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Solar Applications Heating & Cooling in Egypt - focus on industry - Giovanna Ceglie, UNIDO 20130611
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Solar Applications Heating & Cooling in Egypt - focus on industry - Giovanna Ceglie, UNIDO 20130611

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  • 1. Giovanna CeglieUNIDO Representative and Director Regional OfficeSolar Thermal Energy in EgyptConference11 June 2013, Cairo
  • 2. Table of contents GLOBAL ENERGY CHALLENGES UNIDO’S WORK IN THE FIELD OF ENERGY SOLAR PROJECTS IN INDIA AND EGYPT BRIEF CONCLUSIONS2
  • 3. UNIDO AT A GLANCE06/06/11 United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO)= Specialized Agency of the United Nations UNIDO has HQ in Vienna, Austria, a network of 45 fieldoffices, 41 National Cleaner Production Centres and 11Investment and Technology Promotion Offices MANDATE = promote and accelerate sustainable industrialdevelopment, focusing on 3 thematic priorities:• POVERTY REDUCTION THROUGH PRODUCTIVE ACTIVITIES• TRADE CAPACITY BUILDING• ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT
  • 4. Global Energy Challenges• 1.5 billion still lack access to electricity• 2.7 billion rely on traditional biomass• Energy Access: a pre-requisite for PovertyReduction and achievement of MDGsHealth problems and premature deathsClimate change, andHampers socio-economic advancementEnergy Poverty, Energy Security & Climate Change
  • 5. ZambiaUkraineChadThailandSierra LeoneNigeriaLiberiaCambodiaIndiaGuineaEgyptCubaCote d‘IvoireSri LankaAlbaniaUNIDO energy projectsCape VerdeGambiaCameroonComorosKenyaLesothoMadagascarMozambiqueSouth AfricaSudanLaosColombiaChileDominican RepublicUruguayTanzaniaEcuadorBurkina FasoMacedonia ( FRY)TurkeyMoldovaRussiaIranPakistanChinaMalaysiaIndonesiaPhilippinesVietnamMexicoPeruNicaraguaCosta RicaBrazilParaguayUgandaBangladesh
  • 6.  INDUSTRIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGIES INNOVATIVE LOW CARBON TECHNOLOGIES RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES FOR PRODUCTIVE USES Off-grid: stand-alone systems and mini-grids Industrial applications, i.e. solar thermal, biomass6Key Technology Focus
  • 7. TechnologyDemonstrationCapacityBuildingAwarenessRaisingReplicationstrategyFinancinginstrumentsPolicy &Regulation &StandardsUNIDO Energy Strategy: Building Blocks
  • 8. RE in Industrial ApplicationsPotential towards 2050 – UNIDO analysis Manufacturing industry 1/3 of global E use 60% of industry’s total final E use in non-OECD Global industrial production x4 by 2050 Up to 21% of final E-usepossible from RE Bio energy by far largestpotential Also solar thermal and heatpumps8
  • 9. SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING FOR INDUSTRYGROWING SOLAR MARKET (IEA) Solar heating market as a whole is growing at 11%, faster thanPV and CSP Solar thermal collector capacity worldwide was 195 GWth atend of 2010 At this rate market will double to 500 GWth by 2017 (IEA, 2011data)VARIOUS PRODUCTS AND TEMPERATURE RANGES Flat plate: up to 150°C Advanced flat plate / Evacuated tube: 80 to 150°C Concentrating solar technologies: 60 to 400°C9
  • 10. Case1: Promoting industrial applications of solar energy inselected industrial sectors in India - UNIDO-GEF5 Project Objective Promote solar energy in selected industrial sectors Improve competitiveness of industrial sectors while reducing carbonemissions through technological innovation Technology: CSTs, heat pipes, non-imaging concentrators Temperature range: between 150 and 400°C (for CSTs) Target sectors: Food Processing, Paper and Pulp, Fertilizer, Breweries,Pharmaceutical, Textile (Finishing), Refineries, Rubber, Desalination! Pharmaceutical/food processing/dairy & breweries = largest users of processcooling Project will cover both solar heating and cooling applications Status: detailed design phase ongoing; Expected to start Q3-Q4 2013 Similar projects being developed for Malaysia and Egypt10
  • 11. Case2: Egypt11 Developing the policy framework to support the use of renewable energy inindustrial and commercial applications Supporting the deployment of solar thermal technologies for multipurposeapplications in industrial and commercial applications (implementingprojects installing solar thermal technologies and disseminating/upscalinggood practice) Setting up a financial platform to facilitate access to capital Enhancing the local manufacture, supply and distribution of solartechnologies for cooling and heating (securing quality supply throughdeveloping standards, quality control and improving technical skills) Creating a platform to promote partnerships between local industries,international centers of excellence and technology suppliers
  • 12. Hopeful signs and trends Finance and Investment in RE in 2010 amounted to a record USD 211billion More RE investment in developing countries than in developedeconomies About half of new electricity generation capacity worldwide is basedon RE; large share in China, also in Latin America and Africa The biggest markets for RE investment were emerging economies,and with a focus on small scale projects.Source: UNEP / Bloomberg NEF / Frankfurt Business School Plenty of experience on policy instruments for electricity production;much less so for heat from RE sources, and for industrial applications,despite the potential => role for UNIDO12
  • 13. Two final words Economic viability…. but what are we comparing? 1.9 trillion US$ global subsidies for fossil fuels ; 0.5 billion for RE (VEF2013) India: cost of coal power generation equal to PV power generation (VEF2013) The importance of national policy as a catalyst for investment inrenewable energy by giving orientations and (dis)incentives A few ‘side’ effects Job and skills generation Decentralized, small scale solutions fitting communityendowments and needs transparency and accountability ofdecision making process Environmental and health effect13
  • 14. THANK YOU!