fell in perhaps even 70 years now. In the first two or three years of my work for YSL, love with the idea of manifestos and with the term itself, because the word I tried to shift my approach to fashion, emphasizing femininity through the‘manifesto’ implied a sense of breaking through something while still be- silhouette. Then I added force to the cut, the form, the volume, to the ing connected to and aware of how things are today. performance of the clothes. Each look was a different silhouette, denounc- In terms of the format, I didn’t really relate to any historical manifestos ing the rules of the game that serve to contain and restrain your ideas and I’ve seen because my medium is fashion… There is fashion photography your skills… So I deliberately created something that seemed like a blank in the manifesto so even the idea of showing the pictures larger than they canvas but that actually presented many different fragmented forms, and appear in normal magazines was part of the act of manifesting. that was quite controversial. Last season I tried a more relaxed approach in an attempt to detachhuo: It has occurred to me that manifestos in the 20th century were very myself from a subjective point of view; to be a little easier to read inmasculine. The Romanian artist Arthur Segal said that he considered this terms of references from the past and the heritage that I have upon myquality of manifestos to indeed be a feature of the 20th century—noisy and shoulders. The truth is that no matter what we think, no matter what ourmuscular compared to what would follow. The 21st century manifesto would instincts really are, we are caught by rules that are not necessarily our own.have more accommodation, more dialogue, it would be more conversational Perhaps the only way to make a difference is to be very honest. Honesty is something I think we are generally afraid of. sp: Yes. I’ve been influenced by the 1920s and 1930s, when women began to come to the fore and be accepted as equal, especially in the arts and in huo: We held a manifesto-themed event at the Serpentine Gallery a philosophy. I’m very conscious of how macho our world is. Conceiving a col- couple of years ago for which we gathered people from the worlds of con- lection is an abstract process and this abstraction becomes concrete when I temporary art and music. An artist there said that manifestos in the 21st listen to and translate the total admiration I have for women. The term century are like Duchamp’s bicycle wheel: all of a sudden they have be-‘manifesto’ is very fruitful and also very male, so to see it take a feminine shape, come something we can revisit. Avant-garde manifestos were very often a to use it as a tool to communicate femininity, I believe that is very interesting. rupture with tradition and the past, and a looking ahead to the new. Now we observe a great deal of revisiting and reappropriation of the past. Pierrehuo: You have said that often fashion has to do with the invention of new Huyghe has called it the big ‘Re’: re-visiting, re-working… There are two-rules, and that sometimes means breaking other rules. The manifesto is dimensional ‘re’ and three-dimensional ‘re’. Perhaps we can extend this toalso about a moment of breaking or inventing new rules. fashion as well? I’m wondering how you worked with the archives in earlier collections and manifestos? How do you make the new out of the old?sp: As a fashion designer, you consider yourself more an opinion leaderthan an artist and, for good or bad, the rules of the game are not necessarily sp: I am someone who is definitely ruled by memories. I find that memorydictated by your own creativity, although obviously your creativity is central. imprisons you more than it sets you free. You can bang your head againstThe experience is also very emotional because it acts on this level of the wall and try to break them, but memories don’t disappear. What I tryseduction and admiration and abstraction, and the unknown that is the to do is to reinvent. I never go to the archives to redo something. The pastfeminine universe… Unfortunately the rules are dictated by a cause, by is part of me, and memories become part of my language and vocabulary,the market, because increasingly now you don’t create just for the sake of the light that I catch in my eyes, my perception of the environment increating; you’re committed and commissioned and you must also fulfill which I live. You have to accept certain overall limits and as someone with ii iii
  • 4. ESSAIS-002.tif ECRAN-018.JPG ECRAN-108.JPG ECRAN-052.JPG P1030902.JPG MAGAZINE-017.JPG MANIFESTO_TESTS149.jpg HUO PAGE 1033_GRIS.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS122.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS13.jpg FPE11_PM23.psd CLOSEUPFPE11_01.psd FOND-PAPIER2.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS17.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS113.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS116.jpg FOND-PAPIER3.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS117.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS118.jpg FOND-PAPIER5.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS18.jpg BRAVO_.tif YSL_SS11_014.jpg FOND-PAPIER6.jpgScreen shot 2011-01-20 at 12.21.00.png MANIFESTO_TESTS16.jpg DSC_6504.JPG ECRAN-017.tif CUT6.jpg YSL_SS11_006.jpg photo.JPG 03031.jpg YSL_SS11_007.jpg ECRAN-081.tif YSL_SS11_011.jpg FOND-PAPIER10.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS132.jpg 03035.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS123.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS133.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS134.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS136.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS151.jpg TRASFERTS_OR.pdf MANIFESTO_TESTS138.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS141.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS142.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS143.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS19_1.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS147.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS148.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS152.jpg MOCK-UP-YSL-0033.JPG MANIFESTO-SS11-MAQUETTE-016.JPG BLACK_TOTE.tif MANIFESTO_TESTS127.jpg COVER_2.tif IMG_0547.JPG RITZ-003B.psd into.JPG MANIFESTO_TESTS125.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS18_1.jpg P1030823.tif FPE_11_31 copie.tif MANIFESTO_TESTS126.jpg ECRAN-093.JPG MANIFESTO_TESTS19.jpg SCREENSHOTS2.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS110.jpg P1040241.JPG 03029_BW.jpg MANIFESTO_TESTS111.jpg MAGAZINE-015.tif FPE11_SC47.psd FPE11_SC53.psd MANIFESTO-SS11-MAQUETTE-006.tif MANIFESTO-SS11-MAQUETTE-012.JPG HUO PAGE 1033.jpg YSL-27-01-001.JPG MANIFESTO_TESTS118_1.jpg YSL-27-01-009.JPG ECRAN-056.JPG MANIFESTO_TESTS120.jpg CONTENT-017.JPG
  • 5. Page 1: Excerpt from ‘A Conversation Between Hans Ulrich Obrist and Stefano Pilati’. January 2011. Page 2-3: Spring/Summer 2011 women’s show. Hôtel Salomon de Rothschild, Paris. October 4, 2010. Pagee 4-5: Spring/Summer 2011 women’s show. Backstage. October 4, 2010. Page 6-7: Spring/Summer 2011 women’s show. Reviews. October 2010. Page 8-9: Spring/Summer 2011 advertising campaign. Villa Bled Roknine, Marrakech. October 20-24, 2010. Page 10-33: Spring/Summer 2011 advertising campaign. Portfolio. Scene 1: Blouse with bow detail and chiffon back in papaya cotton and silk toile flammée. Skirt in black cotton and wool twill. Earrings in old gold-tone metal with fingerprint motif. Belt in black padded leather with gold-tone metal buckle. 105 mm wedge sandal in black suede and gold lamé leather. Scene 2: Cape in black silk crepe. Halter top jumpsuit in black silk crepe. Belt in black suede with gold lamé leather piping. 105 mm multistrap wedge sandal in black suede and gold lamé leather. Scene 3: Bustier dress in black cotton and silk toile flammée with multicolor ruffles. Large belt in black suede with gold lamé leather piping. 105 mm wedge sandal in ocean blue multicolor python. Scene 4: Blouse in green silk chiffon with black fingerprint motif. Ruffled skirt in green silk chiffon with black fingerprint motif. Belt in blue suede with gold lame leather piping. 105 mm wedge sandal in ocean blue multicolor python. Scene 5: Tuxedo dress in black silk crepe. Chain in old-gold brass. Cuffs in gold-tone metal with fingerprint motif. 105 mm multistrap wedge sandal in black suede and gold lamé leather. Scene 6: Boatneck sweater in white cashmere and silk. Sunglasses in black acetate. Top with bow detail in beige cotton and silk toile flammée with black fingerprint motif. Sunglasses in white and black acetate. Scene 7: Jacket in black cotton saharienne gabardine. Skirt in black cotton saharienne gabardine with multicolor ruffles. Belt in black padded leather with gold-tone metal buckle. Reversible shopping bag in gold lamé and beige leather. 105 mm wedge sandal in black suede and gold lamé leather. Scene 8: Halter dress in khaki cotton, wool and silk piqué. Bracelet in old gold-tone brass. Scene 9: Totem dress in black cotton, wool and silk jacquard. Belt in black suede with gold lamé leather piping. Scene 10: Halter dress in papaya silk chiffon with black fingerprint motif. Bow blouse in papaya silk chiffon with black fingerprint motif. Large clutch in brown denim and black tweed-embossed leather. 105 mm wedge sandal in orange multicolor python. Scene 11: Double-breasted jacket in navy striped mohair wool. Pant in navy striped mohair wool. Socks in black ribbed wool. Shoe in black leather with espadrille sole. Scene 12: Halter top jumpsuit in black cotton and wool twill. Cuff in gold-tone metal with fingerprint motif. Belt in black suede with gold lamé leather piping. Page 34-35: Spring/Summer 2011 short film. Stills. Page 36-37: A Conversation Between Hans Ulrich Obrist and Stefano Pilati. January 2011. Page 38-39: Spring/Summer 2011 Manifesto. Design Process. Ysl Creative Director: Stefano Pilati Photographers : Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin Models : Arizona Muse, Will Westall Stylist : Joe McKenna Hair Stylist : Christiaan Houtenbos Make-Up Artist : Lisa Butler Manicurist : Khadija Choreographer : Stephen Galloway Stylist Assistant : Tony Irvine Ysl Image Director : Philippe Contini Ysl Image Coordinator: Céline Brighel Ysl Stylist: Carole Sévagamy Ysl Graphic Designer: Mathilde Dupont Tailor : Abdoulaye Dieng Studio Manager : Marc Kroop Photo Assistant : Kevin McCarthy Lighting Technician : Jodokus Driessen Digital Technician : Brian Anderson Chief Electrician : Bruno di Pietro Video Director of Photography: Léo Hinstin Video Digital Technician: Pierrick Corneau Production : JMG Production Production Team: Jamila el Glaoui, Abdouh el Glaoui, Arnault Kononow, Frédéric Tron, Dorothée Lindon Art Direction and Design: Ezra Petronio / Petronio Associates © 2011. Yves Saint Laurent, SAS au capital 123 810 775 €. 342 547 361 Paris RCS.Dépôt légal en cours. Imprimé en France par nos soins. Ne pas jeter sur la voie publique. Printed in France by Yves Saint Laurent. Please dispose of properly.
  • 6. spring/summer 2011 edition viii ysl.com