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Erasmus info pack_eng Erasmus info pack_eng Document Transcript

  • HACETTEPE UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF LETTERS DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISHLANGUAGE AND LITERATURE (BEYTEPE CAMPUS)EUROPEAN CREDIT TRANSFER SYSTEM
  • INFORMATION PACKAGEFOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2012-13 CONTENTS1. GENERAL INFORMATION1.1. Department1.2. Socrates-Erasmus Team1.3. Staff Members and Their Research Fields2. STUDY AND RESEARCH AT THE DEPARTMENT2.1. Educational and Professional Goals2.2. Student Numbers2.3. Major Fields of Study and Research2.4. Educational Facilities2.5. Degree Programmes3. ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS3.1. Entrance Requirements for Undergraduate Studies3.2. Entrance Requirements for Masters Studies3.3. Entrance Requirements for Doctoral Studies4. STUDENT ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING SYSTEM4.1. Student Assessment Methods4.2. Grading System5. STRUCTURE OF THE DEGREE PROGRAMMES IN EFFECT5.1. The Structure of the Undergraduate Programme5.2. The Structure of the Graduate Studies5.3. Credit Requirements and Time Limits for the Degree Programmes6. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES AND DESCRIPTIONS6.1. Courses and Credits7. GRADUATE PROGRAMMES AND DESCRIPTIONS7.1. English Language and Literature7.1.1. Masters in English Language and Literature7.1.2. PhD in English Language and Literature7.2. British Cultural Studies7.2.1. Masters in British Cultural Studies7.2.2. PhD in British Cultural Studies
  • 1. GENERAL INFORMATION1.1. The DepartmentHead of Department: Prof.Dr. Burçin ErolCorrespondence Address: Department of English Language and Literature,Faculty of Letters, Hacettepe University, Beytepe Campus, 06532 Beytepe, Ankara,Turkey.Phone: (+ 90) (312) 297 84 75URL: http://www.ide.hacettepe.edu.tr1.2. Socrates-Erasmus TeamSocrates-Erasmus Programme Department Coordinator: Asst. Prof. Dr. Alev KaradumanTelephone : (+90) (312) 297 84 75 E-mail : karaduman@hacettepe.edu.trDepartment ECTS Coordinator: Asst. Prof. Dr. Alev Karaduman Telephone : (+90) (312)297 84 75 E-mail : karaduman@hacettepe.edu.trAssistant Coordinator: Res.Asst. Hande Dirim Telephone : (+90) (312) 297 84 75 E-mail: handedrm@gmail.com1.3. Staff Members and Their Research FieldsProfessors: 3A.Deniz Bozer, PhD (Hacettepe) - British Drama, American Drama, Short Story, LiteraryTranslation, British Cultural Studies, and Comparative DramaBurçin Erol, PhD (Hacettepe) - Medieval English Literature, British Cultural Studies,Literary Translation, and Comparative LiteratureSerpil Oppermann, PhD (Hacettepe) - British and American Novel, Literary Theory andCriticism, Romantic Poetry, Comparative Novel, and British Cultural StudiesAssociated Professors: 3Huriye Reis, PhD (Liverpool) - Medieval English Literature, Seventeenth CenturyEnglish Literature, British Poetry, Literary Theory and Criticism, and British CulturalStudiesHande Seber, PhD (Hacettepe) - Renaissance English Literature, British Poetry, BritishCultural StudiesAytül Özüm, PhD (Hacettepe) - British Novel, Literary Theory and Criticism, BritishCultural Studies View slide
  • Assistant Professors: 2Şebnem Kaya, PhD (Hacettepe) - British Drama, American Drama, Short Story, andBritish Cultural StudiesAlev Karaduman, PhD (Hacettepe) - British Novel, British Cultural Studies , LiteraryTranslationLecturers: 1Sinan Akıllı, PhD (Hacettepe) - British Novel, British Cultural Studies , Literary TranslationResearch Assistants: 4Pınar Taşdelen, MA (Hacettepe) - Medieval English Literature, Gender Studies, BritishPoetry,İmren Yelmiş, PhD (Hacettepe) – British Cultural StudiesMerve Sarı (Hacettepe) – British Poetry, Science FictionEmine Seda Çağlayan, PhD (Hacettepe) – in ProgressAuxiliary Staff: 2Ms. Meral Elcan, Department SecretaryMr. Ali Rıza Erkan, Auxiliary Service2. STUDY AND RESEARCH AT THE DEPARTMENT2.1. Educational and Professional GoalsThe Department, founded in 1965, is one of the earliest departments of the University and apioneering institution in the study of English language and literature in Turkey. The aim ofthe Department is to study and conduct research on English language, literature and culture inan interdisciplinary manner and to help its students acquire the qualities of a scientificresearcher. During the education students are presented theoretical and practical knowledgethrough the use of the rich audio-visual sources of the Department. Conferences by well-known researchers and talks and presentations by contemporary English/Turkish writers andpoets as well as Department staff enrich Department’s education. Those graduates whoreceive teaching certificates may become English teachers or lecturers in many state andprivate schools and universities. Graduates are also able to find jobs which require culturaland literary knowledge, such as those in tourism, ministries, banks, state and private mediainstitutions, or even become translators, writers or editors. The medium of instruction of allprogrammes offered by the Department is English.2.2. Student Numbers: View slide
  • Undergraduate Students 452 MA Students 25 PhD Students 92.3. Major Fields of Study and Research a) English Language and Literature b) British Cultural Studies2.4. Educational FacilitiesThe Department has a seminar library which includes main reference books and somemajor secondary sources on British Culture and Literature. The Department also hassome audiovisual material related to the field.2.5. Degree ProgrammesThe names and average lengths of the degree programmes offered by the Department are asfollows:Undergraduate ProgrammeThis is a minimum 4-year programme which comprises different compulsory courses onBritish literature and culture.Graduate Programmes Length of Study a) MA Programme in English Language and Literature minimum 4 semesters b) PhD Programme in English Language and Literature minimum 8 semesters c) MA Programme in British Cultural Studies minimum 4 semesters d) PhD Programme in British Cultural Studies minimum 8 semesters3. ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS3.1. Entrance Requirements for Undergraduate StudiesThe Department accepts each year a maximum of 80 students for undergraduate studies,depending on its resources for teaching. Individuals wishing to study English language andliteratrure as undergraduates in the Department are required to have completed their lyceeeducation or its equivalent successfully and to have obtained enough points from theuniversity entrance exam. This exam is organized centrally and annually by the StudentSelection and Placement Centre (ÖSYM) and the students are placed by the same centre intodepartments according to rank order of the points they have obtained. The undergraduatestudents are not required to take any other exam before registering for study in theDepartment.3.2. Entrance Requirements for Masters StudiesEntrance to graduate master studies in the Department is conditional upon the satisfaction of
  • several criteria. The Department organizes both written and oral exam for the applicants totest the level of their academic performance in English language, literature and culture andtheir general awareness of current issues. However, only those holding a bachelors degree canapply for postgraduate masters studies in the Department. These individuals are required tohave obtained a minimum of 45 points from the Graduate Study Exam (LES), and theminimum grades specified by the Institute of Social Sciences from the foreign languageproficiency exam(s). Individuals who fail to provide documentary proof of the level of theirproficiency in the English language can take the foreign language exam organized by theUniversity or they may be granted one year of leave to improve their knowledge of a foreignlanguage in programmes organized again by the University, provided that they have passedthe Departmental written/oral entrance exam.3.3. Entrance Requirements for Doctoral StudiesThe criteria set for acceptance for masters studies apply with some modification foracceptance to doctoral studies in the Department. Only individuals holding a masters degreecan apply for doctoral studies in the Department. These individuals are again required to haveobtained a minimum of 45 points from Graduate Study Exam (LES), and passing grades fromthe foreign language proficiency exam(s) in a second foreign language (German, French, orItalian).4. STUDENT ASSESSMENT METHODS AND GRADING SYSTEM4.1. Student Assessment MethodsUndergraduate students’ performance is graded on the basis of at least two midterms and afinal examination. The midterms and additional in-term assignments (research papers, oralpresentations and quizzes) have a 50% weight in the evaluation, while the final examinationhas the other 50% weight. In compliance with the University’s statutes, graduate students(both MA and PhD), while taking pre-thesis required courses, have to sit for 2 mid-terms anda final examination for each course they take. Additionally, each student is required to presentminimum 2 research papers and other work required by the course instructor. Moreover, PhDstudents have, before a committee of 5 full professors, to take a comprehensive qualificationexamination (both written and oral) upon their completion of the required total credits beforethey proceed to the writing of the thesis, which may take more than 4 semesters.4.2. Grading SystemThe grading system as defined by the University regulations rests on points and theirequivalents in grades and academic scores. Though the same system applies for bothundergraduate and graduate studies, the passing grade is set differently, as shown in thefollowing charts. In addition, the grading system does not attach qualitative labels(outstanding, excellent, very good, etc.) to the passing grades and their equivalents in scores.Grading System for Undergraduate StudiesPoints Grade Score Result90-100 A1 4.0 Successful 85-89 A2 3.5 Successful 75-84 B1 3.0 Successful 70-74 B2 2.5 Successful 65-69 C1 2.0 Successful 60-64 C2* 1.5 55-59 D1* 1.0 50-54 D2* 0.5 0-49 F3 0.0 Failed in the final examination F2 0.0 Failed to attend the final examination
  • without any legitimate reason to do so F1 0.0 Failed because of absenteeism, does not have the right to enter the final exam G Successful in a non-credit course K Failed in a non-credit courses H Has legitimate excuse for not attending the final examination M Exempt from the course concerned∗ C2, D1 or D2 grades taken from a course are considered successful on the condition that thestudent general academic degree is 1.8. Students who have the general academic degr lessthan 1.8 for two times repeatedly must review the whole year. However, the students thuspassed a course are permitted to repeat the same course in order to increase their grades, inwhich case it is the last grade that counts.Grading System for Graduate StudiesPoints Grade Score Result90-100 A1 4.0 Successful, (both masters and Ph.D students)85-89 A2 3.5 Successful, (both masters and Ph. D students)75-84 B1 3.0 Successful, (both masters and Ph. D students)70-74 B2 2.5 Successful, (only masters students)65-69 C1 2.0 Successful, (only masters students)60-64 C2 1.5 Failed (both levels)55-59 D1 1.0 Failed (both levels) 50-54 D2 0.5 Failed (both levels) 0-49 F3 0.0 Failed in the final examination F2 0.0 Failed to attend the final examination without any legitimate reason to do so F1 0.0 Failed because of absenteeism, does not have the right to enter the final exam G Successful in a non-credit course K Failed in a non-credit courses H Has legitimate excuse for not attending the final examination M Exempt from the course concerned5. STRUCTURE OF THE DEGREE PROGRAMMES IN EFFECT5.1. The Structure of the Undergraduate ProgrammeThe curriculum for undergraduate studies defines a single programme based on course work.These courses are of four types: university common compulsory courses, departmentalcompulsory courses, intra-departmental elective courses and extradepartmental electivecourses.a) University common compulsory courses comprise those with course codes AİT(Atatürk’s Principles and Revolutions), TKD (Turkish Language), and Foreign Language.The first two sets of these courses have to be taken by all students registered with the
  • university and the credits gained are not included in the minimum total credits required forgraduation. The foreign language courses (English, French or German) have to be taken by allstudents at the preparatory year and the credits gained are included in the minimum totalcredits required for graduation. However, the students can take exemption exams for eachcourse and the successful students are granted the full grades they obtained. Erasmusexchange students are exempt from these foreign language courses.b) Departmental compulsory courses comprise those courses which are offered by theDepartment and which all the undergraduate students must take in order to graduate. Thereare some compulsory courses in the present curriculum which yield a total of 88 credits.c) Departmental elective courses comprise those courses which are in the Department’scourses catalogue but may not be offered every academic year.d) Extra-departmental elective courses comprise a fixed list of courses which are in factoffered by other departments to their own students but which English language and literatureundergraduates are permitted through an interdepartmental agreement to take as electives. It isentirely left to the students to take any of the courses thus determined. The Departmentactively encourages the students to adopt an interdisciplinary approach in their studies with aview for their future professional career and academic interests.5.2. The Structure of the Graduate ProgrammesThe degree programmes for graduate studies combine course work with the writing of athesis. However, there are some differences between the structure and the requirements of themasters and doctoral programmes.a) Masters studies: For an MA student, to receive the degree of MA in English Language andLiterature or British Cultural Studies, s/he must take minimum seven courses (equivalent ofminimum 21 credits, ) in the relevant programme over a period of 2 semesters (usually 4courses in Autumn and 3 in Spring) plus a non-credit seminar course on a special subjectrelated to the student’s prospective thesis. Upon the completion of the 21-credit preliminarycourses, the student is required to submit, under his/her supervisor’s advice, a thesis proposalwhich is reviewed and evaluated by the Department Academic Council and, if approved, sentto the Institute. The thesis must be completed over a period of 2 semesters (if needed thisperiod can be extended up to 2 semesters), and, upon the completion of the thesis and incompliance with the regulations, the student submits the thesis for a viva. The thesis is thenevaluated by a committee of 5 examiners (at least one of them is an external examiner),proposed by the Academic Council of the Department and appointed by the AcademicAdministrative Council of the Institute. If the examiners approve of the thesis and accept it,the student is admitted to a viva and, upon his/her successful performance, is recommendedby the examiners to the Institute for the conferment of the degree of MA.b) Doctoral studies: For a PhD student, to receive the degree of PhD in English Languageand Literature or in British Cultural Studies, s/he must preliminarily take minimum sevencourses (equivalent of minimum 21 credits) over a period of three semesters in the relevantprogramme and fulfil all the academic requirements. Upon the successful completion of thesecourses, the student is then required to take a comprehensive written and oral examinationconducted by a committee of 5 examiners, at least one of whom is external. If the studentpasses this examination, s/he is then required to submit a thesis proposal prepared under theguidance of his/her supervisor, which s/he must defend before a committee of 3 members
  • including the supervisor and acting as the Thesis Supervision Committee. Upon theacceptance by the committee of the proposal, the student proceeds with the thesis research andwriting, which takes minimum 4 semesters (extendable for 4 semesters). Upon thecompletions of the thesis, a committee of 5 examiners, at least one of whom is external, isappointed by the Institute’s Academic Administrative Council upon the recommendations ofthe Department’s Academic Council. Each examiner independently reads and evaluates thethesis and prepares a detailed report for joint evaluation prior to the viva. At the jointevaluation session the examiners discuss the individual reports and reach a joint resolutionwhich may be “Accepted” or “to be revised” or “rejected”. If the examiners accept the thesisand approve of its academic quality, they then admit the student to a viva which usually lastsover an hour and comprises a wide range of questions related to the thesis and its relevantsubjects. If the examiners find the student successful in the viva they recommend him/her tothe Institute for the conferment of the degree of PhD.5.3. Credit Requirements and Time Limits for the Degree ProgrammesMinimum Time limits (in semesters)Programme Credits minimum maximum-Undergraduate studies 128 8 14-Masters studies 21 4 6-Doctoral studies 21 8 126. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES AND DESCRIPTIONS6.1. Compulsory and Elective Courses and Descriptions COMPULSORY COURSESFIRST YEAR ECTSIED 134 Study Skills and Research Techniques 6IED 141 Mythology 6IED 142 Classical Literature 6IED 143 Introduction to Literature 6IED 151 Introduction to Britain I 6IED 152 Introduction to Britain II 6SECOND YEAR ECTSIED 233 Speech and Communication Skills 6IED 257 Life and Society in Britain 6IED 258 British Popular Culture 6IED 261 Introduction to Culture Studies 6IED 272 British Poetry and Prose I 6IED 281 Short Story 6IED 282 British Novel I 6
  • THIRD YEAR ECTSIED 337 Translation III 6IED 365 British Drama I 6IED 366 Shakespeare 6IED 368 British Drama II 6IED 373 British Poetry and Prose II 6IED 376 British Poetry and Prose III 6IED 387 British Novel II 6IED 388 British Novel III 6FOURTH YEAR ECTSIED 441 Literary Theory and Criticism I 6IED 444 Literary Theory and Criticism II 6IED 463 British Drama III 6IED 466 British Drama IV 6IED 475 British Poetry and Prose IV 6IED 478 British Poetry and Prose V 6IED 485 British Novel IV 6
  • ELECTIVE COURSES ECTSIED 131 Writing Skills 6IED 132 Spoken English 6IED 135 Advanced English Grammar 6IED 138 Reading Skills II 6IED 146 Native Sources of British Literature 6IED 147 Reading Skills I 6IED 231 Translation I 6IED 248 Translation II 6IED 280 Readings in Children’s Literature 6IED 293 Survey of American History and Culture 6IED 296 American Drama 6IED 348 Translation IV 6IED 357 Gender Studies in Literature 6IED 380 Readings in Western Philosophy 6IED 381 Types of Non-Fictional Narrative 6IED 383 Contemporary English Lyrics (Song Lyrics) 6IED 384 Literature and Science Fiction 6IED 391 Letters and Diaries 6IED 393 Literature in Film Studies 6IED 398 American Poetry 6IED 447 Comparative Literature 6IED 490 Postmodern Novel 6IED 492 Evaluations of Drama 6IED 493 Comparative Drama 6IED 497 Translation (Texts of Law, Politics and Economics) 6IED 498 American Novel 6
  • DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE UNDERGRADUATE COURSESCourse Code and Title IED 131 Writing SkillsType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CompulsoryNumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Ozlem AydınPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One semester (3 theoretical, three hours per week)Course Contents ● The differences between written and oral composition ● Grammar, vocabulary, punctuation ● The essentials f paragraph writing: topic sentence, controlling idea, supporting ideas, unity and coherence ● Outline and its importance ● Formulating the introductory, transitional, supporting and concluding paragraphs of an essay ● The essentials of introduction, development and conclusion of an essay ● Thesis statement and its emphasis in the paragraphs of an essay ● Essay writing techniques such as description, comparison, contrast and exemplificationObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to differentiate between written and oral composition, recognise(Learning Outcomes) the importance of grammar, vocabulary and punctuation, identify and formulate the basic essentials of paragraph writing such as the topic sentence, controlling idea, supporting ideas, unity and coherence, identify the introductory, transitional, supporting and concluding paragraphs of an essay, arrange thesis statement and its emphasis in the paragraphs of an essay, distinguish and employ the essay writing techniques such as
  • description, comparison, contrast and exemplification, develop their writing skills in English.RecommendedReading(s) Lane, Janet and Ellen Lange. Writing Clearly: An Editing Guide. Washington:Heinle and Heinle Publishers, 1999. Ruetten, Mary and Regina L.Smalley. Refining Composition Skills:Rhetoric and Grammar for ESL Students. Washington: Heinle and Heinle Publishers, 2000. Brown, Kristine and Susan Hood. Writing matters: Writing Skills and Strategies for Students of English. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1989.Teaching Method(s) Lecturing, writing workshops, group workshops, the resulting essays are to be corrected through further discussion in class both with the aim of self- correction and criticism.Assessment Method(s) Workshops (15%), two midterms (35%) and a final (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 132 Spoken EnglishType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ElectiveNumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Ozlem AydınPre-requisite(s) noneSemester/Trimester One semester (3 theoretical, three hours per week)Course Contents ● The differences between written and oral composition, transformation of written text into an oral practice ● Grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, phonation, stress, diction, articulation, intonation ● The importance of Body language ● The essentials of public speech, the relationship between the speaker and the audience ● Stage fright and how to overcome stage fright ● Impromptu speech ● Narrative speech ● Descriptive speech ● How-to speechObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to differentiate between written and oral composition, recognise the(Learning Outcomes) importance of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, phonation, stress, diction, articulation and intonation and apply to their speeches, recognise the importance of body language in oral communication, identify and formulate the essentials of public speech, recognise the relationship between the speaker and the audience, identify stage fright, formulate how to overcome stage fright and assess how to design and deliver a fluent speech with grammatical correctness and a reasonable speed.Recommended Fletcher, Leon. How to Design and Deliver a Speech. New York:Reading(s) HarperCollins, 1995. Lucas, Stephen E. The Art of Public Speaking. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2004.
  • Osborn, Michael. Public Speaking. Boston: Houghton Miffin, 2005.Teaching Method(s) Lecturing, class discussions, group workshops, oral practices and presentationsAssessment Method(s) Group workshops (10 %), two midterms (40 %) and a final (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 134 Research TehniquesType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Res. Asst. Dilek BulutPre-requisite(s) NonSemester/Trimester 1 Semestre (3 theoratical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents • The development of the ability of making research and the use of library. • Preparation of working bibliography. • The arrangement of note taking, and the construction of note card. • The choice of subject. • The preparation of outline. • Writing the research project from the formal outline.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to acquire the methods and the techniques necessary for studying, using(Learning Outcomes) library and avoiding plagiarism and preparing a research project and writing formal papers.Recommended Pirie, David B. (1985). How to Write Critical Essays. London:Reading(s) Routlege.Teaching Method(s) Lecturing, Group workshops, individual research.Assessment Method(s) 2 Midterms %40, , Group presentations %10, Final exam %50.Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 135 Advanced English GrammarType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Research Assistant Fatma KalpaklıPre-requisite(s)Semester/Trimester 1 semester (3 hours per week)Course Contents English GrammarObjective of the Course At the end of the semester, the students will have an enhanced(Learning Outcomes) knowledge of English grammer and will be able to recognize grammer mistakes quickly and will have sufficient knowledge of English so that they will be able to share it with their classmates.RecommendedReading(s) Simon & Schuster. (2002). Kaplan GRE Exam, New York: 2002 Öztürk, Cesur. (2002). Building Skills for Proficiency. Ankara: Hacettepe-Taş. Bailey, Richard. The Best Test Preparation for the TOEFL : Test of English as a Foreign Language. (2000) Piscataway, N.J: Research & Education Association.
  • Teaching Method(s) Lectures, TOEFL,GRE and KPDS exercises and group worksAssessment Method(s) 2 Midterms (% 50) and 1 Final (% 50).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 138 Reading Skills IIType of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents • Vocabulary • Word formation • Multiple choice exercises • Summary writing • Comprehension exercises • In-other-words drills • DiscussionObjective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • enhance their vocabulary;(Learning Outcomes) • form words; • use words within the right context; • summarise the text they read; • better understand the text; • vxplain the text in different words; • discuss the text.Recommended Texts taken from publications like The Economist, Time, TLS,Reading(s) Foreign Policy, National GeographicTeaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions and exercisesAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms (50 %), final examination (50 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 141 MythologyType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(3 hours theoretical,3 creditd)Course Contents Prehellenik mythology Classic mythology • Creation, cosmology, other world • Gods(sky,earth,water underworld) • HeroesObjective of the Course At he end of the semester the student will be able to identify the gods,their functions and stories ,summarise them in their own(Learning Outcomes) words, identify the use and allusions in art and literature, analyse their meanings and compare and contrast various aplications in art and life.Recommended Hamilton, Edith.(1969) Mythology. Ontario:MentorReading(s) Estin,Colette & Helene Laporte.(2002) Yunan ve Roma Mitolojisi. Ankara: TUBİTAKTeaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with slides and films, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 40 %, project and /or research 10% ,final 50 %Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 142 Classical LiteratureType of Course Compulsory(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • Early settlements and civilizations in ancient Greece; • Oral literary tradition; • The epic tradition and the Homeric epics; • The development of tragedy and the classical Greek tragedy; • Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and samples of their tragedies; • The development of comedy, and the classical Greek comedy; • Aristophanes, and samples of his comedies; • Roman literature and its distinctive characteristics; • Plautus and Terence, and samples of their plays; • Virgil, and samples of his writings; • Horace, and samples of his writings; • Seneca’s idea of tragedy, and samples of his tragedies.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, the students will be fully familiar, in a historical and literary context, with the main aspects of(Learning Outcomes) classical Greek and Roman literature; they will be able to interpret, appreciate and discuss sample texts and, thus, develop their critical skills; they will also be aware of the place of classical literature in the European literary tradition and, especially, of its importance for the study of English literature so that they can use their knowledge of it in relation to this literature.
  • Recommended Murray, Gilbert. The Rise of the Greek Epic. London: OxfordReading(s) UP, 1967. Vivante, Paola. The Homeric Imagination: A Study of Homer’s Poetic Perception of Reality. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1970. Baldock, Marion. Greek Tragedy: An Introduction. Bristol: Bristol Classical publications, 1989. Russo, Carlo F. Aristophanes: An Author for the Stage. London: Routledge, 1994. Pickard-Cambridge, Sir Arthur Wallace. Dithyramb, Tragedy and Comedy. Oxford: Clarendon, 1970. Hornsby, Roger A. Patterns of Action in The Aeneid: An Interpretation of Vergil’s Epic Similes. Iowa City: U of Iowa P, 1970. Goldberg, Sander M. Epic in Republican Rome. New York: Oxford UP, 1995.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations.Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%25 and %25), final examination (%40), research and presentation (%10)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 143 Introduction to LiteratureType of Course Compulsory(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Dr.Alev BAYSALPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents . The meaning of literature . Classification of literature by period, genre and movement . Types of literary writing . Poetry: Kinds and forms of poetry, major elements of poetry . Drama: Kinds and forms of drama, major elements of drama . Novel: Kinds and forms of novel, major elements of novel . Non-fiction: Kinds and forms of non-fiction, major elements of non-fictionObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be familiar with the main aspects of literature and literary terms. They will(Learning Outcomes) recognize and recall the major literary terms and use them appropriately in different contexts. The students are also expected to apply these terms whenever they are asked to.Recommended ABRAMS,M.H.A Glossary of literary terms.Reading(s) Harcourt Brace College Publish Fort Worth CUDDON, J.A. Dictionary of Literary Terms. New York:Penguin Boks Ltd. 1985 1999 TURCO,Lewis.The Book of Lliterary Terms : the genres of fiction, drama, nonfiction, University Press of New England Hanover, 1999Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations.
  • Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%25 and %25), final examination (%40), research and presentation (%10)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 146 Sources of British LiteratureType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 3 0 3ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (3 theoric, 3 hours a week)Course Contents • Celtic culture and mythology, • Scandinavian culture and mythology, • Basic knowledge about the Bible and Christianity.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise Celtic culture and mythology, Scandinavian culture(Learning Outcomes) and mythology, and the basic knowledge about the Bible and Christianity that are essential for the understanding and interpretation of English literary texts. They will also be able to illustrate this knowledge through the analysis of the literary texts that they will encounter in the following semesters.RecommendedReading(s) Cotterell, A. and R. Storm (2002). The Ultimate Encylopedia of Mythology. New York: Hermes. Davidson, E. (1988). Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe. Manchester, Manchester UP. Grimal, Pierre. Ed. (1989). Larousse World Mythology. London: Hamlyn.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, visual material, discussion, presentation
  • Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term exams (40%), term paper (10%), ve final exam(50) %.Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 147 Reading Skills IType of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents • Vocabulary • Word formation • Multiple choice exercises • Summary writing • Comprehension exercises • In-other-words drills • DiscussionObjective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • enhance their vocabulary;(Learning Outcomes) • form words; • use words within the right context; • summarise the text they read; • better understand the text; • explain the in different words; • discuss the text.Recommended Text taken from a variety of different sources likeReading(s) Collie, Joanne, and Stephen Slater. Short Stories for Creative Language Classrooms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1993. Fellag, Linda Robinson. Life, Language, and Literature. Boston, Massachusetts: Heinle, 1993. Grellet, Françoise. Developing Reading Skills: A Practical Guide to Reading Comprehension Exercises. Cambridge: Cambridge
  • UP, 1987.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions and exercisesAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms (50 %), final examination (50 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 151 Introduction to Britain IType of Course C(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents • Britain’s geography:Global position and regions,resources • Early Britain: The Celts, the Romans, the Saxons, the Vikings, major literary works • England in the Middle Ages: The Norman conquest, feudalism (political development, the church, the government, major literary figures and modes) • England in the Renaissance: Renaissance, humanism, Reformation in Europe and Britain, Tudor period (political developments, the church, the government, major literary figures and modes)Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • define the geographic features of Britain;(Learning Outcomes) • state in his/her own words the historical, social and political developments seen in England from the beginning to the seventeenth century; • summarize the writers and types of writing dating from this period; • analyse the literary works dating from this period; • establish links between the historical, social and political developments seen in England in the mentioned period and the works of literature again written in this period; • comment on the historical, social, political and literary developments seen in England in the mentioned period.Recommended McDowall, David. An Illustrated History of Britain. Longman,
  • Reading(s) 1993. Schultz, Harold John. British History. New York: Harper Perennial, 1992. Abrams, M.H. et al., eds. The Norton Anthology of English Literature.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentations and in-class discussionsAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms (40 %), student presentation (10 %), final examination (50 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 152 Introduction to Britain IIType of Course C(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents • England in the 17th century: Stuart Period (political developments, the government, society, religion and thought, major literary figures and modes) • England in the 18th century (political developments, the government, society, religion and thought, major literary figures and modes) • England in the 19th century (to World War I) (political developments, the government, society, religion and thought, major literary figures and modes)Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • define the geographic features of Britain;(Learning Outcomes) • state in his/her own words the historical, social and political developments seen in England in the period between the seventeenth century and World War I; • summarize the writers and types of writing dating from this period; • analyse the literary works dating from this period; • establish links between the historical, social and political developments seen in England in the mentioned period and the works of literature again written in this period; • comment on the historical, social, political and literary developments seen in England in the mentioned period.Recommended McDowall, David. An Illustrated History of Britain. Longman,Reading(s) 1993. Schultz, Harold John. British History. New York: Harper
  • Perennial, 1992. Abrams, M.H. et al., eds. The Norton Anthology of English Literature.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentations and in-class discussionsAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms (40 %), student presentation (10 %), final examination (50 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Code and name of course TKD 103 Turkish Language IType of Course RequisiteCredite of Course 202ECTS Credite of Course 4Course Lecture Determined by DepartmentPre-requiste NoneCourse Lenght 1 semester (4 theoretical, 4 hours week).Course Content • Definition of language, language and culture • Languages in the world and Turkic languages • Historical development of Modern Turkish • Spelling • Phonetic • Morphology • SyntaxCourse Objectives The end of the course, student,(Learning outcomes) will know the relation of language and culture, languages of the world and Turkic languages; the student will can apply the rules of the spelling; the student will can explain the phonetics, morphology and syntax of Turkish.Bibliography Atabey, İbrahim vd., Türk Dili ve Kompozisyon Bilgileri, yargı yay., 2005. Demir, N., Emine Yılmaz, Türk Dili El Kitabı, Grafiker, Ankara 2003 Eker, Süer, Çağdaş Türk Dili, Grafiker yay., Ankara 2006.Main Teaching Methods: Theoretical lecturesAssessment Methods Consistancy of class attendance (%5), 1 theoretical midterm (%15), projects (%30), and 1 theoretical final examination (%50).Language of Course Turkish
  • Code and name of course TKD 104 Turkish Language IIType of Course RequisiteCredite of Course 202ECTS Credite of Course 4Course Lecture Determined by DepartmentPre-requiste NoneCourse Lenght 1 semester (4 theoretical, 4 hours week).Course Content • Common mistakes in usage of language • Written expression • Genres of written expression • Oral expression • Genres of oral expression • Preparation of scientific writingsCourse Objectives The end of the course, student,(Learning outcomes) will know common mistakes in usage of language; the student will improve capacity of written and oral expression. yazılı ve sözlü anlatım becerisini geliştirecektir.Bibliography Atabey, İbrahim vd., Türk Dili ve Kompozisyon Bilgileri, yargı yay., 2005. Demir, N., Emine Yılmaz, Türk Dili El Kitabı, Grafiker, Ankara 2003 Zülfikar, H., Yüksek Öğretimde Türkçe Yazım ve Anlatım, Ankara 1977.Main Teaching Methods: Theoretical lecturesAssessment Methods Consistancy of class attendance (%5), 1 theoretical midterm (%15), projects (%30), and 1 theoretical final examination (%50).Language of Course Turkish
  • Course Code and Title IED 231 Translation IType of Course Elective(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Dr.Alev BAYSALPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents .Translation and cultural interaction, basic theoretical introduction, .The origins and historical development of translation .Translation of the tenses: .Translation of sample sentences in various tenses, with particular emphasis on problematic tenses .Translation of idiomatic expressions: .Translation of sample sentences which contain various idiomatic expressions .Translation of anecdotesObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to define the meaning and function of language in translation. They will(Learning Outcomes) recognize the differences of the two languages, the main and the targeted ones. They will develop their language competence through the practice of different translation activities and manage to translate the given text correctly.RecommendedReading(s) ERER,Nadide Güher Translation as an integrated approach in elt. The Department of Teaching Eng Ankara 2006 FRANCE, Peter, The Oxford guide to literature in English translation Oxford University Press
  • Oxford ;New Yor 2000 Kocaman,Ahmet. İngilizce çeviri kılavuzu = a guidebook for English translation Arkadaş Kitabevi Yayınları Ankara 1988Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations.Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%25 and %25), final examination (%40), research and presentation (%10)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 233 Speech and Communication SkillsType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CompulsoryNumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Ozlem AydınPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One semester (3 theoretical, three hours per week)Course Contents ● The differences between written and oral composition, transformation of written text into an oral practice ● Grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, phonation, stress, diction, articulation, intonation ● The importance of Body language ● The essentials of public speech, the relationship between the speaker and the audience ● Stage fright and how to overcome stage fright ● Types of speech: persuasive, informative ● The essentials of choosing and formulating a topic ● Strategies for preparing a good and effective presentation ● The importance of intellectual background while preparing a presentation; consulting to a library, using internet, making use of computer programmes and CD, VCD and DVDs, observation, planningObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to differentiate between written and oral composition, recognise the(Learning Outcomes) importance of grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, phonation, stress, diction, articulation and intonation and apply to their speeches, recognise the importance of body language in oral communication, identify and formulate the essentials of public speech, recognise the relationship between the speaker and the audience, identify stage fright, formulate how to overcome stage fright, recognise and categorise the types of speech, recognise the essentials while choosing and formulating a topic, appraise strategies for preparing a good and effective presentation, organise the use of audio-visual aids while preparing a
  • presentation, develop communication skills, assess how to design and deliver fluent persuasive and informative speeches with grammatical correctness and a reasonable speed.RecommendedReading(s) Jaffe, Clella. Public Speaking: A Cultural Perspective. New York: St. John’s University, 2000. Osborn, Michael. Public Speaking. Boston: Houghton Miffin, 2005.Teaching Method(s) Lecturing, class discussions, group workshops, oral practices and presentationsAssessment Method(s) Speeches (oral presentations) (60 %), final exam (40 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 248 Translation IIType of Course Elective(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Dr.Alev BAYSALPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents .The importance of the use of language in translation .Interaction of languages and cultures in translation .The importance of the translator .Translation of sample short passages (excluding purely professional material), mostly from newspapers, magazines, journals, and other popular publications: Popular news, society columns, music columns, recipes, sports news weather reports, advertisements, horoscopes, popular interviews, consumer columns, letters to the editor, letters to “Agony Aunt,” popular romances and similar other materialObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to define the meaning and function of language and culture in translation.(Learning Outcomes) They will recognize the differences of the two languages, the main and the targeted ones. They will develop their language competence through the practice of different translation activities and manage to translate the given text correctly.Recommended Hasdemir, Yılmaz.Reading(s) Translation methods = çeviri metotları. Alfa Bursa 2002 Katzner, Kenneth. The Languages of the world Routledge London 2003 Schaffner, Christina. Translation in the global village Multilingual Matters
  • Clevedon, U.K. 2000Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations.Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%25 and %25), final examination (%40), research and presentation (%10)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 257 LIFE AND SOCİETY IN BRITAINType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(3 hours theoretical,3 credits)Course Contents • Geography, economy, and political alliences of Britain • Educational,judiciary,administrative,religious and familysocial security institutions • Daily life, customs,habits,fashion,leisure • Royalyt,class,gender, ethnicityObjective of the Course At he end of the semester the student will be able to give brief information on GB, its institutions,way of life, traditions,identify(Learning Outcomes) British stereotypes, compare this knowledge with Turkish institutions and traditions,predict the future of the institutions.Recommended Oakland,John.(2002)British Civilization. London:RoutledgeReading(s) Kocabaşoğlu,Uğur.(1995) İngiliz Sicimi. Ankara:İmgeTeaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with slides and films, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 40 %, project and /or research 10% ,final 50 %Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 258 British Popular CultureType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Res. Asst. Dilek BulutPre-requisite(s) NoSemester/Trimester 1 Semestre (3 theoratical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents • The definition of the concepts of culture, high and low culture and popular culture. • The explanation of the terminology related with popular culture. • The explanation of the historical development of popular culture. • The examination of the relation between popular culture and music. • The examination of the relation between popular culture and sports. • The examination of the relation between popular culture and internet.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ... define the basic differences between the concepts of culture,(Learning Outcomes) high and low culture and popular culture, and examine the difference between various definitions of culture and recognise the relation between popular culture and music, sports and internet and develop the abilities to analyse them.RecommendedReading(s) Easthope, Anthony. (1992). A Critical and Cultural Theory Reader, Buckingham: Open UP. Storey, John. (2000). Cultural Theory and Popular Culture. New York: Longman.
  • Teaching Method(s) Lecturing, Group works.Assessment Method(s) 2 Midterms %40, Group presentations %10, Final exam %50.Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 261 Introduction to Culture StudiesType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Associate Prof Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (3 hours theoretical, 3 hours a week in total)Course Contents • Definition and development of British Cultural Studies • Culture, Definition and theories • Identity and Identity theories • High Culture/Popular culture • Main cultural studies terms and teoriesObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise British Cultural Studies, its main interests and(Learning Outcomes) theories, to examine the main cultural terms. They identify and examine identity and identity theories. They analyse ideological and discursive formations in written, visual and oral texts and contexts.RecommendedReading(s) Barker, Chris. (2000) Cultural Studies: Theory and Practice. London: Sage Publications. Giles, Judy and Tim Middleton. (1999) Studying Culture: A Practical Introduction. Blackwell Publishers.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion and analysis of texts.Assessment Method(s) Two midterms (50 %), final examination (50 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 272 British Poetry and Prose IType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of CreditsAllocated 3 0 3ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (3 theoric, 3 hours a week)Course Contents • History, culture and literature of the Anglo-Saxon period, • History, culture and literature of the Medieval period, • History, culture and literature of the Renaissance period, • Study and analysis of the literary works that belong to these periods: epic (Beowulf). Ballad, lyric, romance (Sir Gawain and the Green Knight), dream-vision poetry, allegory (Piers the Plowman), framed tale (Canterbury Tales), sonnet tradition (sonnets of Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare), pastoral tradition (Shepheardes Calendar), prose (“The Defence of Poesy”)Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise the historical, cultural and literary developments that(Learning Outcomes) took place in England from the Old-English period to the end of the Renaissance. They will also be acquainted with major literary genres and conventions, and will be able to illustrate this knowledge through a study of the texts representative of the literary achievements of the age.RecommendedReading(s) Trapp, J. B. (2002). Medieval English Literature, New York: Oxford UP. Barron, W. R. J. (1987). English Medieval Romance, New
  • York: Longman. Waller, Gary (1993). English Poetry of the Sixteenth Century, London:Longman.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 2 mid-term exams (40%), term paper (10%), ve final exam(50) %.Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 281 The Short StoryType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (3 theoretical, 3 hours/week)Course Contents • The historical development of the short story • The modern short story and relevant theory • The Russian, American and French pioneers of the short story and their work • British short story writers and their work • Two modern Turkish short story writers and their work • Revision of relevant literary terms and their illustrations • A comparative look at the thematic and technical contributions made by the writers to the development of the genreObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop strategies in reading a literary text, analyse the short stories technically and thematically, interpret the short stories, recognise the different usages of technical elements in the short stories, compare the different stylistic approaches of the writers and to develop an aesthetic awareness of the modern short story as a literary genre.RecommendedReading(s)
  • May,C. (1994). The New Short Story Theories. Athens: Ohio ry Theory at Crossroads. Baton Rouge: Lousiana State UP. Head;D. (1992). The Modernist Short Story: A Study in Theory and Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge UP. Lohafer, S. (1989). Short Story Theory at a Crossroads. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University P.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, 10 min. student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 2 mid-term exams (40%), presentation/term-paper (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 282 English Novel IType of Course Compulsory(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Dr.Alev BAYSALPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents .Background: .The rise of the novel in England .Elements of the novel, social and philosophical developments . Realism in the 18th century novel . Major novelists of the period and their worksObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to establish literary, historical, political, social and cultural(Learning Outcomes) relationship and fully recognize the distinctive characteristics of the 18h century England through the in depth analysis of the novels related to this period. Thus, they will be able to develop their critical skills and use them efficiently.RecommendedReading(s) Brantlinger, Patrick, A companion to the Victorian novel Blackwell Oxford, UK 2005 Dennis, Barbara, The Victorian novel. Cambridge University Press Cambridge, U.K. 2000 Ermarth, Elizabeth Deeds, The English novel in history, 1840-1895 Routledge London ;New York 1997Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student
  • presentations.Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%25 and %25), final examination (%40), research and presentation (%10)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 293 AMERICAN CULTURE AND HISTORYType of Course Elective(Compulsory or Elective)Number of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • A survey of American culture and history from the 17th century to the present • Main outlines of native American cultures • The founding of the United States of America, its politics, constitution and key figures • Civil War and its reasons • New technological, political, and cultural developments and events in the U.S in the 19th century • Main political, historical, and cultural developments in the 20th centruy ( Jazz Age, Black Renaissance, Counterculture, Vietnam war and the major political and historical figures)Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to, İdentify American history and culture in its broad outline,(Learning Outcomes) explain the changes in American foreign policy, inicate the impact of American culture on world cultures and history, compare and contrast them, and distinguish their similarities differences, as well as name the major American political and cultural figures through the centuries.Recommended An Outline of American History. (n.d). Office ofReading(s) International Information Programs; United States Department of State. Norton, Mary Beth, Katzman, David M., et al. (2001). A People and a Nation: A History of the United States. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
  • Teaching Method(s) Interactive: presentation, discussion, and student presentationsAssessment Method(s) Two midterms (%50) and Final Exam (%50)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 296 American DramaType of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents The origins and development of American drama and a survey of the representative movements, dramatists and their works from the 1900s to the presentObjective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • summarise the origins and development of drama in(Learning Outcomes) America; • define the representative dramatic movements in America; • categorise the American plays written from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present; • compare and contrast the works of American playwrights; • make an in-depth analysis of the plays written by American writers both in form and content; • develop a critical approach to these plays.Recommended Aranson, Arnold. American Avant-garde Theatre: A History.Reading(s) New York: Routledge, 2000. Berkowitz, Gerald. American Drama of the Twentieth Century. London: Longman, 1992. Long, E. Hudson. American Drama from its Beginnings to the Present. New York: Appleton, 1970.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentations and in-class discussionsAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms (40 %), student presentation (10 %), final
  • examination (50 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and AİT 100, 103, 203 Atatürk’s Principles and the History of the TurkishTıtle: RevolutionCourse Type CompulsoryCourse Credit 2 ECTS Credits 2Lecturer Institute membersPrerequisite(s) NoneCourse Length One semester(2 Hours) *Consepts and Ottoman Modernisation *Young Ottomans, I.-II. Ottoman Constitutional Periods *Development in Europe; Industrial Revolution and French Revolution *World War I and The Partition of The Ottoman Empire *Events after Moudrose Armistice *National Congress Course content: *Ottoman Last Parliament And the National Pact *Turkish National Assambly *The National Struggle1921-1922 *Turkish Foreign Policy in National Struggle *Mudanya Armistice *Lousanne Peace Agreement In this course; The students can explain and comment the Consepts about the course and Ottoman Modernisation movements,Young Ottomans, I.-II. Ottoman Constitutional Periods, Development occured in Europe (Industrial Revolution and French Revolution), World War I and The Partition of Course Objectives The Ottoman Empire, Events after Moudrose Armistice, National Congress, Ottoman Last Parliament And the National Pact, Turkish National Assambly, The National Struggle1921-1922, Turkish Foreign Policy in National Struggle , Mudanya Armistice, Lousanne Peace AgreementReading List -Derviş Kılınçkaya (ed): Atatürk ve Türkiye Cumhuriyeti Tarihi. Siyasal Kitabevi, Ankara, 2004. -Akşin, Sina, İstanbul Hükümetleri ve Milli Mücadele, İstanbul, 1977. -Atatürk, M. Kemal, Nutuk, 3 cilt,13.baskı, İstanbul, 1973. -Bayur, Yusuf Hikmet, Türk İnkılâp Tarihi, 10 cilt, Ankara, 1991. -Berkes, Niyazi, Türkiye’de Çağdaşlaşma, Ankara, 1978. -Lewis, Bernard, Modern Türkiye’nin Doğuşu, Ankara, II. Baskı,1984. -Tansel, Selahattin, Modros’tan Mudanya’ya, IV.cilt, Ankara, 1977Assessment methods: for each semester 2 theoretical midterms (25 %) and 1 theoretical final examination (50%).Language of lecture Turkish
  • Course Code and Tıtle: AİT 100, 104, 204Atatürk’s Principles and the History of the Turkish RevolutionCourse Type CompulsoryCourse Credit 2 ECTS Credits 2Lecturer Institute membersPrerequisite(s) NoneCourse Length One semester(2 Hours) Political Reforms (Abolition of The Sultanate, The Proclamation of The Turkish Republic, The Abolition of The Caliphate *The Political Parties established during Atatürk’s Period and representanted in Turkish National Assembly and Political Events * Refom Movement in the Turkish Law System During The Republican Era. Course content: * Reform Movement in Turkish Education System * Reform Movement in Turkish Economy * Atatürk’s Foreign Policy * Atatürk’s Principles * Turkey After Atatürk (Internal and Foreign Policy) In this course; The students can explain and comment the political reforms (abolition of the Sultanate, The proclamation of the Turkish Republic, The abolition of the Caliphate), Economical, Educational, Socio-Cultural And Judicial Course Objectives reforms performed in Turkey after Turkish National struggle. Beside that, they also evaluate and comment foreign policy performed during and after Atatürk’s period and his principles at the end of the semestre.Reading List -Derviş Kılınçkaya (ed): Atatürk ve Türkiye Cumhuriyeti Tarihi. Siyasal Kitabevi, Ankara, 2004. -Akşin, Sina, İstanbul Hükümetleri ve Milli Mücadele, İstanbul, 1977. -Atatürk, M. Kemal, Nutuk, 3 cilt,13.baskı, İstanbul, 1973. -Bayur, Yusuf Hikmet, Türk İnkılâp Tarihi, 10 cilt, Ankara, 1991. -Berkes, Niyazi, Türkiye’de Çağdaşlaşma, Ankara, 1978. -Lewis, Bernard, Modern Türkiye’nin Doğuşu, Ankara, II. Baskı,1984. -Tansel, Selahattin, Modros’tan Mudanya’ya, IV.cilt, Ankara, 1977Assessment methods: for each semester 2 theoretical midterms (25 %) and 1 theoretical final examination (50%).Language of lecture Turkish
  • Course Code and Title IED 337 Translation IIIType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (3 theoretical, 3 hours a week)Course Contents • Translation methods, • Responsibilities of translator, • Difficulties in translation, • Translation of texts chosen from social sciences (from Turkish to English and from English to Turkish), • Translation of texts chosen from administrative sciences (from Turkish to English and from English to Turkish), • Translation of texts chosen from fine arts and applied sciences (from Turkish to English and from English to Turkish), • Translation of extracts chosen from legal documents (from Turkish to English and from English to Turkish),Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ... Classify certain methods of translation, explain the probable(Learning Outcomes) difficulties of translating certain texts, and practice the methods that he learnt in the translation of texts both in English and Turkish taken from social sciences, administrative sciences, fine arts, applied sciences and legal documents.Recommended Boztaş, İsmail. (2005) Açıklamalı Çeviri Terimleri Sözlüğü.Reading(s) Ankara: Siyasal. Köksal, Dinçay. (1995) Çeviri Kuramları. Ankara: Neyir. Okyayuz, Yener Şirin. (2004) Avrupa Birliği Metinlerinin Çevirisine Yönelik Ekonomi Sözlüğü. Ankara: Siyasal.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions, individual and group worksAssessment Method(s) Midterm I 25%, Midterm II 25%, Final Exam 50%
  • Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 348 Translation IVType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (3 theoretical, 3 hours a week)Course Contents • Translation methods, • Responsibilities of translator, • Difficulties in literary translation, • Translation of extracts chosen various short stories (from Turkish to English and from English to Turkish), • Translation of texts chosen from various novels (from Turkish to English and from English to Turkish), • Translation of extracts chosen from various poems (from Turkish to English and from English to Turkish), • Translation of extracts chosen from various plays (from Turkish to English and from English to Turkish), • Translation of extracts chosen from various types of non- fiction narratives (from Turkish to English and from English to Turkish).Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ... Classify certain methods of translation, observe and explain the(Learning Outcomes) probable difficulties of translating certain literary texts, and practice the methods that he learnt, in the translation of extracts, both in English and Turkish, taken from short stories, novels, poetry, plays and non-fiction narratives.Recommended Boztaş, İsmail. (2005) Açıklamalı Çeviri Terimleri Sözlüğü.Reading(s) Ankara: Siyasal. Köksal, Dinçay. (1995) Çeviri Kuramları. Ankara: Neyir. Yazıcı, Mine. Çeviribiliminin Temel Kavram ve Kuramları. (2005) İstanbul: Multilingual.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions, individual and group worksAssessment Method(s) Midterm I 25%, Midterm II 25%, Final Exam 50%
  • Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 365 British Drama IType of Course C(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents The origins and developments of British drama and a survey of the representative movements, dramatists and their works from the Middle Ages to the end of the 17th century • Rise of the theatre in England (from the Middle Ages to the 15th century) • Elizabethan drama (Tragedy and Comedy of Humours) • Jacobean drama (Tragedy and City Comedy) • Restoration drama (Comedy of Manners)Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • summarise the origins and development of British drama;(Learning Outcomes) • define the representative dramatic genres seen in Britain from the Middle Ages to the eighteenth century; • categorise the British plays written between the Middle Ages and the eighteenth century; • compare and contrast the works of British playwrights who wrote in the mentioned period; • make an in-depth analysis of these plays both in form and content; • develop a critical approach to these plays.Recommended Kastan, David Scott. Staging the Renaissance ReinterpretationsReading(s) of Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama. New York: Routledge, 1991. Mulryne, J.R., and Margaret Shewring, eds. Theatre of the English and Italian Renaissance. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1991.
  • Payne, Fisk Deborah. The Cambridge Companion to English Restoration Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2000.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentations and in-class discussionsAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms (40 %), student presentation (10 %), final examination (50 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 357 gender Studies in English LiteratureType of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Associate Prof. Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (3 hours theoretical, 3 hours a week in total)Course Contents • Relationship between gender and sex • The importance of gender, gender definitions • Gender studies, feminism • Identity, Identity theories and gender, discourse and gender • Gender in English literature • Representations of gender in the mediaObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to tell the difference between gender and sex, recognise the development(Learning Outcomes) of gender theories and identify identity, ideology, feminism in their relation to gender theories and gender construction, to analyse visual, written and oral construction of gender in relevant texts and contexts, to apply the theories and discourses that construct and perpetuate gender.RecommendedReading(s) Giles, Judy and Tim Middleton. (1999) Studying Culture: A Practical Introduction. Blackwell Publishers. Blamires, Alcuin, karen Pratt and C. W. Marx. Eds. (1992) Woman Defamed and Woman Defended: An Anthology of Medieval Texts.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, presentation and textual analysis and reading, discussionAssessment Method(s) Two mid-terms (25 % each, total 50%) , final exam (50%)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 366 ShakespeareType of Course Compulsory(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • Society, politics, culture, and literature in Shakespeare’s time; • The development of Shakespeare’s literary career, and his practice of drama; • Shakespeare’s idea and practice of comedy; a textual study of one of the comedies; • Shakespeare’s idea and practice of tragedy; a textual study of one of the tragedies; • Shakespeare’s “problem” plays, and a textual study of one of the “problem” plays; • Shakespeare’s history plays, and a textual study of one of the history plays; • Shakespeare’s last plays, and a textual study of one of these plays, preferably The Tempest.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, the students will be able to have a working familiarity with the social, political, cultural and(Learning Outcomes) literary aspects of Shakespeare’s time, appreciate and fully understand the development of Shakespeare’s literary career, his contribution to English literature, and his his idea and practice of comedy and tragedy. Moreover, they will also be able to recognize, with a critical sense, the characteristics and distinctive qualities of Shakespeare’s dramatic art through an in-depth textual study of some of his plays. Thus, they will be able to develop their critical skills and use them efficiently.
  • Recommended Chambers, E.K. The Elizabethan Stage. Oxford: Clarendon,Reading(s) 1967. Drakakis, John, ed. Alternative Shakespeares. London: Routledge, 2002. Honan, Park. Shakespeare: A Life. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1998. Bradley, A.C. Shakespearean Tragedy. London: Macmillan, 1975. Bratchell, Dennis Frank. Shakespearean Tragedy. London: Routledge, 1990. Frye, Northrop. Fools of Time: Studies in Shakespearean Tragedy. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1967. Gordon, George S. Shakespearean Comedy and Other Studies. London: Oxford UP, 1965. Charlton, Henry Buckley. Shakespearean Comedy. London: Methuen, 1967. Frye, Northrop. A Natural Perspective: The Development of Shakespearean Comedy and Romance. New York: Columbia UP, 1965. Campbell, Lily B. Shakespeare’s “Histories”: Mirrors of Elizabethan Policy. San Marino, CA: Huntington Library, 1978.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations.Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%25 and %25), final examination (%40), research and presentation (%10)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 368 English Drama IIType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (3 theoretical, 3 hours/week)Course Contents • Representative playwrights, plays and dramatic movements in England from the 18th century to 1950 • Sentimental comedy • Comedy of manners • Closet drama by the Romantics • Examples from Irish drama • Intellectual drama • Verse drama • A comparative look at the plays of the period with regard to their themes and techniquesObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop play- reading strategies, analyse plays with reference to form and content, interpret plays extensively, recognise the peculiarities of the dramatic movements of the period, compare the styles of the dramatists of the period, evaluate the contributions made by English playwrights to the drama of the period and to develop an aesthetic awareness of drama as a literary genre.Recommended
  • Reading(s) Courtney, R.(1982). Outline History of British Drama. New Jersey: Adams. Dietrich, R.F.(1989).British Drama 1890-1950, A Critical History. Boston: Twayne. Innes, C.D. (1992). Modern British Drama, 1890-1990. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, 10 min. student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 2 mid-term exams (40%), presentation/term-paper (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 373 British Poetry and Prose IIType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of CreditsAllocated 3 0 3ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (3 theoric, 3 hours a week)Course Contents • History, culture and literature of the 17th century, • History, culture and literature of the 18th century, • Study and analysis of the literary works that belong to these periods: • Cavalier poetry: poems of Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick Richard Lovelace and Andrew Marvell. • Metaphysical poetry: poems of John Donne, Gerge Herbert. • Extracts from poems and prose works of John Milton • Prose works of Bacon, Locke ve Hobbes. • The major literary principles of the Neo-Classical literature, literary works of Dryden, Pope, Swift and Dr Johnson, • Rise and development of journalism, works of Addison and Steele.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise the historical, cultural and literary developments that(Learning Outcomes) took place in England from the 17th century to the end of the 18th century. They will also be acquainted with major literary genres and conventions, and will be able to illustrate this knowledge through a study of the texts representative of the literary achievements of the age.Recommended Corns, Thomas N. Ed. (1993).The CambridgeReading(s) Companion to English Literature: Donne to Marvell, Cambridge: Cambridge UP.
  • Sambrook, James. (1986). The Eighteen Century: The Intellectual and Cultural Context of English Literature 1700 – 1789, London: Longman. Parker, Blanford. (1998). The Triumph of Augustan Poetics. Cambridge, Cambridge UP.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 2 mid-term exams (40%), term paper (10%), ve final exam(50) %.Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 376 British Poetry and Prose IIIType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of CreditsAllocated 3 0 3ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (3 theoric, 3 hours a week)Course Contents • History, culture and literature of the late 18th, and the 19th centuries, • Study and analysis of the literary works that belong to these periods: • Pre-Romanticism and Romanticism: poems of W.Blake, W.Wordsworth, S.T.Coleridge, Lord Byron, P.B.Shelley and J.Keats, • Literary tradition during the Victorian period:poems of A.Tennyson, Robert Browning, M.Arnold, and the prose works of T.Carlyle, J.Ruskin and J.S. Mill, • Pre-Raphalelite movement, poems of D.G.Rossetti and A.C.Swinburne, • Victorian women poets, poems of E.B.Browning and C.Rossetti.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise the historical, cultural and literary developments that(Learning Outcomes) took place in England from the late 18th century to the end of the 19th century.They will also be acquainted with major literary genres and conventions of the Pre-Romantic, Romantic and Victorian periods, and will be able to illustrate this knowledge through a study of the texts representative of the literary achievements of the age.Recommended Armstrong, Isobel. (1993). Victorian Poetry: Poetry,Reading(s) Poetics and Politics, London: Routledge.
  • Wolfson, Susan J. (1997). Formal Changes:The Shaping of Poetry in British Romanticism. Stanford: Stanford UP. Woodman, Thomas M. (1998) Early Romantics: Perspectives in British Poetry from Pope to Wordsworth. New York: St. Martin Press.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 2 mid-term exams (40%), term paper (10%), ve final exam(50) %.Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 381 Types of Non-FictionType of Course Elective(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Dr.Alev BAYSALPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents . Introduction: .The meaning of narrative .Types of narrative (Fictional and non-fictional narratives) .Study of different narrative types: .Diary .Biography and autobiography . .Letters .Travel writingObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to label the non-fictional narrative types by comparing and(Learning Outcomes) contrasting with the fictional ones. Reading the examples of different non- types of non-fiction, they will able to argue and discuss the major characteristics of them. Thus, they will be able to develop their critical skills and use them efficiently.Recommended Campbell, MatthewReading(s) Memory and memorials, 1789-1914 : literary and cultural perspectives Routledge London ;New Yor 2000 Lawrence, Karen, Penelope voyages : women and travel in the British literary tradition Cornell University Press Ithaca, N.Y. 1994 Siegel, Kristi,
  • Gender, genre, and identity in womens travel writing P. Lang New York 2004Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations.Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%25 and %25), final examination (%40), research and presentation (%10)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 387 English Novel IIType of Course Compulsory(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Dr.Alev BAYSALPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents .19th century background .Realism, naturalism, social, philosophical, and scientific developments, .Victorian values and imperialism . Major novelists of the period and their worksObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to establish literary, historical, political, social and cultural(Learning Outcomes) relationship and fully recognize the distinctive characteristics of the 19th century England through the in depth analysis of the novels related to this period. Thus, they will be able to develop their critical skills and use them efficiently.Recommended Cohen, Monica F. 0521591414Reading(s) Professional domesticity in the Victorian novel : women, work, and hom Cambridge University Press Cambridge, U.K. 1998 Jenkins, Alice, Rereading Victorian fiction Palgrave [Houndmills, Ba 2000 Raitt, Suzanne. May Sinclair : a modern Victorian Clarendon Press ;Oxford Univer Oxford :Oxford 2000Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations.
  • Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%25 and %25), final examination (%40), research and presentation (%10)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 388 English Novel IIIType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (3 theoretical, 3 hours a week)Course Contents • The analysis of the philosophical and scientific novelties of Bergson, Jung , Freud , W. James, Woolf and Joyce. in the first half of the 20.th century. • The analysis of the novels chosen for the course from the perspective of Moderrnism. • The analysis of the chosen novels: Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Forster’s A Passage to India.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) • Define and classify the scientific and philosophical novelties that were initiated by Bergson, Jung , Freud , W. James, Woolf and Joyce in the first half of the 20th century, • Analyse technically and thematically the novels, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Forster’s A Passage to India, within the framework of the scientific and philosophical innovations that prapared the birth and development of Modernism. • Explain the technical variations in the novels.Recommended Bradbury, Malcolm. (1993) The Modern British Novel. London:Reading(s) Penguin. Waugh, Patricia. (1992) Practicing Postmodernism, reading Modernism. London:Edward Arnold. Ellman, Richard and Charles Fiedelson (eds.) (1965) The Modern Tradition. London: Penguin.
  • Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions.Assessment Method(s) Midterm I. 25%, Midterm II. 25%, Final Exam 50%Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 398 AMERICAN POETRYType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(3 hours theoretical,3 credits)Course Contents Study of Basic movements and developments in American poetry • Colonial period • Romantics • Modernism, imagism • Harlem Renaissance, Beat Movement • 1950 to present, Black Mountain School, New York SchoolObjective of the Course At he end of the semester the student will be able to give brief information on the characteristics of the main movements and(Learning Outcomes) schools of American poetry, analyse the poems and state the characteristics of the schools in them, identify the movements of the poems, compare and contrast the schools and various poems.Recommended Hyatt, Waggoner.(1968) American Poets from the Puritans toReading(s) the Present. New York: Dell. Lawrence,D.H.(1977) Studies in Classical American Literature. New York: Penguin.Teaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with films, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 40 %, project and /or research 10% ,final 50 %Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 441 Literary Theory and Criticism IType of Course Compulsory(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • The basic uses of criticism, and the relationship between literature and criticism; • The rise and development of criticism and literary theory in the Western literary tradition: A. Literary theory and criticism in classical antiquity (Plato’s Ion and The Republic, Aristotle’s The Poetics, and Horace’s De Arte Poetica): B. Literary theory and criticism in the Middle Ages; C. Literary theory and criticism in the Continental Renaissance ; • Literary theory and criticism in English literature (from the Renaissance to the beginnings of the 20th century: Sidney, Ben Jonson, Dryden, Johnson, the Romantics, Arnold, and TS Eliot).Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognize and understand the uses of criticism and the(Learning Outcomes) relationship between literature and criticism, have a working familiarity with the rise and development of literary theory and criticism from the classical antiquity onwards; in particular, they will be able to acquire an in- depth understanding of the classical,medieval, and Renaissance formulations of literary theory and criticism through a close study of Plato, Aristotle, Horace, medieval and Renaissance theorists. Moreover, they will be able to be fully informed about literary theory and criticism in English literature from the Renaissance to the
  • early 2oth century, with particular reference to Sidney, Ben Jonson, Dryden, Johnson, the Romantics, Arnold, and TS Eliot.Recommended Blamires, Harry. A History of Literary Criticism. London:Reading(s) Macmillan, 1991. Grube, G.M.A. The Greek and Roman Critics. London: Methuen, 1965. Hayden, John O. Polestar of the Ancients. London: Associated University Presses, 1979. Kennedy, George A., ed. Classical Criticism. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1981. Vol. 1 of The Cambridge History of Criticism. Russell, D.A. Criticism in Antiquity. Berkeley: U of California P, 1981. Minnis, A.J., and A.B. Scott, eds. Medieval Literary Theory and Criticism c.1100 – c.1375: The Commentary Tradition. Rev.ed. Oxford: Clarendon, 1988. Engell, James. Forming the Critical Mind: Dryden to Coleridge. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard UP, 1989.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations.Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%25 and %25), final examination (%40), research and presentation (%10)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 444 CONTEMPORARY LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM IIType of Course Compulsory(Compulsory or Elective)Number of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • Introduction to contemporary literary theory and criticism • The New Criticism, Russian Formalism, Structuralism, Post- Structuralism, the New Historicism, Hermeneutics, Reader- Response Theory, Feminist Literary Criticism, Psychoanalytical Criticism, Ecocriticism, and their key concepts • The representative theorists from each critical school • application of the theories and interpretation techniques in literary texts • the changing concept of languageObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to,(Learning Outcomes) identify the major contemporary literary theories, the key concepts in each, analyse the main theoretical and interpretive methods, apply and illustrate these in literary texts, as well as compare and contrast the different interpretive strategiesRecommended Barry, Peter. (1995). Beginning Theory: An Introduction toReading(s) literary and cultural Theory. Manchester: Manchester UP. Bressler, Charles E. (1994). Literary Criticism: An Introduction to Theory and Practice. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Tyson, Lois. (1999). Critical Theory Today: A Use-
  • Friendly Guide. London: Garland.Teaching Method(s) Interactive: presentation, discussion, and student presentationsAssessment Method(s) Two midterms (%50) and Final Exam (%50)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 447 COMPARATIVE LITERATUREType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(3 hours theoretical,3 credits)Course Contents Study of the related genres, fable,saying,fairy tale, bestiary ,beast epic,allegory which make use of animal stories. • Fable:Aesop, Marie de France, Henryson, La Fontaine,M Balbay • Bestiary • Fairytale/short story: Deniz Kızı, Nazlı Eray Karakolda.. • beastepic:Reynard • Satire/Allegory:Gulliver’s Travels, Orwell Animal Farm • Lewis Charonicles of NarniaObjective of the Course At he end of the semester the student will be able to give brief information on the characteristics of the main related genre(Learning Outcomes) mentioned above, to identify them according to their characteristics, analyse the texts, compare and contrast them and to analyse and discuss new textsRecommended Blackham,H.J.(1985) The Fable as Literature. London:Reading(s) AthalonTeaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with films, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 40 %, project and /or research 10% ,final 50 %Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 448 POSTCOLONIAL BRITISH LITERATUREType of Course Compulsory(Compulsory or Elective)Number of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • Introduction to Postcolonial Theory and British literature • Evaluation and analysis of Postcolonial literary texts • Introduction to key concepts in postcolonial theory, and literature • Discussion of the main themes and topics in the articles written by postcolonial writers and theorists • Analysis of the postcolonial writers and theorists’ contributions to British culture and literatureObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to,(Learning Outcomes) identify the new developments, key concepts, new themes and topics, and the new theories in postcolonial British culture and literature, recognize the postcolonial theory’s effects on British literature, and explain the reasons behind postcolonial theory’s emergence, evaluate the themes and topics related to postcolonial culture and literaures.Recommended -Young,Robert, J.C. (2001). Postcolonialism: An HistoricalReading(s) Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell. -Loomba, Ania (1998). Colonialism/Postcolonialism. London: Routledge. -Thieme, John. Ed.(1996). The Arnold Anthology of Postcolonial Literatures. London: Arnold. -Patrick Williams and Laura Chrisman. Eds. (1993). Colonial Discourse and Postcolonial Theory:A Reader.
  • Teaching Method(s) Interactive: presentation, discussion, and student presentationsAssessment Method(s) Two midterms (%50) and Final Exam (%50)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 463 British Drama IIIType of Course C(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents The developments of British drama and a survey of representative movements, dramatists and their works from the 1950s to 1980 • Drama in the 1950s and 1960s (Angry Young Man Movement, Absurd Drama, Brecht and Epic Theatre, Comedy of Menace) • Drama from 1960 to 1980 (Farce, comedy of manners, psychological drama, theatre of cruelty) • Anglo-Irish dramaObjective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • define the representative dramatic movements seen in(Learning Outcomes) Britain from the 1950s to 1980; • categorise the British plays written between the 1950s and 1980; • compare and contrast the works of British playwrights who wrote in the mentioned period; • make an in-depth analysis of these plays both in form and content; • develop a critical approach to these plays; • comment on different aspects of Anglo-Irish plays.Recommended Eyre, Richard. Changing Stages: A View of British Theatre in theReading(s) Twentieth Century. London: Bloomsbury, 2000. Hayman, Ronald. British Theatre since 1955: A Reassessment. New York: Oxford UP, 1979.
  • Rusinko, Susan. British Drama, 1950 to the Present: A Critical History. Boston: Twayne, 1989.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentations and in-class discussionsAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms (20 %), student presentation (10 %), final examination (50 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 466 British Drama IVType of Course C(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents The developments of British drama and a survey of representative dramatists and their works from the 1980s to the present • An Introduction to agit-prop, feminism, multiculturalism, the gay movement and Anglo-Irish drama • Dark comedy of manners • Political drama • Multicultural drama • Feminist drama • Gay drama • Intellectual comedy • Anglo-Irish dramaObjective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • define the representative dramatic genres seen in Britain(Learning Outcomes) from 1980 to the present; • categorise the British plays written from 1980 to the present; • compare and contrast the works of British playwrights who wrote in the mentioned period; • make an in-depth analysis of these plays both in form and content; • develop a critical approach to these plays; • comment on different aspects of Anglo-Irish plays written in the mentioned period.Recommended Acheson, James. British and Irish Drama since 1960. New York:Reading(s) St. Martin’s, 1993.
  • Berney, K. A. Contemporary British Dramatists. London; Detroit: St. James, 1994. Bigsby, C. W. E. Contemporary English Drama. New York: Holmes, 1981.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentations and in-class discussionsAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms (40 %), student presentation (10 %), final examination (50 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 475 British Poetry and Prose IVType of Course C(Compulsory or Elective)Number of CreditsAllocated 3 0 3ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (3 theoric, 3 hours a week)Course Contents • History, culture and literature of the first half of the 20th century, • Study and analysis of the literary works that belong to that period, • Study of technical and thematic novelties, • Poets of the World War I: poems of R.Brooke, S.Sasson, W.Owen, • Modernist movement and the poems of T.S.Eliot, • Poems of D.H.Lawrence and W.B.Yeats, • Poetry of the 1930’s, polilitical poetry: poems of W.H.Auden and L.Mac Neice, • 1940’s and Neo-Romanticism, poems of D.Thomas.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise the historical, cultural and literary developments that(Learning Outcomes) took place in England in the first half of the 20th century. They will also be acquainted with major literary genres and conventions along with the technical and thematic novelties in poetry. They will be able to illustrate this knowledge through a study of the texts representative of the literary achievements of the age.Recommended Draper, R.P. (1999). An Introduction to Twentieth-CenturyReading(s) Poetry in English. New York: St Martins. Faulkner, Peter. (1986). A Modernist reader: Modernism in
  • England, London: Batsford. Stead, C. K. (1986). Pound, Yeats, Eliot, and the Modernist Movement, Basingstoke:Macmillan.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 2 mid-term exams (40%), term paper (10%), and final exam(50) %.Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 478 British Poetry and Prose VType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of CreditsAllocated 3 0 3ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (3 theoric, 3 hours a week)Course Contents • History, culture and literature from the 1950’s to the present, • Study and analysis of the literary works that belong to that period, • Study of technical and thematic novelties, • The Movement poets, poems of P.Larkin, • Poems of T.Hughes and S.Heaney, • Poetry of the 1980’s ve 1990’s, poems of Duncan Bush, Paul Durcan, Simon Armitage, Linton Kwesi Johnson, • Women poets, poems of Carol Ann Duffy, Jackie Kay, Grace Nichols, Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill, Lavinia Greenlaw.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise the historical, cultural and literary developments that(Learning Outcomes) took place in England in the second half of the 20th century. They will also be acquainted with major literary genres and conventions along with the technical and thematic novelties in poetry. They will be able to illustrate this knowledge through a study of the texts representative of the literary achievements of the age.Recommended Acheson, James and Romana Huk. (1996). ContemporaryReading(s) British Poetry. New York: State UP. Adcock, Fleur. (1987).The Faber Book of Twentieth Century Women’s Poetry. London: Faber.
  • Hulse, Michael, et al., eds. (1993). The New Poetry, Newcastle: Bloodaxe.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 2 mid-term exams (40%), term paper (10%), ve final exam(50) %.Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 485 English Novel IVType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) CNumber of Credits 303AllocatedECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (3 theoretical, 3 hours a week)Course Contents • Socio-political and philosophical innovations started after the 1960s and continue till the present. • The analysis of new theories, terms and concepts seen after the 1960s, • The analysis of J. Winterson’s Boating for Beginners, John Fowles’s Mantissa, P. Ackroyd’s Chatterton, Malcolm Bradbury’s Changing Places ve Graham Swift’s Waterland, and practising the new theories on these novels.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) • Define Socio-political and philosophical innovations started after the 1960s and continue till the present. • Explain and differentiate the features of the first half of the 20th century from the second with reference to the new terms and theories, • Analyse J. Winterson’s Boating for Beginners, John Fowles’s Mantissa, P. Ackroyd’s Chatterton, Malcolm Bradbury’s Changing Places and Graham Swift’s Waterland with reference to the new social, political and philosophical innovations that were given voice to in new formal and thematic changes.Recommended Hutcheon, L. (1989) The Poetics of Postmodernism. London:Reading(s) Routledge. ---, (1990) The Politics of Postmodernism. London: Routledge Waugh, P. (1984) Metafiction. London: Methuen Lee, A. (1990) Realism and Power: Postmodern British Fiction. London: Routledge.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions.
  • Assessment Method(s) Midterm I. 25%, Midterm II. 25%, Final Exam 50%Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 498 AMERICAN NOVELType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ElectiveNumber of CreditsAllocated 303ECTS Credits 6Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • American Novel in the colonial period • American Novel during the 19th century • American Novel during the 20th century • The impact of Transcendentalist, Modernist andPostmodernist movements on the development of contemporary American novelObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to, identify the technical and thematic dvelopment of the novel in(Learning Outcomes) the U.S from its emergence in the Colonial period to the present, analyze and interpret and distiguish how the main American socio-cultural values and topics are reflected in specific novels from different time periods, and identify and critically interpret the modernist and postmodernist approaches in contemporary American novels.Recommended Bradbury, Malcolm. (1993). The Modern American Novel,Reading(s) New York: Viking Press. Federman, Raymond. (1993). Critifiction: Postmodern Essays, Albany: State University of New York Press.Teaching Method(s) Interactive: presentation, discussionAssessment Method(s) Two midterms (%50) and Final Exam (%50)Medium of Instruction English
  • 7. GRADUATE PROGRAMMES AND DESCRIPTIONS7.1. English Language and LiteratureGRADUATE COURSES ECTS (MA/Ph.D) 1. IED 6/703 The Idea of Utopia and Utopia in English Literature 8/10 2. IED 6/716 Contemporary Philosophical Trends 8/10 3. IED 6/720 British Women Poets 8/10 4. IED 6/721 Women Playwrights 8/10 5. IED 6/727 Comedy of Manners 8/10 6. IED 6/728 English Political Drama 8/10 7. IED 6/739 Satire 8/10 8. IED 6/743 Comparative Novel 8/10 9. IED 6/744 Comparative Drama 8/10 10. IED 6/749 Renaissance English Drama (Excluding Shakespeare) 8/10 11. IED 6/753 Medieval English Literature 8/10 12. IED 6/756 Chaucer 8/10 13. IED 6/757 Medieval English Drama 8/10 14. IED 6/760 Shakespeare’s Comedies 8/10 15. IED 6/762 Shakespeare’s History Plays 8/10 16. IED 6/764 Shakespeare’s Problem Plays 8/10 17. IED 6/766 Renaissance English Literature 8/10 18. IED 6/769 Milton 8/10 19. IED 6/773 18th Century English Novel 8/10 20. IED 6/777 19th Century English Novel 8/10 21. IED 6/781 Victorian Poetry 8/10 22. IED 6/783 20th Century English Poetry 8/10 23. IED 6/784 20th Century English Novel (till 1950s) 8/10 24. IED 6/785 English War Poets 8/10 25. IED 6/790 Contemporary British Poetry 8/10 26. IED 6/791 English Theatre from the 1950s to the Present 8/10 27. IED 6/793 Contemporary British Novel 8/10 28. IED 6/794 Popular Literature 8/10
  • 7.1.1. Masters in English Language and LiteratureCourse Code and Title İED 603 The Idea of Utopia and Utopia in English LiteratureType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • At the outset, the idea of utopia, its place in the European history of ideas, and the origins and development of the utopian idea are studied; • Following this preliminary study, the myth of the Golden Age, Plato’s utopian ideas, pastoral idealism and the Arcadian idea, and the utopian ideas in Christianity are focused on; • Within the context of this broad context, the idea of utopia in English literature and its development from Sir Thomas More to our time are studied extensively with reference to sample works; • Moreover, dystopia as the antithesis of the utopian idea and its representation in English literature is also dwelt on comprehensively.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to acquire a broad and in-depth familiarity with the idea of(Learning Outcomes) utopia and its historical and conceptual extent, know about the development of the utopian idea from its origins onwards and how it has been understood in every age, become aware of various representations in literature of this idea, make critical comments and evaluations with regard to various texts based on the utopian idea, and, in particular, acquire a full knowledge of utopia in English literature and of its antithesis, dystopia, through a close
  • study of sample texts.Recommended Bobonich,Christopher. Platos Utopia Recast : His LaterReading(s) Ethics and Politics. Oxford:Clarendon Press, 2004 Plato.The Republic. London: Penguin ,1987 Butler,Samuel, Erewhon and Erewhon Revisited. New York: The Modern Library,1927. More,Thomas, Utopia. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press, 2002. Claeys,Gregory.The Utopia Reader. New York: New York University Press,1999. Ferns,Chris. Narrating Utopia: Ideology, Gender, Form in Utopian Literature. Liverpool : Liverpool University Press, 1999.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations (minimum 2).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 616 CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHICAL TRENDSType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • Introduction to contemporary philosophical trends • Ideas of important philosophers that effected literature • Frankfurt School thinkers • Postmodern and Post-Structuralist philosopers • Ecophilosophy and social problemsObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to, Recognize different philosophical approaches, identify their(Learning Outcomes) socio-political, and cultural effects, distinguish key philosophical concepts and theories, and interpret ideas from carious schools of thought.Recommended Arato, Andrew and Eike Gebhardt, Eds. (1992). TheReading(s) Essential Frankfurt School Reader, New York: Continuum. Lechte, John. (1994). Fifty Key Contemporary Thinkers, New York: Routledge. Kellner, Douglas and Steven Best. (1991). Postmodern Theory: Critical Interrogations, New York: The Guilford Press.Teaching Method(s) Interactive: introduction,discussion, student presentationsAssessment Method(s) 2 term Papers (%45), short review essays (%15) and Final Exam (%40)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 620 British Women PoetsType of Course(Obligatory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 4 0 4ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 theoric, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • Study of poems by British women’s poets from the Old English period to the present within the context of historical, social and cultural background. • Women’s place in the society through ages and how they are presented in the predominant literary tradition, and their place as poets in the canon. • Anonymous lyrics ang elegies from the Old English period and Medieval Period that are atttributed to women poets. Poems of J.of Norwich ve M.Kempe, • Women poets of the Renaissance period, poems by Queen Elizabeth I, Countess of Pembroke and Lady Mary Wroth, • Women poets of the 17th century, poems by Margaret Cavendish, • Women poets of the 18th century, poems by Anne Finch, • Women poets of the late 18th and the early 19th centuries, poems by L.E.Landon and F.Hemans, • Women poets of the Victorian period, poems by E.B.Browning, C.Rossetti, • Women poets of the 20th century, poems by Carol Ann Duffy, Jackie Kay, Grace Nichols, Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill, Lavinia Greenlaw.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise British women poets, their works and their(Learning Outcomes) contribution to the poetic tradition from the Old English period to the present. They will be able to illustrate this knowledge through a study of the texts representative of the literary
  • achievements of the women poets. The students will also be able to evaluate woman’s role in life, society and literature both as an individual and as a poet through centuries.Recommended Barratt, Alexandra, ed. (1992).Women’s Writing in MiddleReading(s) Ages. London: Longman. Greer, Germaine. (1995). Slip-Shod Sibyls: Recognition, Rejection and the Women Poet. London: Viking. Pritchard, R.E. ed. (1990).Poetry by English Women: Elizabethan to Victorian. Manchester: Fyfield. Shaw, Marion, ed. (1998). An Introduction to Women’s Writing: From the Middle Ages to the Present Day. London: Prentice Hall.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 2 formal presentations (30%), 1 mid-term exam (20%), class participation (20%) and final exam (30%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 621 Women PlaywrightsType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • English women playwrights and their representative plays from the 17th century to the present • Women’s social position in the plays and in the times the plays were written • The socio-cultural and historical background of the setting of the plays and the times they were written • Anayses of dramatic movements, where applicable • Feminist theories • Themes dealt with in the plays • The forms of the plays and the techniques used • Thematic and technical contributions made by women dramatists to drama • A comparison of the output of women playwrights with that of their male counterparts in the same periodObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop play- reading strategies, analyse plays with reference to form and content, interpret plays extensively, recognise the peculiarities of the dramatic movements of the period, compare the styles of the women dramatists of the same period, evaluate the contributions made by English women playwrights to the drama in different periods, to compare the output of English women dramatists with that
  • of their male counterpatrs in the same period and to develop an aesthetic awareness of women’s drama.RecommendedReading(s) Brater, E. (1989). Feminine Focus: The New Women Playwrights. Oxford: Oxford U P. Witte, A. (1996). Guiding the Plot: Politics and Feminism in the Work of Women Playwrights. New York: P. Lang. Donkin, E. (1995). Getting into Act: Women Playwrights in London, 1776-1829. New York: Routledge. .Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 3 presentation/term-papers (30%), 2 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 627 Comedy of MannersType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • The thematic and technical characteristics of the Restoration comedy of manners • Examples of comedies of manners in England from the 17th century to the present • The contributions of the dramatists at different times to the genre • The changes in the thematic and technical characteristics viewed in the genre over the centuriesObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop play-reading stategies, recognise the thematic and technical features of the Restoration comedy of manners, analyse examples of comedies of manners form the 17th century to the present, observe and interpret the changes in the genre over the centuries and assess the development.RecommendedReading(s) Young, D.M. (1997). The Feminist Voices in Restoration Comedy. Lanham, Md.: University Press of America.
  • McMillin, S. (1997). Restoration and Eighteenth Century Comedy. New York: W.W. Norton Co. Hirst; D.L. (1979). Comedy of Manners. London: Methuen.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 3 presentation/term-papers (30%), 2 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 628 English Political DramaType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • The political background of 20th century England • 20th century English dramatists who wrote political plays and their works, the reflection of the political milieu in drama • The political events and persons dealt with in the plays • Piscator’s theoretical contributions to the genre • Brecht and the impact of Epic Theatre on the genre • The form and technical aspect of the plays • Agit-prop, workers’ theatre, street theatre, documentary theatre • A comparative look at the thematic and technical contributions made by the playwrights to the development of the genreObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop play- reading strategies, analyse plays with reference to form and content, interpret plays extensively, recognise the peculiarities of political plays of different periods, compare the stylistic approach of the dramatists, evaluate the contributions made by playwrights to the genre and to develop an aesthetic awareness of political drama.Recommended
  • Reading(s) Willet, J. (1986). The Theatre of Erwin Piscator: Half a C Politics in the Theatre. London: Eyre Methuen. Fraser, S. (1996). A Politic Theatre: The Drama of David Hare. Amsterdam: Rodopi. Garner, S.B. (1999). Trevor Griffiths: Politics, Drama, History. Ann Arbor: UMI Research.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 3 presentation/term-papers (30%), 2 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 639 SATIREType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents Study of the general characteristics of related genres, satire, parody, burlesque • Satire in Aristophanes • Roman satire Juvenile,Horace,Persius • Medieval English satire,Chaucer, Langland,Henryson • Dryden, Donne, Pope,Swift, OrwellObjective of the Course At he end of the semester the student will be able to give brief information on the characteristics of the main related genre(Learning Outcomes) mentioned above, to identify them according to their characteristics, analyse the texts, compare and contrast them and to analyse and discuss new textsRecommended Highet,Gilbert. (1962)The Anatomy of Satire.NewReading(s) Jersey:Princeton UP. Sutherland,James. (1967) English Satire. Cambridge:UP. Ramage,Sigbee,Fredericks.(1974) Roman Satirists and their Satire. New Jersey: Noyes P.Teaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with films, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, project and /or research 10% ,1 formal paper%20 ,final 50 % MMedium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 643 COMPARATIVE NOVELType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • Introduction to comparative fiction studies • Comparing North-American and European novels from different time periods • Theories and origins of the novel genre in Europe • contemporary trends in European and North-American novels • Comparing Turkish novels with selected examples from Anglo- American, Canadian, and European novelsObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to,(Learning Outcomes) compare and contrast Turkish, European and North-American novels according to the theories of comparative fiction, name and interpret the differences and similarities among various novels from different time periods, and evaluate how literary movements have affected the novel on both sides of the Atlantic.Recommended Bakhtin, M.M. (1981). The Dialogic Imagination,Reading(s) Austin:University of Texas Press. Moretti, Franco. (1998). Atlas of the European Novel:1800- 1900, New York: Verso Miner, Earl. (1990). Comparative Poetics: An Intercultural Essay on Theories of Literature, Princeton,N.J: Princeton University Press.Teaching Method(s) Interactive: introduction, discussion, student presentationsAssessment Method(s) 2 term Papers (%45), short review essays (%15) and Final Exam (%40)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 644 Comparative DramaType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • Representative plays written in various countries from the 19th century to 1950 • Ireland (Yeats, Synge, Shaw), America (O’Neill, Miller, Wilder), France (Genet, Ionesco), Germany (Brecht), Italy (Pirandello), Spain (Lorca), Sweden (Strindberg), Norway (Ibsen), Switzerland (Dürenmatt), Russia ( Chekhov) • Relevant dramatic movements • Analysis of the plays applying relevant literary theory • A comparative look at the technical and thematic contributions of the dramatists from the United States and Ireland and across Europe to drama within the given time spanObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop play- reading strategies, analyse plays with reference to form and content, interpret plays extensively, recognise the peculiarities of the dramatic movements, compare the styles of the dramatists, compare and evaluate the contributions made by the playwrights to drama and to develop an aesthetic awareness of mainly European drama written between the second half of the 19th century to 1950.RecommendedReading(s) C. Schumaher.(1996). Naturalism and Symbolism in European Theatre 1850-1918. Cambridge: Cambridge U P.
  • R. Gaskell.(1972). Drama and Research: European Theatre since Ibsen. New York: Routledge & K. Paul. J. Gassner. (1951). A Treasury of the Theatre. New York: Simon and Schuster. .Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 3 presentation/term-papers (30%), 2 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 649 Renaissance English Drama (Excluding Shakespeare)Type of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents • The rise and development of the Renaissance tragedy and comedy • A comparative and in-depth study in form and content of the English plays written during the reigns of Elizabeth I, James I and Charles (Excluding Shakespeare’s works)Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • define the dramatic genres seen in Enland in the period(Learning Outcomes) between 1485 and the mid-seventeenth century; • categorise the English plays written from 1485 to the mid-seventeenth century; • compare and contrast the works of British playwrights who wrote in the mentioned period; • make an in-depth analysis of these plays both in form and content; • develop a critical approach to these plays; • comment on different aspects of these plays.Recommended Cairns, Christopher. The Renaissance Theatre: Texts,Reading(s) Performance, Design. Aldershot, Hants, England; Brookfield, Vt.: Ashgate, 1999. Hart, Jonathan. Reading the Renaissance: Culture, Poetics and Drama. New York: Garland, 1996. Sisson, Charles J. The Elizabethan Dramatists Except Shakespeare. London: Ernest Benn, 1979.
  • Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentations and in-class discussionsAssessment Method(s) 2 formal papers (40 %), participation in class discussions (20 %), final examination (40 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 653 Medieval English LiteratureType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Associate Prof Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours a week in total)Course Contents • Medieval English culture and society • Major literary forms, genres and writers of the Middle Ages • Romance tradition, French and English romances • Dream poetry, conventions and examples • The debate tradition • Mystical, hagiographical writing and women writers • Letter writing and medieval lettersObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise medieval English works and writers, to analyse the writers and(Learning Outcomes) their works in a comparative context, to examine and identify medieval literary conventions, to compare medieval literary conventions and writers, to recognise the relationship between medieval culture and literature and their interdependence.Recommended Burrow, J.A. (1989) Medieval Writers and Their Work: MiddleReading(s) English Literature and Its Background 1100-I500. Oxford: Oxford UP. Hanavalt, Barbara. Ed.(1992). Chaucers England: Literature in Historical Context. Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota Press, I992. Lawton, David.(1982). Middle English Alliterative Poetry and Its Literary Background: Seven Essays. D.S. Brewer. Other relevant books and articles
  • Teaching Method(s) Lecture, presentation, discussion and text analysisAssessment Method(s) Two papers (20%+25 %), Final exam (25 %), Class participation and contribution (30 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 656 CHAUCERType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents • Study of the contemporaries and classical sources that influences Chaucer(Roman de la Rose, Dante,Virgil, etc) • Study of early dream vision poems(Book of the Duchess,House of Fame, Parlement of Foules, Legend of Good Women) • Canterbury Tales framed tale • Troilus and Criseyde romanceObjective of the Course At he end of the semester the student will be able to trace the influences on Chaucer’s works in the texts, identify the genre of(Learning Outcomes) the texts analyse the texts, compare and contrast them with each other and other works , comment on the characteristics of the poet’s language, style,versification etc.and evaluate his contributions to English literature.Recommended Cooper, Helen.(1989) Oxford Guides to Chaucer:GP.Reading(s) Oxford:UP. Windeat, Barry.(1992) Oxford Guides to Chaucer:Troilus and Criseyde. Oxford:Clarendon. Kean ,P.M.( 1972) Chaucer and the Making of English Poetry. London: Routledge.Teaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with audio visual material, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, project and /or research 10% ,1 formal paper%20 ,final 50 % M
  • Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 657 MEDIEVAL ENGLISH DRAMAType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents • Social,political, historical background of the Middle Ages • Literature,literacy,rituals,feasts, para dramatic activities • Folk theatre, rituals,liturgical drama • Mytery and miracle plays,staging and acting • Morality plays( (Everyman,Wisdom,Castle of Perseverance) • Reformation,renaissance humanism ,emergence of professional drama, interludes • The Four Ps,Fulgens and Lucrese, Wit and Science, The Three Laws.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the student will be able to identify mystery,miracle,morality plays and interludes. Give the(Learning Outcomes) characteristics of the se plays as well as folk plays ,liturgy and other paradramatic activities. Their staging and acting. Establish their relations with literary works and oral activities such as preaching. Comment on the staging and handling of the plot. Compare and contrast the staging and acting of medieval plays and the interludes and comment on various developments leading to Elisabethian drama.Recommended Happe, Peter.(1999) English Drama Before Shakespeare. NewReading(s) York & London :Longman Beadele, Richard.(1994) The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Theatre. Cambridge:UP. Goodman, Jennifer. (1990) British Drama Before 1660.Teaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with audio visual material, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, project and /or research 10% ,2 formal papers
  • 20% ,final 50 % MMedium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 660 Shakespeare’s ComediesType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • A definition (Aristotelian, and modern) of comedy; the classical origins and types of comedy; • The influence of classical comedy on the Renaissance understanding of comedy as a dramatic form; • The idea and uses of comedy in Renaissance English literature and its influence on Shakespeare; • Shakespeare’s idea and practice of comedy, and the distinctive characteristics of his comedies in general; • A close study of, at least, 5 Shakespearean comedies textually and with reference to modern critical studies.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to acquire a working knowledge of comedy as a literary genre,(Learning Outcomes) recognize the development of comedy from its classical origins to the Renaissance, become familiar with the idea and practice of comedy in Renaissance English literature, understand Shakespeare’s idea and use of comedy and his contributions, thereof, to the development of comedy, enhance their critical and exegetical skills through a close textual and critical study of, at least, 5 Shakespearean comedies.Recommended Martz, William J. Shakespeare’s Universe of Comedy. NewReading(s) York: D. Lewis, 1971. Felperin, Howard. Shakespearean Romance. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1972.
  • Richmond, Hugh M. Shakespeare’s Sexual Comedy: A Mirror for Lovers. Indianapolis: Bobbs Merril, 1971. Berry, Ralph. Shakespeare’s Comedies: Explorations in Form. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1972. Lerner, Laurence, ed. Shakespeare’s Comedies: An Anthology of Modern Criticism. Harmondsworth, Eng.: Penguin, 1967. Gordon, George S. Shakespearean Comedy and Other Studies. London: Oxford UP, 1965. Charlton, Henry Buckley. Shakespearean Comedy. London: Methuen, 1967.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations (minimum 2).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 662 Shakespeare’s History PlaysType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • At the outset, an historical account is given of the social, political, cultural and international aspects of the period from the 1580s to the 1590s as a background of Shakespeare’s writing of history plays; • Reference is made to the historiographical sources of the time that provided Shakespeare with material and ideas; • Focus is put on the political, social, governmental, and judicial matters that Shakespeare problematizes in his history plays; • All this is followed by a close textual and critical study of Shakespeare’s 10 history plays within the context outlined above.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, the students will be able to acquire full familiarity with the social, political,(Learning Outcomes) international, and cultural aspects of the 1580 and 1590s and understand the impact of this period on Shakespeare’s writing of history plays, understand Shakespeare’s use of historiographical sources, recognize the thematic, typological, stylistic and structural qualities of Shakespeare’s 10 historical plays and appreciate them by developing a critical sense and with reference to the political, social, governmental, international and cultural circumstances of the time.
  • Recommended Berry, Edward I. Patterns of Decay: Shakespeare’s EarlyReading(s) Histories. Charlotteville: UP of Virginia, 1975. Blanpied, John W. Time and the Artist in Shakespeare’s English Histories. Newark: U of Delaware P, 1983. Calderwood, James L. Metadrama in Shakespeare’s Henriad: Richard II to Henry V. Berkeley and Los Angeles: U of California P, 1979. Campbell, Lily B. Shakespeare’s “Histories”: Mirrors of Elizabethan Policy. San Marino, CA: Huntington Library, 1978. Champion, Larry S. “The Noise of Threatening Drum”: Dramatic Strategy and Political Ideology in Shakespeare and the English Chronicle Plays. Newark: U of Delaware P, and London: Associated UPs, 1990. Dollimore, Jonathan and Alan Sinfield, eds. Political Shakespeare: Essays in Cultural Materialism. 2nd ed. 1985. Manchester: Manchester UP, 1994.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations (minimum 2).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 664 Shakespeare’s Problem PlaysType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • At the outset, Shakespeare’s “problem” plays and their intrinsic qualities are identified, following a conceptual and critical discussion of the term “problem plays”; • Moreover, by way of a foregrounding, the theoretical and critical but often contradictory and controversial approaches made by modern critics to Shakespeare’s problem plays are reviewed and assessed through a metacritical perspective; • This is followed by an in-depth study of the “problem” plays, commonly identified as Troilus and Cressida (1602), All’s Well That Ends Well (1603), and Measure for Measure (1604); • Also in this study are included Julius Caesar (1599), Hamlet (1601), Anthony and Cleopatra (1607), and Timon of Athens (1607), which have been categorized by some critics as the other problem plays.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, the students will be able to acquire familiarity with those plays by Shakespeare that(Learning Outcomes) have been categorized by modern critics as “problem plays,” have a critical understanding of the modern views about them and make their own criticial assessments; they can formulate their own critical views on Shakespeare’s “problem plays” by making a close textual and critical study of these plays, based on a
  • comprehensive research and comparative analysis, identify the moral, judicial, social, cultural, and conceptual problems embedded in the plays, and, thus, develop their own critical and scholarly skills.Recommended Ure, Peter. Shakespeare: The Problem Plays. 3rd ed.Reading(s) London: Longman, 1970. Shanzer, Ernest. The Problem Plays of Shakespeare: A Study of ‘Julius Caesar,’ ‘Measure for Measure,’ ‘Antony and Cleopatra.’ London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1963. Lawrence, W.W. Shakespeare’s Problem Comedies. 3rd ed. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1969. Tillyard, E.M.W. Shakespeare’s Problem Plays. London: Chatto and Windus, 1950. Thomas, Vivian. The Moral Universe of Shakespeare’s Problem Plays. London and Sydney: Croom Helm, 1987. Hillman, Richard. William Shakespeare: The Problem Plays. New York: Twayne, 1993.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations (minimum 2).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 666 Renaissance English LiteratureType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 4 0 4ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 theoric, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • European Renaissance and the rise and development of Humanism, • The influences of Petrarchism, Neo-Platonism and Reformation on Renaissance thought, • Historical, cultural, political condition in Renaissance England, • The study of representative poets of the Renaissance English literature and their works (excluding Spenser and drama), • The rise and development of sonnet tradition, sonnets by Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Shakespeare and Lady Mary Wroth, • The study of prose works by Ascham, Puttenham, Sidney, • The study of other literary genres, epic, pastoral and Ovidian/mythological poetry.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise European Renaissance and the rise and development of(Learning Outcomes) Humanism. They will be able to recognise its influences on England and Renaissance English Literature (excluding drama). They will be able to evaluate the effects of historical, cultural, political changes on literature and to illustrate this knowledge through a study of the texts representative of the literary achievements of the age.Recommended Greenblatt, Stephen Jay ed. (1988) Representing the EnglishReading(s) Renaissance, Berkely: U of California Press.
  • Hay, Jeff ed. (2002) The Renaissance, San Diego: Greenhaven. Kristeller, Paul Oskar (1980) Renaissance Thought and the Arts : Collected Essays, Princeton:Princeton UP. Malcolmson, Christina ed. and int. (1998) Renaissance Poetry, Essex:Longman.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 2 formal presentations (30%), 1 mid-term exam (20%), class participation (20%) and final exam (30%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 669 MiltonType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • At the outset, in order to form a framework of reference and identify the circumstances which had a constructive impact on Milton’s literary and political ideas, a full account is given of the social, political, cultural, and literary changes and developments that came to the fore in the transition from the Elizabethan to the Stuart period; • An historical overview of the political, social, judicial, cultural, governmental and monarchic circumstances of the period from the accession of James I to the Restoration, with particular emphasis on the policies of James I, Charles I, and Cromwell, is presented; • Moreover, the literary developments of the period are extensively dwelt on; • The, in the context of all these preliminary accounts and studies, Milton’s literary development, sources of ideas and concepts, dependence upon the classical and humanistic tradition, and contribution to English literature are studied in depth and discussed theoretically, critically, and historically; • Along these studies and discussions, his early poetry, political and polemical writings, and major works Samson Agonistes, Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained are studied in depth and critically.
  • Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to establish literary, historical, political, social and cultural(Learning Outcomes) relationship and fully recognize the distinctive characteristics of the Stuart period; they will be fully familiar with the developments in this period and have a framework of reference to read and appreciate Milton intelligently. They can then situate Milton not only in the social, political and cultural context of the period but also in the Renaissance literary tradition as well as in the literary setting of his own time. They can also have a full and in-depth knowledge of all of Milton’s works, discuss and interpret them through a critical approach and, thus, develop their own skills of criticism and scholarship.Recommended Parry, Graham. The Seventeenth Century: The IntellectualReading(s) and Cultural Context of English Literature, 1603-1700. London: Longman, 1989. MacCallum, Hugh. Milton and The Sons of God: The Divine Image in Milton’s Epic Poetry. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1986. Featheringill, Ron. The Tension between Divine Will and Human Free Will in Milton and the Classical Epic Tradition. New York: P. Lang, 1990. Loewenstein, David. Milton and the Drama of History: Historical Vision, Iconoclasm, and the Literary Imagination. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1990. Pavlock, Barbara. Eros, Imıtation, and the Epic Tradition. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1990. Martindale, Charles. John Milton and the Transformation of Ancient Epic. London: Croom Helm, 1986.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations (minimum 2).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 673 18. Century English NovelType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • The analysis of socio-political changes and literary innovations in 18th century England. • Besides Richardson, Fielding and Defoe, the analysis of the works of Margaret Cavendish, Delariviere Manley and Aphra Behn who contributed in the development of the genre in the 17th century. • The appraisal of the works of Elizabeth Inchbald, Charlotte Lennox, Charlotte Smith, Fanny Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Amelia Opie, M. Brunton, Sarah Fielding, Mary Wollstonecraft who contributed in the development of the novel as a popular genre employing feministic themes. • The analysis of Lady Morgan in the birth of political novel and of Mary Hays in autobiographical novel and Ann Radcliffe in the gothic novel.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ... • define the social and political situation in 17th and 18th(Learning Outcomes) century England, • observe in the early examples the birth and the development of the genre, • Analyse not only the works of wellknown novelists such as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smolett and Sterne, but also differentiate the works of the women novelists who contributed in the birth and development of the novel from the works of the male writers. • Understand the thematic and technical variations in various new examples of the genre.Recommended • Ballaster, Ros (1992) Seductive Forms: Women’sReading(s)
  • Amatory Fiction from 1684 to 1740, Oxford: Clarendon. • Craft-Fairchild, Catherine (1993) Masquerade and Gender: Disguise and Female Identity in Eighteenth Century Fictions by Women, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State UP. • Figes, Eva (1982) Sex and Subterfuge: Women Writers to 1850, London: Macmillan. • Rogers, Katharine M. and William McCarthy eds. (1987) The Meridian Anthology of Early Women Writers, Middlesex: Penguin. • Spender, Dale (1986) Mothers of the Novel, London: Pandora. • Spender, Dale ed. (1992) Living by the Pen: Early British Women Writers, New York: Teacher’s College. • Spender, Dale ed. (1992) Living by the Pen: Early British Women Writers, New York: Teacher’s College. • Turner, Cheryl (1992) Living by the Pen: Women Writers in the 18th Century. London:Routledge.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions, individual and group worksAssessment Method(s) Midterm I 20%, Midterm II 20%, presentations 20%, Final Exam 40%Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 677 19th Century English NovelType of Course Elective(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Dr.Alev BAYSALPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents .Social and political circumstances that affect the Victorian novel .Relevant terms and concepts in literary criticism alongside the social issues in the Victorian period .Relationships of the individual to society and its institutions (such as law, religion, industry and politics), problems of identity, questions of love, morality and marriage, as well as the issues of gender and class. . Realism in the Victorian novel .The role of the novelist investigating and articulating these issuesObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to establish literary, historical, political, social and cultural(Learning Outcomes) relationship and fully recognize the distinctive characteristics of the 19th century England through the in depth analysis of the novels related to this period. Thus, they will be able to develop their critical skills and use them efficiently.Recommended Altick, Richard Daniel,Reading(s) The Presence of the present : topics of the day in the Victorian novel Ohio State University Press Columbus 1991 Blake, Andrew. Reading Victorian fiction : the cultural context and ideological conte Macmillan [London] 1989
  • Eigner, Edwin M. Victorian criticism of the novel / edited by Edwin M. Eigner and Georg Cambridge University Press Cambridge [Camb 1985Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations.Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 and %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 681 Victorian PoetryType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 4 0 4ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 theoric, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • History, culture and literature of the the 19th century, and the study the literary works that belong to the period: • Poets and the poetic tradition during the Victorian period: poems of A.Tennyson, Robert Browning, M.Arnold, • Prose works during the Victorian period:prose works by T.Carlyle, J.Ruskin ve J.S. Mill, M.Arnold, • Pre-Raphalelite movement, poems of D.G.Rossetti and A.C.Swinburne, • Victorian women poets: poems of L.E.Landon, F.Hemans, E.B.Browning and C.Rossetti.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise the history, culture and literature of the the 19th(Learning Outcomes) century. They will also be acquainted with major literary genres and conventions of the Victorian period. Their research and argumentation skills will be enhanced through a study and analysis of the works by the represantative writers of the period.RecommendedReading(s) Armstrong, Isobel. (1993). Victorian Poetry: Poetry, Poetics and Politics, London: Routledge. Harrison, Antony H. (1998). Victorian Poets and the Politics of Culture : Discourse and Ideology, Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia. Christ, Carol T. et al., eds. (1995). Victorian Literature
  • and the Victorian Visual Imagination, Berkeley : University of California Press.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 2 formal presentations (30%), 1 mid-term exam (20%), class participation (20%) and final exam (30%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 683 20th Century English PoetryType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Associate Prof. Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours a week in total)Course Contents • Transition from the 19th century to the twentieth century, the shift in the understanding of poetry • Poetry of the first quarter of the twentieth century, Georgians, the war poets and Thomas Hardy • Modernism, T. S. Eliot and the modernist poets • The poetry of Yeats and D. H. Lawrence • Political poetry of the 1930s, the Auden generation • Neo-romantic poetry of the 1940s, Dylan Thomas.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to examine the major developments in the twentieth century(Learning Outcomes) English poetry, to analyse the contributions of modernism and the changes it makes in poetry, to examine in a comparative context the influence of modernism on the poetry of the 1930s and the 1940s, to recognise and apply the knowledge of poetic developments in reading poems of the twentieth century English poets.RecommendedReading(s) Childs, Peter. (1999). The Twentieth Century in Poetry: A Critical Survey. Routledge. Featherstone, Simon. (1995). War Poetry: An Introductory Reader. Routledge. Perkins, David. (1987). A History of Modern Poetry: Modernism and After. Harvard: Belknap. Other relevant books and articles
  • Teaching Method(s) Lecture, presentations, discussion and analysis of poems.Assessment Method(s) Two presentations (20 %+25 %) Contribution and class participation (30 %), final (25 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 684 20. Century English Novel (till 1950s)Type of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • The analysis of the philosophical, social and scientific changes and theories in the first half of the 20th century and their impact on the modernist novel, • The analysis of the ideas and innovations of the writers and philosophers such as Bergson, Jung, Freud, W. James, Woolf and Joyce. • The definiton of the Modernist elements of the novels chosen for the course, • The analysis of the experimental techniques in the novels of the significant novelists such as James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, E.M. Forster, Ford Madox Ford and George Orwell, • The stylistic and thematic features of the novelists in the 1930s and 1050s, who attampted to revive realistic features in the novel genre. • The novels chosen for the course: Conrad The Nigger of Narcissus ve Lord Jim, Ford The Good Soldier and Parade’s End, D.H. Lawrence Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Rainbow, Woolf Three Guineas and The Waves, Joyce Ulysses and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Beckett Trilogy, Waugh A Handful of Dust, Orwell Animal Farm and 1984.Objective of the Course At the end of the course, the students will be able to, • Classify and define the innovative philosophies and ideas(Learning Outcomes) of Bergson, Jung, Freud, W. James, Woolf and Joyce who lived in the first half the 20th century, • Observe technical and thematic changes in the novels chosen for the course as modernist examples of the novel genre and they are able to analyze and explain the
  • modernist elements of the novels.Recommended Bradbury, Malcolm. (1993) The Modern British Novel. London:Reading(s) Penguin. Waugh, Patricia. (1992) Practicing Postmodernism, reading Modernism. London:Edward Arnold. Ellman, Richard and Charles Fiedelson (eds.) (1965) The Modern Tradition. London: Penguin. Childs, Peter.(2000) Modernism. London: Routledge.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions, individual and group worksAssessment Method(s) Midterm I 20%, Midterm II 20%, presentations 20%, Final Exam %40Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 685 English War PoetsType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 4 0 4ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 theoric, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • War as a topic in literature, • The causes and characteristics of World War I, Britain’s social and political attitude towards the war, critical controversies about English war poetry, • The leading World War I poets and their poems: Rupert Brooke, Julian Grenfell, Charles H. Sorley, Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, Robert Graves, Edmund C. Blunden, Edward Thomas, Ivor Gurney, Isaac Rosenberg, David Jones, Herbert Read, Robert Nichols, F.W. Harvey, Arthur G. West, • The women poets and their poems: Vera Brittain, Jessie Pope ve Winifred Letts, • The World War II poets and their poems: Elizabeth Jennings, Keith Douglas, Hamish Henderson, John Wedge, Charles Robinson and Henry Reed, the. • Poets who have written about the Falkland War: David Morgan, R.J. Latham.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise “English war poetry,” which holds a special place in(Learning Outcomes) 20th-century English poetry in view of the poets’ representation of war through variant feelings and thoughts by relying upon their own individual observations and experiences of a war environment. Moreover, through a study of the poems on World War II and on Falkland War, the students will be able to understand and appreciate the special importance that war poetry has within 20th-century English poetry. Their research and argumentation skills will be enhanced through a further study of the social, political and cultural aspects.
  • Recommended Banarjee, A. (1976). Spirit above Wars: A Study of theReading(s) English Poetry of the Two World Wars, London: Macmillan. Crawford, F. D. (1988). British Poets of the Great War, Selinsgrove: Susquehanna UP. Johnston, John H. (1964). English Poetry of the First World War: A Study in the Evolution of Lyric and Narrative Form, Princeton: Princeton UP.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 2 formal presentations (30%), 1 mid-term exam (20%), class participation (20%) and final exam (30%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 690 Contemporary British PoetryType of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Associate Prof Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours a week in total)Course Contents • Poetic movements and poets in the second half of the twentieth century in Britain • The mid-century poetry, Movement poets • Developments in British poetry in the 1970s • Contemporary British poetry, the poetry of the 1980s and onwards. • Postmodern poetry and political social poetry of the contemporary period. • Plurality in contemporary British poetryObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to explain modernism and its place in British poetry, to(Learning Outcomes) examine the developments and changes in British poetry after the 1950s and the movement poetry, to analyse and compare the contribution of Ted Hughes and Seamus Heaney to British poetry, to analyse contemporary British poets and the changes they introduce to poetry, to recognise the postmodern, social political contemporary British poetry and its plurality.Recommended Allnutt, Gillian. (1988). The New British poetry, 1968-88.Reading(s) London:Grafton Boks. Day, Gary. (1997). British poetry from the 1950s to the 1990s : politics and art. London:Macmillan. Parker, Jonathan. (1995). Poetry in Britain and Ireland since 1970. London: British Council. Other relevant books and articles
  • Teaching Method(s) Lecture, analysis, discussion, comparison and presentationAssessment Method(s) Two papers/presentations( 20 %+25 %), Class participation and contribution (30 %), Final (25 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 691 English Theatre from the 1950s to the PresentType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • Postwar English dramatists and their representative plays • Dramatic movements of the period • Themes dealt with in the plays • Forms and techniques used in the plays • Application of relevant literary theory in analysing the plays • Thematic and technical contributions made by the playwrights to the drama of the periodObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop play- reading strategies, analyse plays with reference to form and content, interpret plays extensively, recognise the peculiarities of the dramatic movements, compare the styles of the dramatists, compare and evaluate the contributions made by the playwrights to drama and to develop an aesthetic awareness of English drama form the 1950s to the present.RecommendedReading(s) Guralnick, E.S. (1996). S Sight Unseen: Beckett, Pinter, Stoppard and other Contemporary Dramatists. Ohio: Ohio U P. K. Berney, K.A. (1994). Contemporary British Dramatists. London: St. James Press.
  • Zeifman, H. (1993). Contemporary British Drama 1970-1990. London: Macmillan.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 3 presentation/term-papers (30%), 2 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 693 Contemporary British NovelType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • The literary movements and social changes in the 1950s, • Social, cultural and political changes in the 1960s, • The literary movements and social changes in the 1970s, • Postmodern literary theories, • Cultural changes and the social structure of the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, the debate between the History and the novel genre, fabulation, metafiction, historiographic metafictionmultiplicity, postmodern parody, postmodern conceptualisation of character and author • Novels:1950s: Kingsley Amis. Lucky Jim, Malcolm Bradbury. Eating People Is Wrong, Graham Greene. The End of the Affair; 1970s till present: John Banville. Dr. Copernicus, Julian Barnes. Flauberts Parrot, John Fowles. Daniel Martin, A Maggot, William Golding. Paper Men, D.M. Thomas, Lying Together, Graham Swift. Waterland, Peter Ackroyd. Hawksmoor, The Trial of Elizabeth Cree, Penelope Lively. Cleopatras Sister, Penelope Fitzgerald. The Blue Flower, Jeanette Winterson. Boating For Beginners, The Gut Symmetries, Jim Crace. The Gift of Stones, Patricia Duncker. Hallucinating Foucault, Derek Beaven. Newtons Niece, Ben Okri. Astonishing the Gods,Robert Irwin. The Arabian NightmareObjective of the Course At the end of the semestre, the students will be able to, • Classify and differentiate the postmodern concepts,(Learning Outcomes) movements and cultural changes from those that took place earlier in the century, • Define the postmodern features of the novel, • Analyse and appreciate the postmodern novels from the
  • perspective of postmodern theories and movements.Recommended Hutcheon, L. (1989) The Poetics of Postmodernism. London:Reading(s) Routledge. ---, (1990) The Politics of Postmodernism. London: Routledge Waugh, P. (1984) Metafiction. London: Methuen Lee, A. (1990) Realism and Power: Postmodern British Fiction. London: Routledge.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions, individual and group worksAssessment Method(s) Midterm I 20%, Midterm II 20%, presentations %20, Final Exam 40%Medium of Instruction English
  • Dersin Kodu ve Adı İED 694 POPULAR LITERATUREType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents The study of popılar literature genres such as science fiction,fantasy, horror annd detective stories. Tolkein Hobbit, Wells Time Machine, Verne Journey to the Moon, R Graves I Cladius, Rowling Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, Lewis Chronicles of Narnia, Baigent& Leigh Holy Blood Holy Grail.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the student will be able to identify The various genre of popular literature,summarise their(Learning Outcomes) characteristics,compare and contrast works with each other and with works of the cannon and evaluate them.Recommended Cawelti,John.(1976) Adventure, Mystery, Romance. UPReading(s) Chicago. Herbert,Rosemary,ed.(1999) The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery. Oxford:UP.Teaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with audio visual material, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, project and /or research 10% ,2 formal papers 20% ,final 50 % MMedium of Instruction English
  • 7.1.2. PhD in English Language and LiteratureCourse Code and Title İED 703 The Idea of Utopia and Utopia in English LiteratureType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • At the outset, the idea of utopia, its place in the European history of ideas, and the origins and development of the utopian idea are studied; • Following this preliminary study, the myth of the Golden Age, Plato’s utopian ideas, pastoral idealism and the Arcadian idea, and the utopian ideas in Christianity are focused on; • Within the context of this broad context, the idea of utopia in English literature and its development from Sir Thomas More to our time are studied extensively with reference to sample works; • Moreover, dystopia as the antithesis of the utopian idea and its representation in English literature is also dwelt on comprehensively.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to acquire a broad and in-depth familiarity with the idea of utopia and its(Learning Outcomes) historical and conceptual extent, knows about the development of the utopian idea from its origins onwards and how it has been understood in every age, becomes aware of various representations in literature of this idea, makes critical comments and evaluations with regard to various texts based on the utopian idea, and, in particular, acquires a full knowledge of utopia in English literature and of its antithesis, dystopia, through a close study of sample texts.
  • Recommended Bobonich,Christopher. Platos Utopia Recast : His Later EthicsReading(s) and Politics. Oxford:Clarendon Press, 2004 Plato.The Republic. London: Penguin ,1987 Butler,Samuel, Erewhon and Erewhon Revisited. New York: The Modern Library,1927. More,Thomas, Utopia. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press, 2002. Claeys,Gregory.The Utopia Reader. New York: New York University Press,1999. Ferns,Chris. Narrating Utopia: Ideology, Gender, Form in Utopian Literature. Liverpool : Liverpool University Press, 1999.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and comprehensively research- based student presentations (minimum 3).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 716 CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHICAL TRENDSType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • Introduction to contemporary philosophical trends • Ideas of important philosophers that effected literature • Frankfurt School thinkers • Postmodern and Post-Structuralist philosopers • Ecophilosophy and social problemsObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to, Recognize different philosophical approaches, identify their(Learning Outcomes) socio-political, and cultural effects, distinguish key philosophical concepts and theories, and interpret ideas from carious schools of thought.Recommended Arato, Andrew and Eike Gebhardt, Eds. (1992). TheReading(s) Essential Frankfurt School Reader, New York: Continuum. Lechte, John. (1994). Fifty Key Contemporary Thinkers, New York: Routledge. Kellner, Douglas and Steven Best. (1991). Postmodern Theory: Critical Interrogations, New York: The Guilford Press.Teaching Method(s) Interactive: introduction,discussion, student presentationsAssessment Method(s) 3 term Papers (%45), short review essays (%15) and Final Exam (%40)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 718 CULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT IN BRITAINType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • Introduction to ecophilosophy and environmental ethics • Deep Ecology Movement • Eco-cultural studies and its impact on society and environment • Biocentrism, and key environmental concepts • Ecophilosophy and social problems • British approaches to the green issuesObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to, Recognize environmental problems and discuss solutions on(Learning Outcomes) global climate change and its social and cultural effects with respect to British cultural studies, describe environmental concepts, examine the relationship between the environment and culture, and analyze critical ecological issues.RecommendedReading(s) Simmons, I.G. (1993). Interpreting Nature: Cultural Constructions of the Environment, New York: Routledge. Pepper, David. (1984). The Roots of Modern Environmentalism, London: Routledge. Sessions, George. (1995). Deep Ecology for the 21st Century, Boston: Shambhala. White, Daniel R. (1998). Postmodern Ecology, Albany: State University of New York Press.Teaching Method(s) Interactive: introduction,discussion, student presentationsAssessment Method(s) 3 term Papers (%45), short review essays (%15) and Final Exam (%40)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 720 British Women PoetsType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 4 0 4ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 theoric, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • Study of poems by British women’s poets from the Old English period to the present within the context of historical, social and cultural background. • Women’s place in the society through ages and how they are presented in the predominant literary tradition, and their place as poets in the canon. • Anonymous lyrics ang elegies from the Old English period and Medieval Period that are atttributed to women poets. Poems of J.of Norwich ve M.Kempe, • Women poets of the Renaissance period, poems by Queen Elizabeth I, Countess of Pembroke and Lady Mary Wroth, • Women poets of the 17th century, poems by Margaret Cavendish, • Women poets of the 18th century, poems by Anne Finch, • Women poets of the late 18th and the early 19th centuries, poems by L.E.Landon and F.Hemans, • Women poets of the Victorian period, poems by E.B.Browning, C.Rossetti, • Women poets of the 20th century, poems by Carol Ann Duffy, Jackie Kay, Grace Nichols, Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill, Lavinia Greenlaw.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise British women poets, their works and their(Learning Outcomes) contribution to the poetic tradition from the Old English period to the present. They will be able to illustrate this knowledge through a study of the texts representative of the literary
  • achievements of the women poets. The students will also be able to evaluate woman’s role in life, society and literature both as an individual and as a poet through centuries.Recommended Barratt, Alexandra, ed. (1992).Women’s Writing in MiddleReading(s) Ages. London: Longman. Greer, Germaine. (1995). Slip-Shod Sibyls: Recognition, Rejection and the Women Poet. London: Viking. Pritchard, R.E. ed. (1990).Poetry by English Women: Elizabethan to Victorian. Manchester: Fyfield. Shaw, Marion, ed. (1998). An Introduction to Women’s Writing: From the Middle Ages to the Present Day. London: Prentice Hall.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 3 formal presentations (30%), 1 mid-term exam (20%), class participation (20%) and final exam (30%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 721 Women PlaywrightsType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • English women playwrights and their representative plays from the 17th century to the present • Women’s social position in the plays and in the times the plays were written • The socio-cultural and historical background of the setting of the plays and the times they were written • Anayses of dramatic movements, where applicable • Feminist theories • Themes dealt with in the plays • The forms of the plays and the techniques used • Thematic and technical contributions made by women dramatists to drama • A comparison of the output of women playwrights with that of their male counterparts in the same periodObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop play- reading strategies, analyse plays with reference to form and content, interpret plays extensively, recognise the peculiarities of the dramatic movements of the period, compare the styles of the women dramatists of the same period, evaluate the contributions made by English women playwrights to drama in different periods, to compare the output of English women dramatists with that
  • of their male counterpatrs in the same period and to develop an aesthetic awareness of women’s drama.RecommendedReading(s) Brater, E. (1989). Feminine Focus: The New Women Playwrights. Oxford: Oxford U P. Witte, A. (1996). Guiding the Plot: Politics and Feminism in the Work of Women Playwrights. New York: P. Lang. Donkin, E. (1995). Getting into Act: Women Playwrights in London, 1776-1829. New York: Routledge.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 4 presentation/term-papers (30%), 3 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 727 Comedy of MannersType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • The thematic and technical characteristics of the Restoration comedy of manners • Examples of comedies of manners in England from the 17th century to the present • The contributions of the dramatists at different times to the genre • The changes in the thematic and technical characteristics viewed in the genre over the centuriesObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop play-reading stategies, recognise the thematic and technical features of the Restoration comedy of manners, analyse examples of comedies of manners form the 17th century to the present, observe and interpret the changes in the genre over the centuries and assess the development.RecommendedReading(s) Young, D.M. (1997). The Feminist Voices in Restoration Comedy. Lanham, Md.: University Press of America.
  • McMillin, S. (1997). Restoration and Eighteenth Century Comedy. New York: W.W. Norton Co. Hirst; D.L. (1979). Comedy of Manners. London: Methuen.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 4 presentation/term-papers (30%), 3 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 728 English Political DramaType of Course(Compulsory or EElective)Number of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • The political background of 20th century England • 20th century English dramatists who wrote political plays and their Works; reflection of the political milieu in drama • The political events and persons dealt with in the plays • Piscator’s theoretical contributions to the genre • Brecht and the impact of Epic Theatre on the genre • The form and technical aspect of the plays • Agit-prop, workers’ theatre, street theatre, documentary theatre • A comparative look at the thematic and technical contributions made by the playwrights to the development of the genreObjective of the At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...Course Develop play- reading strategies, analyse plays with reference(Learning Outcomes) to form and content, interpret plays extensively, recognise the peculiarities of political plays of different periods, compare the stylistic approach of the dramatists, evaluate the contributions made by playwrights to the genre and to develop an aesthetic awareness of political drama.Recommended
  • Reading(s) Willet, J. (1986). The Theatre of Erwin Piscator: Half a Century of the Theatre. London: Eyre Methuen. Fraser, S. (1996). A Politic Theatre: The Drama of David Hare. Amsterdam: Rodopi. Garner, S.B. (1999). Trevor Griffiths: Politics, Drama, History. Ann Arbor: UMI Research.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 4 presentation/term-papers (30%), 3 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of EnglishInstruction
  • Course Code and Title İED 739 SATIREType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents Study of the general characteristics of related genres, satire, parody, burlesque • Satire in Aristophanes • Roman satire • Medieval English satire,Chaucer, Langland,Henryson • Dryden, Donne, Pope,Swift, OrwellObjective of the Course At he end of the semester the student will be able to give brief information on the characteristics of the main related genre(Learning Outcomes) mentioned above, to identify them according to their characteristics, analyse the texts, compare and contrast them and to analyse and discuss new textsRecommended Highet,Gilbert. (1962)The Anatomy of Satire.NewReading(s) Jersey:Princeton UP. Sutherland,James. (1967) English Satire. Cambridge:UP. Ramage,Sigbee,Fredericks.(1974) Roman Satirists and their Satire. New Jersey: Noyes P.Teaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with films, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, 3 project and /or research 10% ,2 formal parers, final 50 % PMedium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 743 COMPARATIVE NOVELType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • Introduction to comparative fiction studies • Comparing North-American and European novels from different time periods • Theories and origins of the novel genre in Europe • contemporary trends in European and North-American novels • Comparing Turkish novels with selected examples from Anglo- American, Canadian, and European novelsObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to, compare and contrast Turkish, European and North-American(Learning Outcomes) novels according to the theories of comparative fiction, name and interpret the differences and similarities among various novels from different time periods, and evaluate how literary movements have affected the novel on both sides of the Atlantic.Recommended Bakhtin, M.M. (1981). The Dialogic Imagination,Reading(s) Austin:University of Texas Press. Moretti, Franco. (1998). Atlas of the European Novel:1800- 1900, New York: Verso Miner, Earl. (1990). Comparative Poetics: An Intercultural Essay on Theories of Literature, Princeton,N.J: Princeton University Press.Teaching Method(s) Interactive: introduction,discussion, student presentationsAssessment Method(s) 3 term Papers (%45), short review essays (%15) and Final Exam (%40)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 744 Comparative DramaType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • Representative plays written in various countries from the 19th century to 1950 • Ireland (Yeats, Synge, Shaw), America (O’Neill, Miller, Wilder), France (Genet, Ionesco), Germany (Brecht), Italy (Pirandello), Spain (Lorca), Sweden (Strindberg), Norway (Ibsen), Switzerland (Dürenmatt), Russia ( Chekhov) • Relevant dramatic movements • Analysis of the plays applying relevant literary theory • A comparative look at the technical and thematic contributions of the dramatists from the United States and Ireland and across Europe to drama within the given time spanObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop play- reading strategies, analyse plays with reference to form and content, interpret plays extensively, recognise the peculiarities of the dramatic movements, compare the styles of the dramatists, compare and evaluate the contributions made by the playwrights to drama and to develop an aesthetic awareness of mainly European drama written between the second half of the 19th century to 1950.RecommendedReading(s) C. Schumaher.(1996). Naturalism and Symbolism in European Theatre 1850-1918. Cambridge: Cambridge U P.
  • R. Gaskell.(1972). Drama and Research: European Theatre since Ibsen. New York: Routledge & K. Paul. J. Gassner. (1951). A Treasury of the Theatre. New York: Simon and Schuster. .Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 4 presentation/term-papers (30%), 3 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 749 Renaissance English Drama (Excluding Shakespeare)Type of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents • The rise and development of the Renaissance tragedy and comedy • A comparative and in-depth study in form and content of the English plays written during the reigns of Elizabeth I, James I and Charles (Excluding Shakespeare’s works)Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • define the dramatic genres seen in Enland in the period(Learning Outcomes) between 1485 and the mid-seventeenth century; • categorise the English plays written from 1485 to the mid-seventeenth century; • compare and contrast the works of British playwrights who wrote in the mentioned period; • make an in-depth analysis of these plays both in form and content; • develop a critical approach to these plays; • comment on different aspects of these plays.Recommended Cairns, Christopher. The Renaissance Theatre: Texts,Reading(s) Performance, Design. Aldershot, Hants, England; Brookfield, Vt.: Ashgate, 1999. Hart, Jonathan. Reading the Renaissance: Culture, Poetics and Drama. New York: Garland, 1996. Sisson, Charles J. The Elizabethan Dramatists Except Shakespeare. London: Ernest Benn, 1979.
  • Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentations and in-class discussionsAssessment Method(s) 4 formal papers (40 %), participation in class discussions (20 %), final examination (40 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 753 Medieval English LiteratureType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Associate Prof Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours a week in total)Course Contents • Medieval English culture and society • Major literary forms, genres and writers of the Middle Ages • Romance tradition, French and English romances • Dream poetry, conventions and examples • The debate tradition • Mystical, hagiographical writing and women writers • Letter writing and medieval lettersObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise medieval English works and writers, to analyse the writers and(Learning Outcomes) their works in a comparative context, to examine and identify medieval literary conventions, to compare medieval literary conventions and writers, to recognise the relationship between medieval culture and literature and their interdependence.Recommended Burrow, J.A. (1989) Medieval Writers and Their Work: MiddleReading(s) English Literature and Its Background 1100-I500. Oxford: Oxford UP. Hanavalt, Barbara. Ed.(1992). Chaucers England: Literature in Historical Context. Minneapolis: Univ. of Minnesota Press, I992. Lawton, David.(1982). Middle English Alliterative Poetry and Its Literary Background: Seven Essays. D.S. Brewer. Other relevant books and articles
  • Teaching Method(s) Lecture, presentation, discussion and text analysisAssessment Method(s) Two papers (20%+25 %), Final exam (25 %), Class participation and contribution (30 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 756 CHAUCERType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents • Study of the contemporaries and classical sources that influences Chaucer(Roman de la Rose, Dante,Virgil, etc) • Study of early dream vision poems(Book of the Duchess,House of Fame, Parlement of Foules, Legend of Good Women) • Canterbury Tales framed tale • Troilus and Criseyde romanceObjective of the Course At he end of the semester the student will be able to trace the influences on Chaucer’s works in the texts, identify the genre of(Learning Outcomes) the texts analyse the texts, compare and contrast them with each other and other works , comment on the characteristics of the poet’s language, style,versification etc.and to evaluate his contributions to English literature.Recommended Cooper, Helen.(1989) Oxford Guides to Chaucer:GP.Reading(s) Oxford:UP. Windeat, Barry.(1992) Oxford Guides to Chaucer:Troilus and Criseyde. Oxford:Clarendon. Kean ,P.M.( 1972) Chaucer and the Making of English Poetry. London: Routledge.Teaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated withaudio visual material, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, 3 project and /or research 10% ,2 formal parer, final 50 % PMedium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 757 MEDIEVAL ENGLISH DRAMAType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents • Social,political, historical background of the Middle Ages • Literature,literacy,rituals,feasts, para dramatic activities • Folk theatre, rituals,liturgical drama • Mytery and miracle plays,staging and acting • Morality plays( (Everyman,Wisdom,Castle of Perseverance) • Reformation,renaissance humanism ,emergence of professional drama, interludes • The Four Ps,Fulgens and Lucrese, Wit and Science, The Three Laws.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the student will be able to identify mystery,miracle,morality plays and interludes. Give the(Learning Outcomes) characteristics of the se plays as well as folk plays ,liturgy and other paradramatic activities. Their staging and acting. Establish their relations with literary works and oral activities such as preaching. Comment on the staging and handling of the plot. Compare and contrast the staging and acting of medieval plays and the interludes and comment on various developments leading to Elisabethian drama.Recommended Happe, Peter.(1999) English Drama Before Shakespeare. NewReading(s) York & London :Longman Beadele, Richard.(1994) The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Theatre. Cambridge:UP. Goodman, Jennifer. (1990) British Drama Before 1660.Teaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with audio visual material, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, project and /or research 10% ,2 formal papers
  • 20% ,final 50 % PMedium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 760 Shakespeare’s ComediesType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • A definition (Aristotelian, and modern) of comedy; the classical origins and types of comedy; • The influence of classical comedy on the Renaissance understanding of comedy as a dramatic form; • The idea and uses of comedy in Renaissance English literature and its influence on Shakespeare; • Shakespeare’s idea and practice of comedy, and the distinctive characteristics of his comedies in general; • A close study of, at least, 5 Shakespearean comedies textually and with reference to modern critical studies.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to acquire a working knowledge of comedy as a literary genre, recognize the(Learning Outcomes) development of comedy from its classical origins to the Renaissance, become familiar with the idea and practice of comedy in Renaissance English literature, understand Shakespeare’s idea and use of comedy and his contributions, thereof, to the development of comedy, enhance their critical and exegetical skills through a close textual and critical study of, at least, 5 Shakespearean comedies.Recommended Martz, William J. Shakespeare’s Universe of Comedy. NewReading(s) York: D. Lewis, 1971. Felperin, Howard. Shakespearean Romance. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1972.
  • Richmond, Hugh M. Shakespeare’s Sexual Comedy: A Mirror for Lovers. Indianapolis: Bobbs Merril, 1971. Berry, Ralph. Shakespeare’s Comedies: Explorations in Form. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1972. Lerner, Laurence, ed. Shakespeare’s Comedies: An Anthology of Modern Criticism. Harmondsworth, Eng.: Penguin, 1967. Gordon, George S. Shakespearean Comedy and Other Studies. London: Oxford UP, 1965. Charlton, Henry Buckley. Shakespearean Comedy. London: Methuen, 1967.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and comprehensively research- based student presentations (minimum 3).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 762 Shakespeare’s History PlaysType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • At the outset, an historical account is given of the social, political, cultural and international aspects of the period from the 1580s to the 1590s as a background of Shakespeare’s writing of history plays; • Reference is made to the historiographical sources of the time that provided Shakespeare with material and ideas; • Focus is put on the political, social, governmental, and judicial matters that Shakespeare problematizes in his history plays; • All this is followed by a close textual and critical study of Shakespeare’s 10 history plays within the context outlined above.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, the students will be able to acquire full familiarity with the social, political, international, and(Learning Outcomes) cultural aspects of the 1580 and 1590s and understand the impact of this period on Shakespeare’s writing of history plays, understand Shakespeare’s use of historiographical sources, recognize the thematic, typological, stylistic and structural qualities of Shakespeare’s 10 historical plays and appreciate them by developing a critical sense and with reference to the political, social, governmental, international and cultural circumstances of the time.
  • Recommended Berry, Edward I. Patterns of Decay: Shakespeare’s EarlyReading(s) Histories. Charlotteville: UP of Virginia, 1975. Blanpied, John W. Time and the Artist in Shakespeare’s English Histories. Newark: U of Delaware P, 1983. Calderwood, James L. Metadrama in Shakespeare’s Henriad: Richard II to Henry V. Berkeley and Los Angeles: U of California P, 1979. Campbell, Lily B. Shakespeare’s “Histories”: Mirrors of Elizabethan Policy. San Marino, CA: Huntington Library, 1978. Champion, Larry S. “The Noise of Threatening Drum”: Dramatic Strategy and Political Ideology in Shakespeare and the English Chronicle Plays. Newark: U of Delaware P, and London: Associated UPs, 1990. Dollimore, Jonathan and Alan Sinfield, eds. Political Shakespeare: Essays in Cultural Materialism. 2nd ed. 1985. Manchester: Manchester UP, 1994.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and comprehensively research- based student presentations (minimum 3).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 764 Shakespeare’s Problem PlaysType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • At the outset, Shakespeare’s “problem” plays and their intrinsic qualities are identified, following a conceptual and critical discussion of the term “problem plays”; • Moreover, by way of a foregrounding, the theoretical and critical but often contradictory and controversial approaches made by modern critics to Shakespeare’s problem plays are reviewed and assessed through a metacritical perspective; • This is followed by an in-depth study of the “problem” plays, commonly identified as Troilus and Cressida (1602), All’s Well That Ends Well (1603), and Measure for Measure (1604); • Also in this study are included Julius Caesar (1599), Hamlet (1601), Anthony and Cleopatra (1607), and Timon of Athens (1607), which have been categorized by some critics as the other problem plays.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, the students will be able to acquire familiarity with those plays by Shakespeare that have been(Learning Outcomes) categorized by modern critics as “problem plays,” have a critical understanding of the modern views about them and make their own criticial assessments; they can formulate their own critical views on Shakespeare’s “problem plays” by making a close textual and critical study of these plays, based on a comprehensive research and comparative analysis, identify the
  • moral, judicial, social, cultural, and conceptual problems embedded in the plays, and, thus, develop their own critical and scholarly skills.Recommended Ure, Peter. Shakespeare: The Problem Plays. 3rd ed. London:Reading(s) Longman, 1970. Shanzer, Ernest. The Problem Plays of Shakespeare: A Study of ‘Julius Caesar,’ ‘Measure for Measure,’ ‘Antony and Cleopatra.’ London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1963. Lawrence, W.W. Shakespeare’s Problem Comedies. 3rd ed. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1969. Tillyard, E.M.W. Shakespeare’s Problem Plays. London: Chatto and Windus, 1950. Thomas, Vivian. The Moral Universe of Shakespeare’s Problem Plays. London and Sydney: Croom Helm, 1987. Hillman, Richard. William Shakespeare: The Problem Plays. New York: Twayne, 1993.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and comprehensively research- based student presentations (minimum 3).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 766 Renaissance English LiteratureType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 4 0 4ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 theoric, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • European Renaissance and the rise and development of Humanism, • The influences of Petrarchism, Neo-Platonism and Reformation on Renaissance thought, • Historical, cultural, political condition in Renaissance England, • The study of representative poets of the Renaissance English literature and their works (excluding Spenser and drama), • The rise and development of sonnet tradition, sonnets by Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Shakespeare and Lady Mary Wroth, • The study of prose works by Ascham, Puttenham, Sidney, • The study of other literary genres, epic, pastoral and Ovidian/mythological poetry.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise European Renaissance and the rise and development of(Learning Outcomes) Humanism. They will be able to recognise its influences on England and Renaissance English Literature (excluding drama). They will be able to evaluate the effects of historical, cultural, political changes on literature and to illustrate this knowledge through a study of the texts representative of the literary achievements of the age.Recommended Greenblatt, Stephen Jay ed. (1988) Representing the EnglishReading(s) Renaissance, Berkely: U of California Press.
  • Hay, Jeff ed. (2002) The Renaissance, San Diego: Greenhaven. Kristeller, Paul Oskar (1980) Renaissance Thought and the Arts : Collected Essays, Princeton:Princeton UP. Malcolmson, Christina ed. and int. (1998) Renaissance Poetry, Essex:Longman.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 3 formal presentations (30%), 1 mid-term exam (20%), class participation (20%) and final exam (30%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 769 MiltonType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • At the outset, in order to form a framework of reference and identify the circumstances which had a constructive impact on Milton’s literary and political ideas, a full account is given of the social, political, cultural, and literary changes and developments that came to the fore in the transition from the Elizabethan to the Stuart period; • An historical overview of the political, social, judicial, cultural, governmental and monarchic circumstances of the period from the accession of James I to the Restoration, with particular emphasis on the policies of James I, Charles I, and Cromwell, is presented; • Moreover, the literary developments of the period are extensively dwelt on; • The, in the context of all these preliminary accounts and studies, Milton’s literary development, sources of ideas and concepts, dependence upon the classical and humanistic tradition, and contribution to English literature are studied in depth and discussed theoretically, critically, and historically; • Along these studies and discussions, his early poetry, political and polemical writings, and major works Samson Agonistes, Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained are studied in depth and critically.
  • Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to establish literary, historical, political, social and cultural relationship and(Learning Outcomes) fully recognize the distinctive characteristics of the Stuart period; they will be fully familiar with the developments in this period and have a framework of reference to read and appreciate Milton intelligently. They can then situate Milton not only in the social, political and cultural context of the period but also in the Renaissance literary tradition as well as in the literary setting of his own time. They can also have a full and in-depth knowledge of all of Milton’s works, discuss and interpret them through a critical approach and, thus, develop their own skills of criticism and scholarship.Recommended Parry, Graham. The Seventeenth Century: The Intellectual andReading(s) Cultural Context of English Literature, 1603-1700. London: Longman, 1989. MacCallum, Hugh. Milton and The Sons of God: The Divine Image in Milton’s Epic Poetry. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1986. Featheringill, Ron. The Tension between Divine Will and Human Free Will in Milton and the Classical Epic Tradition. New York: P. Lang, 1990. Loewenstein, David. Milton and the Drama of History: Historical Vision, Iconoclasm, and the Literary Imagination. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1990. Pavlock, Barbara. Eros, Imıtation, and the Epic Tradition. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1990. Martindale, Charles. John Milton and the Transformation of Ancient Epic. London: Croom Helm, 1986.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and comprehensively research- based student presentations (minimum 3).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 773 18. Century English NovelType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • The analysis of socio-political changes and literary innovations in 18th century England. • Besides Richardson, Fielding and Defoe, the analysis of the works of Margaret Cavendish, Delariviere Manley and Aphra Behn who contributed in the development of the genre in the 17th century. • The appraisal of the works of Elizabeth Inchbald, Charlotte Lennox, Charlotte Smith, Fanny Burney, Maria Edgeworth, Amelia Opie, M. Brunton, Sarah Fielding, Mary Wollstonecraft who contributed in the development of the novel as a popular genre employing feministic themes. • The analysis of Lady Morgan in the birth of political novel and of Mary Hays in autobiographical novel and Ann Radcliffe in the gothic novel.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ... • define the social and political situation in 17th and 18th(Learning Outcomes) century England, • observe in the early examples the birth and the development of the genre, • Analyse not only the works of wellknown novelists such as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smolett and Sterne, but also differentiate the works of the women novelists who contributed in the birth and development of the novel from the works of the male writers. • Understand the thematic and technical variations in various new examples of the genre.Recommended • Ballaster, Ros (1992) Seductive Forms: Women’sReading(s)
  • Amatory Fiction from 1684 to 1740, Oxford: Clarendon. • Craft-Fairchild, Catherine (1993) Masquerade and Gender: Disguise and Female Identity in Eighteenth Century Fictions by Women, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State UP. • Figes, Eva (1982) Sex and Subterfuge: Women Writers to 1850, London: Macmillan. • Rogers, Katharine M. and William McCarthy eds. (1987) The Meridian Anthology of Early Women Writers, Middlesex: Penguin. • Spender, Dale (1986) Mothers of the Novel, London: Pandora. • Spender, Dale ed. (1992) Living by the Pen: Early British Women Writers, New York: Teacher’s College. • Spender, Dale ed. (1992) Living by the Pen: Early British Women Writers, New York: Teacher’s College. • Turner, Cheryl (1992) Living by the Pen: Women Writers in the 18th Century. London:Routledge.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions, individual and group worksAssessment Method(s) Midterm I 20%, Midterm II 20%, presentations 20%, Final Exam 40%Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 781 Victorian PoetryType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 4 0 4ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 theoric, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • History, culture and literature of the the 19th century, and the study the literary works that belong to the period: • Poets and the poetic tradition during the Victorian period: poems of A.Tennyson, Robert Browning, M.Arnold, • Prose works during the Victorian period:prose works by T.Carlyle, J.Ruskin ve J.S. Mill, M.Arnold, • Pre-Raphalelite movement, poems of D.G.Rossetti and A.C.Swinburne, • Victorian women poets: poems of L.E.Landon, F.Hemans, E.B.Browning and C.Rossetti.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise the history, culture and literature of the the 19th(Learning Outcomes) century. They will also be acquainted with major literary genres and conventions of the Victorian period. Their research and argumentation skills will be enhanced through a study and analysis of the works by the represantative writers of the period.RecommendedReading(s) Armstrong, Isobel. (1993). Victorian Poetry: Poetry, Poetics and Politics, London: Routledge. Harrison, Antony H. (1998). Victorian Poets and the Politics of Culture : Discourse and Ideology, Charlottesville : University Press of Virginia. Christ, Carol T. et al., eds. (1995). Victorian Literature
  • and the Victorian Visual Imagination, Berkeley : University of California Press.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 3 formal presentations (30%), 1 mid-term exam (20%), class participation (20%) and final exam (30%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 783 20th Century English PoetryType of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Associate Prof. Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours in total)Course Contents • Transition from the 19th century to the twentieth century, the shift in the understanding of poetry • Poetry Of The First Quarter Of The Twentieth Century, Georgians, the war poets and Thomas Hardy • Modernism, T. S. Eliot and the modernist poets • The poetry of Yeats and D. H. Lawrence • Political poetry of the 1930s, the Auden generation • Neo-romantic poetry of the 1940s, Dylan Thomas.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to examine the major developments in the twentieth century(Learning Outcomes) English poetry, to analyse the contributions of modernism and the changes it makes in poetry, to examine in a comparative context the influence of modernism on the poetry of the 1930s and the 1940s, to recognise and apply the knowledge of poetic developments in reading poems of the twentieth century English poets.RecommendedReading(s) Childs, Peter. (1999). The Twentieth Century in Poetry: A Critical Survey. Routledge. Featherstone, Simon. (1995). War Poetry: An Introductory Reader. Routledge. Perkins, David. (1987). A History of Modern Poetry:
  • Modernism and After. Harvard: Belknap. Other relevant books and articlesTeaching Method(s) Lecture, presentations, discussion and analysis of poems.Assessment Method(s) Two presentations (20 %+25 %) Contribution and class participation (30 %), final (25 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 784 20. Century English Novel (till 1950s)Type of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • The analysis of the philosophical, social and scientific changes and theories in the first half of the 20th century and their impact on the modernist novel, • The analysis of the ideas and innovations of the writers and philosophers such as Bergson, Jung, Freud, W. James, Woolf and Joyce. • The definiton of the Modernist elements of the novels chosen for the course, • The analysis of the experimental techniques in the novels of the significant novelists such as James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, E.M. Forster, Ford Madox Ford and George Orwell, • The stylistic and thematic features of the novelists in the 1930s and 1050s, who attampted to revive realistic features in the novel genre. • The novels chosen for the course: Conrad The Nigger of Narcissus ve Lord Jim, Ford The Good Soldier and Parade’s End, D.H. Lawrence Lady Chatterley’s Lover and Rainbow, Woolf Three Guineas and The Waves, Joyce Ulysses and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Beckett Trilogy, Waugh A Handful of Dust, Orwell Animal Farm and 1984.Objective of the Course At the end of the course, the students will be able to, • Classify and define the innovative philosophies and ideas(Learning Outcomes) of Bergson, Jung, Freud, W. James, Woolf and Joyce who lived in the first half the 20th century, • Observe technical and thematic changes in the novels chosen for the course as modernist examples of the novel genre and they are able to analyze and explain the
  • modernist elements of the novels.Recommended Bradbury, Malcolm. (1993) The Modern British Novel. London:Reading(s) Penguin. Waugh, Patricia. (1992) Practicing Postmodernism, reading Modernism. London:Edward Arnold. Ellman, Richard and Charles Fiedelson (eds.) (1965) The Modern Tradition. London: Penguin. Childs, Peter.(2000) Modernism. London: Routledge.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions, individual and group worksAssessment Method(s) Midterm I 20%, Midterm II 20%, presentations 20%, Final Exam %40Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 785 English War PoetsType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 4 0 4ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Assist.Prof.Dr.Hande SadunPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 theoric, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • War as a topic in literature, • The causes and characteristics of World War I, Britain’s social and political attitude towards the war, critical controversies about English war poetry, • The leading World War I poets and their poems: Rupert Brooke, Julian Grenfell, Charles H. Sorley, Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, Robert Graves, Edmund C. Blunden, Edward Thomas, Ivor Gurney, Isaac Rosenberg, David Jones, Herbert Read, Robert Nichols, F.W. Harvey, Arthur G. West, • The women poets and their poems: Vera Brittain, Jessie Pope ve Winifred Letts, • The World War II poets and their poems: Elizabeth Jennings, Keith Douglas, Hamish Henderson, John Wedge, Charles Robinson and Henry Reed, the. • Poets who have written about the Falkland War: David Morgan, R.J. Latham.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to recognise “English war poetry,” which holds a special place in(Learning Outcomes) 20th-century English poetry in view of the poets’ representation of war through variant feelings and thoughts by relying upon their own individual observations and experiences of a war environment.Moreover, through a study of the poems on World War II and on Falkland War, the students will be able to understand and appreciate the special importance that war poetry has within 20th-century English poetry. Their research and argumentation skills will be enhanced through a further study of the social, political and cultural aspects.
  • Recommended Banarjee, A. (1976). Spirit above Wars: A Study of theReading(s) English Poetry of the Two World Wars, London: Macmillan. Crawford, F. D. (1988). British Poets of the Great War, Selinsgrove: Susquehanna UP. Johnston, John H. (1964). English Poetry of the First World War: A Study in the Evolution of Lyric and Narrative Form, Princeton: Princeton UP.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, discussion, presentationAssessment Method(s) 3 formal presentations (30%), 1 mid-term exam (20%), class participation (20%) and final exam (30%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 790 Contemporary British PoetryType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Associate Prof Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours a week in total)Course Contents • Poetic movements and poets in the second half of the twentieth century in Britain • The mid-century poetry, Movement poets • Developments in British poetry in the 1970s • Contemporary British poetry, the poetry of the 1980s and onwards. • Postmodern poetry and political social poetry of tthe contemporary period. • Plurality in contemporary British poetryObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to explain modernism and its place in British poetry, to(Learning Outcomes) examine the developments and changes in British poetry after the 1950s and the movement poetry, to analyse and compare the contribution of Ted Hughes and Seamus Heaney to British poetry, to analyse contemporary British poets and the changes they introduce to poetry, to recognise the postmodern, social political contemporary British poetry and its plurality.RecommendedReading(s) Allnutt, Gillian. (1988). The New British poetry, 1968-88. London:Grafton Boks. Day, Gary. (1997). British poetry from the 1950s to the 1990s : politics and art. London:Macmillan. Parker, Jonathan. (1995). Poetry in Britain and Ireland since 1970. London: British Council.
  • Other relevant books and articlesTeaching Method(s) Lecture, analysis, discussion, comparison and presentationAssessment Method(s) Two papers/presentations( 20 %+25 %), Class participation and contribution (30 %), Final (25 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 791 English Theatre from the 1950s to the PresentType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • Postwar English dramatists and their representative plays • Dramatic movements of the period • Themes dealt with in the plays • Forms and techniques used in the plays • Application of relevant literary theory in analysing the plays • Thematic and technical contributions made by the playwrights to the drama of the periodObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Develop play- reading strategies, analyse plays with reference to form and content, interpret plays extensively, recognise the peculiarities of the dramatic movements, compare the styles of the dramatists, compare and evaluate the contributions made by the playwrights to drama and to develop an aesthetic awareness of English drama form the 1950s to the present.
  • RecommendedReading(s) Guralnick, E.S. (1996). S Sight Unseen: Beckett, Pinter, Stoppard and other Contemporary Dramatists. Ohio: Ohio U P. K. Berney, K.A. (1994). Contemporary British Dramatists. London: St. James Press. Zeifman, H. (1993). Contemporary British Drama 1970-1990. London: Macmillan.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 4 presentation/term-papers (30%), 3 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IED 793 Contemporary British NovelType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • The literary movements and social changes in the 1950s, • Social, cultural and political changes in the 1960s, • The literary movements and social changes in the 1970s, • Postmodern literary theories, • Cultural changes and the social structure of the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, the debate between the History and the novel genre, fabulation, metafiction, historiographic metafictionmultiplicity, postmodern parody, postmodern conceptualisation of character and author • Novels:1950s: Kingsley Amis. Lucky Jim, Malcolm Bradbury. Eating People Is Wrong, Graham Greene. The End of the Affair; 1970s till present: John Banville. Dr. Copernicus, Julian Barnes. Flauberts Parrot, John Fowles. Daniel Martin, A Maggot, William Golding. Paper Men, D.M. Thomas, Lying Together, Graham Swift. Waterland, Peter Ackroyd. Hawksmoor, The Trial of Elizabeth Cree, Penelope Lively. Cleopatras Sister, Penelope Fitzgerald. The Blue Flower, Jeanette Winterson. Boating For Beginners, The Gut Symmetries, Jim Crace. The Gift of Stones, Patricia Duncker. Hallucinating Foucault, Derek Beaven. Newtons Niece, Ben Okri. Astonishing the Gods,Robert Irwin. The Arabian NightmareObjective of the Course At the end of the semestre, the students will be able to, • Classify and differentiate the postmodern concepts,(Learning Outcomes) movements and cultural changes from those that took place earlier in the century, • Define the postmodern features of the novel, • Analyse and appreciate the postmodern novels from the
  • perspective of postmodern theories and movements.Recommended Hutcheon, L. (1989) The Poetics of Postmodernism. London:Reading(s) Routledge. ---, (1990) The Politics of Postmodernism. London: Routledge Waugh, P. (1984) Metafiction. London: Methuen Lee, A. (1990) Realism and Power: Postmodern British Fiction. London: Routledge.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions, individual and group worksAssessment Method(s) Midterm I 20%, Midterm II 20%, presentations %20, Final Exam 40%Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İED 794 POPULAR LITERATUREType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents The study of popılar literature genres such as science fiction,fantasy, horror annd detective stories. • Tolkein Hobbit, Wells Time Machine, Verne Journey to the Moon, R Graves I Cladius, Rowling Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, Lewis Chronicles of Narnia, Baigent& Leigh Holy Blood Holy Grail.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the student will be able to identify The various genre of popular literature,summarise their(Learning Outcomes) characteristics,compare and contrast works with each other and with works of the cannon and evaluate them.Recommended . Cawelti,John.(1976) Adventure, Mystery, Romance. UPReading(s) Chicago. Herbert,Rosemary,ed.(1999) The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery. Oxford:UP.Teaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with audio visual material, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, project and /or research 10% ,2 formal papers 20% ,final 50 % PMedium of Instruction English
  • 7.2. British Cultural StudiesGRADUATE COURSES ECTS 1. IKA 601 Introduction to British Cultural Studies 8 2. IKA 602 Society and the Individual in Britain 8 3. IKA 603 British History and Politics 8 4. IKA 604 Nationality and National Identities in Britain 8 5. IKA 605 Multiculturalism 8 6. IKA 606 Women’s Studies 8 7. IKA 607 Introduction to Media Studies 8 8. IKA 608 Language, Culture and Society in Britain 8 9. IKA 610 Culture and Literature in Britain 8 10. IKA 613 Cinema and Culture in Britain 8 11. IKA 615 British Colonial Culture and Literature 8 12. IKA 616 Postcolonial British Literature and Culture 8 13. IKA 701 Literature, Politics and Culture in Britain 10 14. IKA 705 Class and Gender 10 15. IKA 706 British Postcolonial Literature 10 16. IKA 708 Contemporary British Politics and Economy 10 17. IKA 710 Cultural Theory and Criticism 10 18. IKA 712 Comparative Literatures and Cultures 10 19. IKA 715 British Colonial Culture and Literature 10 20. IKA 718 Culture and Environment in Britain 10
  • 21.7.2.1. Masters in British Cultural StudiesCourse Code and Title IKA 601 Introduction to British Cultural StudiesType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Associate Prof Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours a week in total)Course Contents • Definition and history of British Cultural Studies • Definition(s) of culture, high culture, popular culture • Major principles,terms, theories and interests of British Cultural Studies • Representation and discourse and ideology • Relationship between culture, discourse, hegemony and ideology • Consumer culture and the media • Multiculturalism • PostcolonialismObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to define and explain the development of British Cultural Studies,. They(Learning Outcomes) identify the place of British Cultural Studies in cultural studies and explain its main principles. They define ideology, discourse, representation and apply the theories of these in visual and written texts and contexts. They analyse and criticise cultural representations in given texts and develop a critical and analytical approach.Recommended Turner, Graeme. (1990). British Cultural Studies: AnReading(s) Introduction. Boston: Unwin Hyman. During, Simon. (1989).A Cultural Studies Reader. London:
  • Routledge. Barker, Chris. (2000) Cultural Studies: Theory and Practice. London: Sage Publications.Teaching Method(s) Lecture, presentation, textual analysis and discussion.Assessment Method(s) Contribution and class participation (25 %), presentations/papers (50 %), final exam/research paper (25 % )Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 602 Society and the Individual in BritainType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Associate Prof Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours a week in total)Course Contents • Social structure and institutions in contemporary Britain • Relationship between society and the individual in contemporary Britain • The individual and gender, the individual and social class, the individual and education, the individual and the state, the individual and work in contemporary Britain. • Development of the individual’s relationship with the world and the society • Britain’s multicultural, multi-racial and multinational structure and the individual • British culture and the individual • Representations of British society and culture and the individual in the media and literatureObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to examine the social structure of contemporary British society,(Learning Outcomes) to examine the relevant texts in this context, to analyse the institutional and political system in Britain and its relation to the individual, to analyse the representations of the relationship between the individual and contemporary British society in relation to gender, education,class etc. in the media and literature.Recommended Abercrombie, Nicholas and Alan Warde,. (2000). ContemporaryReading(s) British Society: a new introduction to sociology. Oxford: Polity
  • Pres. Abercrombie, Nicholas. (2001). Contemporary British Society: Reader. Cambridge:Polity Press. Crick, Bernard R. (1991). National identities : the constitution of the United Kingdom. Oxford: Blackwell PublishersTeaching Method(s) Lecture, presentations (papers), analysis and discussion of visual and written material.Assessment Method(s) Two papers ( 50 %),Contribution and class participation (20 %), Final (30 %).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İKA 603 British History and PoliticsType of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Assist. Prof. Dr. Şebnem KayaPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 theoretical, 3 hours per week)Course Contents • Britain as a multi-national state • The British monarchy • The constitution • Parliament • The cabinet and the government • The political parties and the electoral system • Local administrations • The law courts and the judicial system • The law enforcement system • The Church of EnglandObjective of the Course At the end of the semester, students will be able to • conduct scholarly research in the fields of British history(Learning Outcomes) and politics; • look at British history and politics from the point of view of institutional development; • explain the origins, historical evolution and functions of these institutions; • approach British history and politics from a critical point of view; • discuss British history and politics.Recommended Moran, Michael. Politics and Society: An Introduction. London:Reading(s) Macmillan, 1989. Geldart, William. Introduction to English Law. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1991.
  • Smith, Malcolm. British Plolitics, Society and the State since the Late Nineteenth Century. London: Macmillan, 1990.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentations and in-class discussionsAssessment Method(s) 2 formal papers (40 %), participation in class discussions (20 %), final examination (40 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 604 Nationality and national Identities in BritainType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Associate Prof Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semester (4 hours theoretical, 4 hours a week in total)Course Contents • Definiton(s) of national identity • British and English national identity • Scottish national identity and its development • Irish national Identity and its development • Welsh national identity and its development • The relationship between national identity and social class, gender and religion in contemporary BritainObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to understand the definition of national identity and the national(Learning Outcomes) identity theories, to recognise the multiplicity of national identities in Britain, to recognise the difference between Britishness and Englishness, to examine the Scottish, Irish and Welsh national identities and their historical development, to analyse the relationship between national identity and religion, social class, gender and politics in contemporary Britain.RecommendedReading(s) Crick, Bernard. Ed. (1991). National Identities. The Constitution of the United Kingdom. Blackwell. Miller, David. (1995). On Nationality. Oxford: Clarendon Press. Other relevant books and articles.
  • Teaching Method(s) Lecture, presentations, discussion and analysis of texts.Assessment Method(s) Two presentations (25 %+ 25 %), class participation (25 %), Final (25 %).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 605 MulticulturalismType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Yrd. Doç. Dr. Aytül ÖzümPre-requisite(s) _Semester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours a week)Course Contents • This course is mainly concerned with the transformation of Britain from a mainly white society into a multicultural society through the influx of immigrants chiefly from the former colonies, and the effect that this transformation has had on the indigenous white population. • The course deals with different theories of multiculturalism about the issues of class, race, ethnicity, religion and continental and analytical feminism. • With each of these theoretical perspectives, paradigmatic examples and generalizations are foregrounded. • The course highlights the progressive change that each minority group, such as Asian, Afro-Carrebian, African, and West Indian, displays within the frame of certain cultural terms such as culture, indigenous culture, subculture, nationality, race, ethnicity, religion, identity, hybridity, hyphenated identity, difference, diversity, assimilation, integration, acculturation, transculturation, melting pot, cultural mosaics plurality and multiculturalism. çokkültürlülük gibi terimlerin çerçevesinde inceler.Objective of the Course At the end of this course, the students will be able to • Define multiculturalism in England and exemplify it in a(Learning Outcomes) variety of situations. • Explain multiculturalism as a concept and a cultural theory in its historical development by referring to the social, political and literary examples in the 20th and 21th centuries.Recommended • Modood, Tariq. (1992) Not Easy Being British: Colour,
  • Reading(s) Culture and Citizenship. Stoke-on-Trent: Runnymede Trust. • -----. (1997) The Politics of Multiculturalism in the New Europe: Racism, Identity and Community. New York: Zed. • Modood, Tariq. (1997) Ethnic Minorities in Britain:Diversity and Disadvantage. London: Policy Studies Institute. • Amirthanayagam, Guy. (2000) The Marriage of Continenets: Multiculturalism in Modern Literature. University Press of America: Lanham, Md. • Angus, Ian H. (1997) A Border Within: National Identity, Cultural Plurality, and Wilderness. McGill- Queen’s University Press: Montreal. • Baumann, Gerd. (1998) The Multicultural Riddle: Rethinking National, Ethnic, and Religious. Routledge, New York. • Bennett, David. (1999) Multicultural States: Rethinking Difference and Identity. Routledge: London. • Clarck, Gordon, ed. (1993) Multiculturalism, Difference and Postmodernism. Melbourne: Longman Uheshire.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, discussions, individual and group worksAssessment Method(s) Midterm I 20%, Midterm II 20%, presentations 20%, Final Exam 40%Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 606 Women’s StudiesType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • Women’s status in England with reference to the socio- economic and political background form the Renaissance to the present • Women’s rights in different periods • Illustrations of women’s status in fiction and drama • Illustrations of women’s status in non-literary media such as women’s magazines, men’s magazines, TV, anecdotes, cartoons, etc. • Feminisms and Feminist theoryObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Recognise and interpret reflections of women’s status in English literary and non-literary media, analyse differences with regard to specific periods, assess the changing status of women over the ages, apply Feminist theory to texts.RecommendedReading(s) Wandor, M. (1983). On Gender and Writing. London: Pandora Press.
  • Philips, D. (1998). Brave New Causes: Women in British Postwar Fictions. London: Leicester U P. Bryson, V. (1999). Feminist Debates: Issues of Theory and Political Practice. London: Macmillan.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 3 presentation/term-papers (30%), 2 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Dersin Kodu ve Adı İED 607 INTODUCTION TO MEDIA STUDIESType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents • Introduction to various types of Media in Britain and Turkey,TV, Newspapers and Magazines, Radio, their policies and ideologies. News and Advertisement production policies. Sensure and control mechanisms.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the student will be able to summarise various types of media:news papers, magazines, TV and Radio(Learning Outcomes) channels. Comment on their policies and ideologies . Compare and contrast various mediums and these mediums in Turkey and Britain. Comment on sensure and control policies and evaluate newsmaking and advertisements.Recommended Collins,Richard.( ) Media, Culture and Society.Reading(s) Du Gay, Paul,ed.( ) Production of Culture/Culture of Production. Ciler,Dursun. TV Haberlerinde İdeolojiTeaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with audio visual material, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, project and /or research 10% ,2 formal papers 20% ,final 50 % MMedium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 608 Language, Culture and Society in BritainType of Course Elective(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Dr.Alev BAYSALPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (3 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents .Making meaning, representing things .Key concepts: culture, popular culture, social classes, language, gender etc .Language and representative theories . Mimetic theories of representation .Contemporary British Society .Post-war British Society .Multi-ethnic Society .Changes in Family Life . Irish, Welsh and Scottish QuestionObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to acquire a broad and in-depth familiarity with the idea of(Learning Outcomes) “language”, “culture” and “society” in post-war Britain with social emphasis on dialects, accents, social life, ethnicity, race, gender and class. Thus, students will be able to develop their critical skills and use them efficiently.RecommendedReading(s) BARKER, Chris. Cultural Studies: Theory and Practice. London:Oxford, 2003 SMITH, Philip. Cultural Theory. London: Oxford,2001 STORRY, Mike (ed) . British Cultural Identities. New York:Routledge, 2002.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and research-based student presentations.Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 and %20), final
  • examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 610 Culture and Literature in BritainType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • 20th century English low culture, popular culture, ethnic culture,multiculturalism, colonial and postcolonial culture • Relevant cultural theory • Illustrations of the above-mentioned topics in fiction and dramaObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Recognise the peculiarities of a variety of cultures in England, relate relevant cultural theory, observe and illustrate the reflections of culture in literary work, compare and interpret aspects and practices of different cultures.RecommendedReading(s) Bloom, C. (1993). Literature and Culture in Modern Britain. London: Longman. Milner, A. (1996). Literature, Culture and Society. London: UCL Press. Mudrick, M. (1970). On Culture and Literature. Pittsburgh: Horizon Press.
  • Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 3 presentation/term-papers (30%), 2 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Dersin Kodu ve Adı İED 613 CINEMA AND CULTURE IN BRITAINType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents This course is a close study of British films from different periods as representations of British culture and society. Special emphasis will be put on the adaptations of British literary texts. The course also includes a comparison and contrast in terms of text scripts and the works of some of the major writers in English literature which have been adapted for the cinema.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the student will be able to summarise various types of media:news papers, magazines, TV and Radio(Learning Outcomes) channels. Comment on their policies and ideologies . Compare and contrast various mediums and these mediums in Turkey and Britain. Comment on sensure and control policies and evaluate newsmaking and advertisements.Recommended Collins,Richard.( ) Media, Culture and Society.Reading(s) Du Gay, Paul,ed.( ) Production of Culture/Culture of Production. Ciler,Dursun. TV Haberlerinde İdeolojiTeaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with audio visual material, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, project and /or research 10% ,2 formal papers 20% ,final 50 % MMedium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 615 BRITISH COLONIAL CULTURE AND LITERATUREType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • History of British colonialism • British imperialism • Education, language, social and cultural problems in British colonies • The impact of colonialism on indigenous environments • Representations of colonialism in British literature • Key colonialist conceptsObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to, recognize British colonies from the 17th to the 20th century,(Learning Outcomes) analyze the social and cultural effects of colonization on indigeneous cultures, interpret the ideological and literary dimensions of British imperialism, and define and interpret them in selected literary texts, and explain key concepts related to the process of colonial expansion of Britian.Recommended Dirks, Nicholas B. Ed. (1995). Colonialism and Culture,Reading(s) Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press. Thomas, Nicholas. (1994). Colonialism’s Culture: Anthropology, Travel and Government, Princeton, N.J.: princeton University Press. Memmi, Albert. (1967). The Colonizer and the Colonized, Boston: Beacon Press.Teaching Method(s) Interactive: introduction,discussion, student presentationsAssessment Method(s) 2 term Papers (%45), short review essays (%15) and Final Exam (%40)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 616 POSTCOLONIAL BRITISH CULTURE AND LITERATUREType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 8Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • Introduction to Postcolonial Theory • Key concepts in Colonialism and Postcolonialism • Political and social developments in former British colonies • Neocolonialism, and orientalism • Cultural imperialism and ideological dimensions • Identity, language, gender issues in postcolonial literatureObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to, identify postcolonial literaures and cultures, recognize the socio-(Learning Outcomes) cultural dimensions of neocolonialism and cultural imperialism, interpret postcolonial texts on the effects of British imperialism, and define key concepts related to postcolonial theory and practice.Recommended Ashcroft, Bill, et al., Eds. (1989). The Empire Writes Back:Reading(s) Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literatures, London: Routledge. Tiffin, Chris and Alan Lawson.( 1994). De-scribing Empire: Post-colonialism and Textuality. London: Routledge. Mongia, P., Ed.(1996). Contemporary Postcolonial Theory, London: ArnoldTeaching Method(s) Interactive: introduction,discussion, student presentationsAssessment Method(s) 2 term Papers (%45), short review essays (%15) and Final Exam (%40)Medium of Instruction English
  • 7.2.2. PhD in British Cultural StudiesCourse Code and Title IKA 701 Literature, Politics and Culture in BritainType of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Associate Prof Dr. Huriye ReisPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 theoretical, 4 hours a week in total)Course Contents • The political and cultural background of the post-war Britain • The relationship between literature, culture and politics • Reflection of political and socio-cultural developments in literature • Class and gender in the literature of the 1950s and 1960s and later. • Reading novel, plays and poetry in relation to culture, literature and politics in a variety of texts from different periods in BritainObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to understand the relationship between culture, literature and(Learning Outcomes) politics, to examine and understand the theories of the relationship between culture and literature, to analyse novels, poetry and plays in the context of the relationship between culture, literature and politics, to apply, in this context, apply his/her knowledge in different contexts, to understand that culture and literature construct each other in a mutually dependent way and contibute to the development of each other.RecommendedReading(s) Abercrombie, Nicholas. (2001). Contemporary British Society: Reader. Cambridge: Polity Press
  • Addison, Paul. (1995) Now the war is Over: A Social History of Britain 1945-1951. London: Pimlico. Sinfield, Alan. (1997). Literature, Politics and Culture in Postwar Britain.London: Athlone Press. Other relevant books and articlesTeaching Method(s) Lectures, presentations, discussion and text analysisAssessment Method(s) Two midterms (25%+ 25%), Class discussions and contributions (25 %), Final exam/paper (25 %)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 705 Class and GenderType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. A. Deniz BozerPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 semestre (4 theoretical, 4 hours/week)Course Contents • Social classes in English society from the 18th century to the present • Gender in English society from the 18th century to the present • Interaction of different genders • Interaction among social classes • Interaction of class and gender in forming identity • Evaluation of issues related to class and gender with regard to the socio-cultural and political background of different ages • Illustrations of class and gender in English fiction and dramaObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to ...(Learning Outcomes) Recognise the peculiarities of different classes and gender in England since the 18th century to the present, observe the interaction of classes and gender in a selection of English novels, short stories and plays, interpret these interactions and evaluate them with reference to their socio-cultural and political background and develop a comparative and critical view point regarding these concepts.
  • RecommendedReading(s) Batlseer, J. (1985). Rewriting English: Cultural Politics of Gender and Class. London: Methuen. Kimmel, M. (2003). The Gendered Society Reader. New York: Oxford U P. Alcoff, L. (2003). Identities: Race, Class, Gender and Nationality. Malden, MA: Blackwell Pub.Teaching Method(s) Lectures, student presentation, discussion, group workAssessment Method(s) 4 presentation/term-papers (30%), 3 oral synopses of secondary sources (10%), participation in class discussion (10%) and a final exam (50%).Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 706 BRITISH POSTCOLONIAL CULTUREType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • Postcolonial Theorists • Orientalism and its social effects • Postcolonial social and political structures • The impact of imperialism on the cultures of former British colonies • Problems of immigration • MulticulturalismObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to, explain the changes in the social structures of nations after(Learning Outcomes) decoloniaztion, recognize their cultures, interpret cultural imperialism in a postcolonial context, and analyze postcolonial theoy.Recommended Childs, Peter and Patrick Williams. (1997). An Introduction toReading(s) Post-Colonial Theory, London: Longman. Moore-Gilbert, Bart. Ed. (1997). Postcolonial Criticism, London: Longman. Ashcroft, Bill, et al. (1998). Key Concepts in Post-Colonial Studies. London: RoutledgeTeaching Method(s) Interactive: introduction,discussion, student presentationsAssessment Method(s) 3 term Papers (%45), short review essays (%15) and Final Exam (%40)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İKA 708 Contemporary British Politics and EconomyType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester 1 Semester (4 hours theoretical/Week)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • At the outset, a comprehensive overview of the social, political, economic and international developments in post-war Britain is given; • The post-war “welfare state” policies, the policies of the Conservatives in power from the early 1950s and their social and economic effects, the Cold War, which was becoming a serious international threat in the 1950s, and its the effects of on the British economy and politics, and the social, political, economic, and international developments in Britain in the 1960s, which was also a period of the Labour government, are studied comprehensively and in a historical perspective; • All this is followed by a close study of the political, economic, social and international developments in Britain in the 1970s, with particular emphasis on the oil crisis, the political activities of the trade unions, and the Conservative-Labour conflicts; • Then, the Thatcher era, beginning in 1979, and the radical economic policies, international developments, and social changes in Britain during this era (privatization, retrenchment of public expenditure, the Falkland crisis and war, statutory and political restrictions imposed on trade union activities, radical measures to control the working life, and so forth) are studied extensively and in depth; • The Britain-EU relations are also focused on • A full review of the social, political, economic, and
  • cultural developments in the post-Thatcherite period and under the Blair governments down to the present constitutes the final chapter of the Course.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, the students will be able to acquire a full perspective of the changing political,(Learning Outcomes) economic, and social circumstances in Britain from the post-war period down to the present Blair administration, become fully familiar with the domestic and international developments during this long period of time, evaluate the effects and outcomes of government changes, Conservative and Labour economic and international policies, know about the impact on politics and the economy of trade union activities and other social groups, and, thus, have a working and critical knowledge of Britain’s contemporary politics and economy.Recommended R.M. Punnet (1987), British Government and PoliticsReading(s) N.F.R. Crafts et al. (ed.), The British Economy Since 1945 Peter Jenkins (1990), Mrs. Thatcher’s Revolution: The Ending of the Socialist Era M. Beloff and G. Peele (1985), The Government of the United Kingdom: Political Authority in A Changing Society H. Drucker et al. (1986), Developments in British Politics B. Jones and D. Kavanagh (1983), British Politics Today Ian Budge et al. (1983; rpt., 1988), The Changing British Political System: Into the 1990s Bill Coxall and Lynton Robins (1989), Contemporary British Politics: An Introduction Alan Ball (1971), Modern Politics and Government Ivan Reid (1989), Social Differences in Britain Frank O’Gorman (1986), British Conservatism Philip Gabriel and Andrew Maslen (1986), British Politics Dennis Kavanagh (1987), Thatcherism and British Politics: The End of Consensus Michael Moran (1985; rpt., 1989) Politics and Society: An Introduction Dennis Kavanagh and Anthony Seldon (ed.; 1989), The Thatcher EffectTeaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and comprehensively research- based student presentations (minimum 3).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İKA 710 Cultural Theory and CriticismType of Course E(Compulsory or Elective)Number of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof.Dr. Himmet UmunçPre-requisite(s) YokSemester/Trimester 1 Yarıyıl (4 saat (kuramsal)/hafta)Course Contents • Introduction: the scope of the Course, essentials and requirements, methodology; • The term “culture” and its sub-categories such as “high culture,” “popular culture,” and/or “mass culture,” are defined, analyzed and discussed theoretically and historically in all aspects; • The dimensions and philosophical essentials of cultural theory and criticism are focused on with reference to contemporary theoreticians; • Then, within this framework of reference are studied, with illustrations from relevant texts, a wide range of cultural concepts and terms such as class, gender, identity, marginality, otherness, stereotyping, subjectivity, alienation, exile, power, politics, colonialism, postcolonialism, mimicry, hegemony, Orientalism, popular culture, and so on.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester, the students will be able to define and discuss the term “culture” and its sub-categories such(Learning Outcomes) as “high culture,” “popular culture,” and/or “mass culture, understand the philosophical and other aspects of cultural theory and criticism, have a critical understanding of the ideas and arguments of contemporary cultural theoreticians, develop their own critical and analytical skills, illustrate the cultural terms and concepts through the use of relevant literary material and texts, and, especially know about in depth such concepts as colonialism, postcolonialism, and Orientalism.
  • Recommended Anthony Giddens et al., eds. Polity Reader in CulturalReading(s) Theory. Cambridge: Polity,1994. Collier, Peter, and Helga Geyer-Ryan. Literary Theory Today. Cambridge: Polity, 1990. During, Simon, ed. The Cultural Studies Reader. 2nd ed. London and New York: Routledge, 1993. Grossberg, Lawrence. Bringing It All back Home: Essays on Cultural Studies. Durham, NC, and London: Duke UP, 1997. LaCapra, Dominick. Soundings in Critical Theory. Ithaca and London: Cornell UP, 1989. Leitch, Vincent B. Cultural Criticism, Literary Theory, Poststructuralism. New York: Columbia UP, 1992. Storey, John, ed. What is Cultural Studies? A Reader. London: Arnold,1996. Said, Edward W.. Orientalism (1979). Said, Edward W., Culture and Imperialism (1993).Teaching Method(s) Lectures, in-class discussions, and comprehensively research- based student presentations (minimum 3).Assessment Method(s) 2 mid-term written examinations (%20 ve %20), final examination (% 20), in-class discussions (% 25), research and presentation (%10), attendance (%05)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title İKA 712 COMPARATIVE LITERATURES AND CULTURESType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of Credits 404AllocatedECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof Dr Burçin ErolPre-requisite(s) -Semester/Trimester 1 semester(4 hours theoretical,4 credits)Course Contents Comparative study of issues of adultery,divorce and slaverey and the rights of the coloured in different cultures and their reflection in literary works. Flaubert Emma Bovary,Tolstoy Anna Karenina, Uşaklıgil Aşk-I Memnu. Samiş Paşazade Sezai Sergüzeşt, Baldwin Blues for Mister Charlie, Langston Hughes, Sonia Sanchez.Objective of the Course At the end of the semester the student will be able to comment on the cultural differences and reactions to adultery, divorce and(Learning Outcomes) slavery in different culture, compare and contrast them and comment on similarities and differences of perception and representation.Recommended Bernheiner, C.(1995) Comparative Literature in the Age ofReading(s) Multiculturalism Marotti, A.F.(1993) Reading with a Difference:Gender Race and Cultural Identity Mudrick, Marvin.(1970) On Culture and LiteratureTeaching Method(s) Lectures illustrated with audio visual material, discussion, individual research and/or projectAssessment Method(s) 2 midterms 20 %, project and /or research 10% ,2 formal papers 20% ,final 50 % PMedium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 715 BRITISH COLONIAL CULTURE AND LITERATUREType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents • History of British colonialism • British imperialism • Education, language, social and cultural problems in British colonies • The impact of colonialism on indigenous environments • Representations of colonialism in British literature • Key colonialist conceptsObjective of the Course At the end of the semester the students will be able to, recognize British colonies from the 17th to the 20th century,(Learning Outcomes) analyze the social and cultural effects of colonization on indigeneous cultures, interpret the ideological and literary dimensions of British imperialism, and define and interpret them in selected literary texts, and explain key concepts related to the process of colonial expansion of Britian.Recommended Dirks, Nicholas B. Ed. (1995). Colonialism and Culture,Reading(s) Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press. Thomas, Nicholas. (1994). Colonialism’s Culture: Anthropology, Travel and Government, Princeton, N.J.: princeton University Press. Memmi, Albert. (1967). The Colonizer and the Colonized, Boston: Beacon Press.Teaching Method(s) Interactive: introduction,discussion, student presentationsAssessment Method(s) 3 term Papers (%45), short review essays (%15) and Final Exam (%40)Medium of Instruction English
  • Course Code and Title IKA 718 CULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT IN BRITAINType of Course(Compulsory or Elective) ENumber of CreditsAllocated 404ECTS Credits 10Name of Lecturer Prof. Dr. SERPİL OPPERMANNPre-requisite(s) NoneSemester/Trimester One SemesterCourse Contents Main contents of the course will include discussing Deep Ecology, ecofeminst approaches, environmentalist ethics, ecological consciousness, nature/culture dualism, anthropocentrism and ecocentrism, ecocritical ideas and texts, ecosophy, past and present cultural interpretations of non-human nature, Western attitudes to the major environmentalist issues, and recent philosophical debates on various environmentalist positions. Emphasis will be put on the enviromental themes in nonfictional essays, novels and poetry to examine how cultural attitudes towards the environment are formed. The methodology of ecocriticism will be used in examining culture-nature relations.Objective of the Course The aim of this course is to explore the contemporary multicultural perspectives in Britain on the issue of how culture(Learning Outcomes) and nature are beneficently and maleficently intertwined through a broad range of ecocritical texts and nature writings which focus on the relationship between human beings, culture and the environment. The course aims at developing an ecologically oriented approach in the intepretation of the discourses of the Humanities and to develop the students ability to critically interpret the environmentalist issues in cultural and literary texts and discourses with high awareness towards possible solutions.Recommended Deep Ecology for the 21st Century (1995)Arne Naess . Ecology,Reading(s) Community and Lifestyle (1989)Peter C. List. Radical Environmentalism (1992)Carolyn Merchant. The Death of Nature (1983)I. G. Simmons. Interpreting Nature: Cultural Constructions of the Environment (1993)Arran E. Gare. Postmodernism and the Environmental Crisis (1995)Cheryll Glotfelty and Harold Fromm (eds). The Ecocriticism Reader
  • (1996)Patrick D. Murphy. Literature, Nature, and Other: Ecofeminist Critiques. (1995)Graeme Turner. British Cultural Studies (1990)Teaching Method(s) Interactive: introduction,discussion, student presentationsAssessment Method(s) 3 term Papers (%45), short review essays (%15) and Final Exam (%40)Medium of Instruction English