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How to choose between 2 jobs - advice for grads

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As a hiring manager for a large multi national bank, Director in several small and mid-sized companies, and as a University professor, I am asked the same question time and time again by students …

As a hiring manager for a large multi national bank, Director in several small and mid-sized companies, and as a University professor, I am asked the same question time and time again by students trying to choose between jobs...."If I have a few offers on the table, how do I select which job to take?"

Well, rather than repeat myself over and over again, I have put together an example hypothetical rubric that I think could help guide a robust decision-making process.

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  • 1. HOW TO CHOOSE BETWEEN TWO JOBS? Selena Sol presents….. selena@selenasol.com http://www.linkedin.com/pub/eric-tachibana/0/33/b53 http://www.slideshare.net/selenasol advice for grads
  • 2. As a hiring manager for a large multi national bank, Director in several small and mid-sized companies, and as a University professor, I am asked the same question time and time again by students trying to choose between jobs...."If I have a few offers on the table, how do I select which job to take?" Well, rather than repeat myself over and over again, I have put together an example hypothetical rubric that I think could help guide a robust decision- making process. The key to the rubric is that it tries to balance career aspirations against life goals and provide a semi-quantitative gauge to make the process of choosing more explicit and less guesswork. What you need to do is to fill out the qualitative text in the Job A and Job B columns. Next, use a simple coding mechanism to evaluate the strengths versus weaknesses of each job for each category. At the bottom, you sum up the scores to give yourself a good recommendation. After you’ve completed one round, erase the data and ask someone trusted to complete it for you, and compare the results
  • 3.   JOB A JOB B IT'S GOOD FOR  MY CAREER Will I succeed? The role seems to have organizational support which means I will get the support I need in terms of budget, air cover, partners, and political clout, but I am worried that my skill set is fairly weak, so there is a real chance that my delivery will not be enough to really kick butt. More importantly, this is a job that does not really fit well with my personality. It does not leverage my personality strengths and it seems to depend on areas where I am actually weak. Yes, there is a great fit between my skills as well as my personality type. In fact, it seems to leverage what I have previously done with synergy. In addition, the role has a reasonable amount of organizational support. Will I be recognized? Unsure, it is not clear that my boss is the kind of boss that will get me public recognition. He may want some of the glory for himself….. Yes. Based on what I know from his previous actions, the boss will recognize my accomplishments to me and to the larger community Will I develop my career? While this is a good role in and of itself, it is actually a step down in the hierarchy. I need to be careful of perception. Yes, from a CV perspective, this will be seen as a nice addition, helping to build a picture of me as a well-rounded manager with both depth and breadth Will the role get targeted in the next economic downturn? Not likely, the org needs this role in good times and bad. My job will be secure if I do a good job Maybe. It is a new role for the org and it is yet to be seen if it will stick Will damage of failure be mitigated? This is a high profile role and it is an easy to be targeted by my seniors as the one to "take the fall". The hiring manager would likely be the one to take the brunt of failure. I'd actually be fairly protected Will I be compensated? I don't know how well this manager comps his people, but this division makes a lot of revenue for the firm, so it seems likely that comp would be larger for this division, relative to other roles in the firm. Whatever the case, the base salary is OK Yes. Research with friends shows that this manager comps her people well. This is shown in the fact that the base salary is actually more than the other option Will I be promoted? Hard to see where I can go from the role. The one-up seems very stationary and I don't see that they will move in order to open up career growth for me. Also, there are lots of candidates for the nice roles that I would have to compete against. Yes. The hiring manager plans to go back to the US in 2 years. This gives me enough time to prove myself and then position myself as a successor. I'LL HAVE FUN I'll learn and grow I am really excited about the learning potential here. I feel that I will learn a great deal about the business, the actual job role itself, and about leading a team. There seems to be a budget for training and the organizational culture seems to support it. There are certainly things to learn, but I have a feeling that I'll be focussed more on business-as-usual work, than innovation. I like the manager, but not sure they would be a good mentor for me in my career. I'll be passionate about the job Some. There is an entrepreneurial component to the job as this is setting up the function from scratch. I like the domain. I like what we are trying to accomplish, but it feels slightly business-as-usual I'll have an enjoyable work-life balance and workplace policy/culture/environment There is going to be a lot of work and a lot of pressure to deliver! The culture looks to be very competitive and this is an important-high profile year for the group. Eyes are watching! There will clearly be a lot of work but at the interview the hiring manager said that she is very protective of balance and it will be a priority to create a sustainable work environment. I'll like the people I work with (manager, peers, reports) I really like the hiring manager and the people who would report to me, but the peer groups seems highly political and Machiavellian and the key customer seems a nasty sort've fellow. YES! Great team, great boss, good peers   SCORE -3 11 SCORING RULES (NO WEIGHTING FOR THIS EXAMPLE) -2 -1 +1

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