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From Tedium to Terrific: Practical, Effective, and Entertaining Ways to Teach Legal Citation
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From Tedium to Terrific: Practical, Effective, and Entertaining Ways to Teach Legal Citation

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by Robert (Bob) Brain, Loyola Law School (Los Angeles), and Selina Farrell, Pepperdine University School of Law …

by Robert (Bob) Brain, Loyola Law School (Los Angeles), and Selina Farrell, Pepperdine University School of Law

Presented at 2010 LWI Conference at Marco Island, FL

Published in Education
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    No notes for slide
  • Does bullet point one only apply to context of single-user, software-driven games versus “live” games presented in group environment?
  • How are you using the word “facile” here? Do you mean “nimble”?
  • Do you want to insert the word “recommend” between “but” and “some”?

Transcript

  • 1. From Tedium to Terrific: Practical, Effective, and Entertaining Ways to Teach Legal Citation Bob Brain, Loyola Law School Los Angeles [email_address] Selina Farrell, Pepperdine School of Law [email_address]
  • 2. REASONS GIVEN FOR TEACHING BY GAMING
    • Students are active participants, not passive listeners
    • Instructor receives feedback as to what’s learned
    • Familiar format
      • Gen. X and Y avg. 10,000 hours of video games before college
    • If teams, there is collaborative learning
      • Gen Y especially favor collaborative learning: in one study, 5% retention by lecture vs. 50% by gaming
      • Professor is moderator vs. instructor; changes hierarchy
    • Breaks routine
    • Almost surely will lead to higher student evaluations
  • 3. REASONS GIVEN FOR TEACHING BY GAMING
    • Fun
    • Students more engaged
      • Body language better
    • More engagement means students more motivated
    • More motivated students make professors more enthusiastic
    • But . . .
    • . . . is there motivation just to play the game, or learn the material? ( Oregon Trail )
    • The Ultimate Question: Do students learn citation better via game play vs. “chalk and talk”?
  • 4. RESEARCH FROM EDUCATION LITERATURE
    • “ Lack of quantifiable metrics to validate use of gaming technology as an effective media for various training solutions has relegated decisions of the same to being ‘leaps of faith.’”
    • Of 63 studies where there was some attempt to measure learning by game play vs. lecture:
      • 38 showed no difference
      • 22 favored game play
      • 3 favored “traditional”
    • Edu-tainment vs. Entertainment
      • “ Primary objective of computer game or game show is to keep the viewer engaged and want to play the game, but that is not the primary goal of the educator”
  • 5. ATTRIBUTES OF SUCCESSFUL ACADEMIC GAMES
    • Must start by identifying educational objective:
      • Memorization of ALWD/Bluebook rules
      • Learn to be nimble with the ALWD/Bluebook and look up cites whenever there is something unusual
      • Citation as persuasion/weight of authority – Kris Franklin
    • Best use is as an application of previously-learned information or rules, and not as a means to introduce new substantive information
    • Should explain why using game – many adult learners expressed dissatisfaction with “just playing”
    • If possible, have a means for there to be multiple winners.
      • For example, prizes to everybody who attains a certain level
  • 6. ATTRIBUTES OF SUCCESSFUL ACADEMIC GAMES
    • Should be easy to learn and hard to master
      • Easy Rules
      • Levels
      • Timing (Competition can’t become an end in and of itself – it must be part of academic goal; but some timing for a “game”)
    • More than one session per semester
    • Immediate feedback
    • Humor/Fantasy (but not more interesting displays for wrong answers)
    • Winning must be based on competence and not random chance – no “wild cards” or “devils”
    • No situation where lose points
    • Medium unimportant
  • 7. How to Get a Copy of This Presentation
    • Email: [email_address] or
    • [email_address]
    • Download at SlideShare.net
  • 8. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    • Karen L. Baranich & Cynthia C. Currie, Come Play! Using Games to Teach, Motivate, and Engage , INTERCOM, Sept. 10, 2004, at 6, http://www.stc.org/intercom/PDFs/2004/20040910_06-09.pdf.
    • KATHY DIVEBLISS & LYNNE AMES, WINTER INST.: THE POWER OF ADULT EDUC., Using Games or Math Starters in the GED Classroom19 (2007), http://www.ciesc.k12.in.us/adulted/winterinstitute2007 (follow “Using Games or Math Starters.pdf” hyperlink).
    • Kris Franklin, “. . . See Erie.”: Critical Study of Legal Authority , 31 U. ARK. LITTLE ROCK L. REV. 109 (2008).
    • Steven J. Friedland, How We Teach: A Survey of Teaching Techniques in American Law Schools , 20 SEATTLE U. L. REV. 1 (1996).
  • 9. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    • Margaret E. Gredler, Games and Simulations and Their Relationships to Learning , in ASS’N FOR EDUC. COMM’CNS AND TECH., HANDBOOK OF RESEARCH FOR EDUCATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY 571 (D. Jonassen ed., 2003).
    • ROBERT T. HAYS, NAVAL AIR WARFARE CTR. TRAINING SYS. DIV., THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INSTRUCTIONAL GAMES: A LITERATURE REVIEW AND DISCUSSION (2005), http://www.stormingmedia.us/53/5391/A539144.pdf.
    • Rita Kumar & Robin Lightner, Games as an Interactive Classroom Technique: Perceptions of Corporate Trainers, College Instructors and Students , 19 INT’L J. TEACHING & LEARNING HIGHER EDUC. 53 (2007), http://www.isetl.org/ijtlhe/pdf/IJTLHE157.pdf.
  • 10. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    • Tracy L. McGaugh, Generation X in Law School: The Dying of the Light or the Dawn of a New Day? , 9 J. LEGAL WRITING INST. 119 (2003).
    • Karen Mika, Games in the Law School Classroom: Enhancing the Learning Experience , 18 PERSP. 1 (2009).
    • DIANA MUNGAI, DIANNE JONES & LORNA WONG, 18TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON DISTANCE TEACHING AND LEARNING, GAMES TO TEACH BY (2005), http://www.uwex.edu/disted/conference/Resource_library/proceedings/02_47.pdf.
  • 11. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    • Julie A. Oseid, Take Me Out to the Ball Game: Using the Seventh-Inning Stretch to Teach Law Students , 82 N.D. L. REV. 465 (2006).
    • R. Rex Parris & James Wren, Reach Jurors Across the Generations: Recognizing the Effects of Life Experiences Will Help You Segment a Jury Pool into Groups Whose Values and Prejudices You Can Accommodate , 44 TRIAL 19 (2008).
    • Marc Prensky, The Motivation of Gameplay: The Real 21st Century Learning Revolution , 10 ON HORIZON 5 (2002), http://serc.carleton.edu/resources/1613.html.
    • JON W. RAMSEY & M. CRAIG EDWARDS, MOTIVATIONAL GAMES: AN INTERACTIVE APPROACH TO IMPROVING STUDENT LEARNING (2003), http://www.agedweb.org/WRAEC/2003/poster/ramsey,edwards.pdf.
  • 12. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    • J.M. Randell et al., The Effectiveness of Games for Educational Purposes: A Review of Recent Research , 23 SIMULATION & GAMING 261 (1992).
    • Maritza Maribel Martinez Sanchez & Armando Perez Morfin, Interactive Games in the Teaching-Learning Process of a Foreign Language , 4 TEORIA Y PRAXIS 47 (2007), http://www.teoriaypraxis.uqroo.mx/doctos/Numero4/Martinez-Perez-Portillo.pdf.
    • Felicia A. Smith, Games for Teaching Information Literacy Skills , LIBR. PHIL. & PRAC., Dec. 2007, at 1, http://unllib.unl.edu/LPP/f-smith.pdf.
  • 13. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    • Marci L. Smith & Naomi Harlin Goodno, Bluebook Madness: How to Have Fun Teaching Citation , 16 PERSP. 40 (2007).
    • Panagiotis Tsigaris, Is there a Double Dividend from Classroom Experimental Games? , 1 A M . J. B US . E DUC . 23 (2008), http://www.cluteinstitute-onlinejournals.com/PDFs/1058.pdf.