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Strategic Metrics

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Strategic Metrics, presented at the Leadership Seminar on Strategy, Assessment and Service Development. University of Lund, Sweden. 19th September 2012. Presentation by Selena Killick, Cranfield ...

Strategic Metrics, presented at the Leadership Seminar on Strategy, Assessment and Service Development. University of Lund, Sweden. 19th September 2012. Presentation by Selena Killick, Cranfield University. Presentation discusses the need for assessment of Library Strategies and some of the techniques available to achieve this.

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    Strategic Metrics Strategic Metrics Presentation Transcript

    • Strategic MetricsSelena KillickLibrary Quality OfficerLeadership Seminar on Strategy,Assessment and Service Development.University of Lund19th September 2012.
    • Eras of Library Metrics • Holdings • Physical usage • Customer satisfaction • Electronic usage • Value & Impact
    • Few libraries exist in a vacuum,accountable only to themselves. There isalways a larger context for assessinglibrary quality, that is, what and how welldoes the library contribute to achieving theoverall goals of the parent constituencies? (S. Pritchard 1996)
    • Value & Impact Metrics • Based on what matters the most to your key stakeholders • Identify where the Library impacts upon the goals of the parent organisation • Demonstrate how the library is contributing to the mission of your institution
    • Strategic Metrics • Start by defining your outcomes • What do you want to demonstrate? • What does your institution care about? • SMART outcomes: • Specific • Measureable • Attainable • Relevant • Time-bound • If in doubt, KISS.
    • Good Strategic Metrics • Linked to the University/Library mission & goals • Provide useful information • Reasonably accurate within the data limitations • Ethical • Cost effective
    • Mixed-MethodsApproachQuantitative Qualitative• Library Data • Customer Surveys• Institutional Data • Focus groups• National/International • Observational Studies Data • Interviews• Activity analysis• Return on Investment• Cost benefit
    • Quantitative Data • Be prepared to take a fresh look at your data collection • Look beyond the Library • Talk to other data providers in your institution • Combine data sets • Local (Library & student data), national, international • Check to see what is available before you start to count things
    • Case Study: Cornell University Library Library Value Calculation • Annual Cost to the institution $56,678,222 If CUL did not exist: • Sourcing information and answering enquiries would cost the institution $90,648,785Source: Cornell University Library Research & Assessment Unit
    • Case Study: University of West Florida UWF University Libraries calculated its Return on Investment (ROI) for eight of its services: • students studying in the library; • borrowing books, e-books, DVDs and laptops; • students or faculty members asking reference questions or meeting with reference librarians for individual research consultations; • conducting library instruction sessions; and, • students or faculty members using subscription databases when off-campus. Calculations based on the number of occurrences (service outputs) multiplied by an informal and conservative market value of the occurrence to calculate a summed value for the services. The summed value was then divided by sum of the University Libraries personnel and operating expenditures. • It was calculated that for every dollar expended by the University Libraries, at least $5.89 was returned for the services identified.Source: University of West Florida
    • Case Study: Universityof Huddersfield • Hypothesis: do the students who use the library the most get the highest grades? • Library Usage Data • Book loans • eResources usage • Visits to the Library • Student Attainment Data • Final grade received when graduating
    • Non/Low Use ProjectSource: Stone, G. (2011) 13
    • Measuring Library ImpactSource: Stone, G. (2011)Analysis of the results consistently revealed acorrelation between e-resource use, bookborrowing and student attainmentThis appears to be the case across alldisciplines
    • Thoughts • Does correlation equal causation? • Do our stakeholders like this impact data?
    • Qualitative Assessment • Numbers are only ever half of the story • Customer feedback can provide more insight that data alone • Customer quotes can have great impact on stakeholders
    • The Library now has access to 15,586 full text electronic journals and 9,354 eBooks When I started my distance learningMSc it was the first time I had accesseda digital library with such resources; youhave played a major positive role in my effective learning.
    • Data Management • Data Management is an important part of the planning cycle • Assessment management systems • Qualitative coding software • MS Excel / MS Access
    • Considerations • Bring both the Qualitative and Quantitative together • Collaborate with local experts • Not all news will be good news • Be realistic on what is achievable How many staff-hours were spent counting statistics this year?
    • Common Challenges • Where do I start?! • Finding the time • Getting support from all Library staff • Requesting data from other units • Finding other data sets • Difficulty in analysing and interpreting data • Fear of change • What if I fail?
    • Source: Megan Oakleaf, 2011,
    • Source: Megan Oakleaf, 2011,
    • Source: Megan Oakleaf, 2011,
    • Reporting Back • Know your audience • What do they care about? • What is their level of understanding? • Will they feel threatened by the data? • Tell a story with the data • Begin with the outcomes in mind • Be mindful of the data limitations
    • Case Study: McMaster Universityhttp://library.mcmaster.ca/library-scorecard
    • References • Institutional Return on Investment. University of West Florida. http://libguides.uwf.edu/content.php?pid=188487&sid=2184200 • Library Scorecard: Strategic Objectives, Measures & Initiatives 2011/2012. McMaster University Library, revised April 23, 2012, http://library.mcmaster.ca/library-scorecard • Library Value Calculations. Cornell University Library Research & Assessment Unit. http://research.library.cornell.edu/value • Oakleaf, M. and Matthews, J. (2011). Assessing the Impact of the Academic Library. Presented at the 9th Northumbria International Conference on Performance Measurement in Libraries and Information Services. York, England. 22nd – 26th August. • Stone, G. (2011). The Library Impact Data Project: hit, miss or maybe. Presented at the 9th Northumbria International Conference on Performance Measurement in Libraries and Information Services. York, England. 22nd – 26th August.
    • Thank you!Selena Killicks.a.killick@cranfield.ac.ukTwitter: @SelenaKillickTel: +44(0)1793 785561