Infection prevention and control for Health workers-wellness services

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eDespite great achievements in medical treatments and procedures, infections have emerged that are still of great challenge to mankind e.g. HIV
There has been a paradigm shift from treatment to prevention of diseases worldwide
IPC is meant for everyone in the workplace, workers , excecutives, customers / clients

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Infection prevention and control for Health workers-wellness services

  1. 1. Infection Control The What, Why, Who, How and When Sejojo Phaaroe
  2. 2. ABOUT 80% OF INFECTIONS RUMAGING THE DEVELOPING WORLD ARE PREVENTABLE THE PREVENTION OF INFECTIONS IS CRITICAL
  3. 3. Brief History of Infection Control
  4. 4. History of Infection Control • Despite great achievements in medical treatments and procedures, infections have emerged that are still of great challenge to mankind e.g. HIV • There has been a paradigm shift from treatment to prevention of diseases worldwide
  5. 5. Presentation Outline • What : Definitions • Why practice IPC • How to do IPC • Who is responsible and what are the roles? Team effort • When to practice IPC
  6. 6. The What Definitions
  7. 7. • Microorganisms are part of the normal environment. No human, animal or object are without them. • We normally live in symbiosis with them but sometimes – We lose resistance – They become more virulent
  8. 8. Infection vs Communicable Disease An Infection is an infestation of a host (e.g. a person) by a disease-causing organism. This infestation brings about an Infectious disease. The organism can be: • Bacteria • Viruses • Parasites • Fungi A Communicable Disease is an infectious disease that can be transmitted from one person to another. A Nosocomical Infection is an infection acquired from a health facility
  9. 9. The chain of Infection Airborne Lifestyle Patient Contact Nutrition Staff Age Equipment Disease Visitors Susceptible Host Source of infection Transmission Route
  10. 10. • The aim of Infection Control is to establish and maintain a safe environment of the highest possible level for staff and patients with available resources by Breaking the chain of infection. • This is achieved by breaking the chain of infection at any stage (preferably at the source)
  11. 11. Why The need to practice Infection Prevention and Control
  12. 12. Why do we need IPC? (2) 1. Hospital –acquired infections are a common problem and increase the cost of health care – World Bank: 2/3 of developing countries spend 50% of the health budgets on diseases that are preventable 2. In a health facility there is a high population of staff, patients and /or visitors – Immune suppressed, infected or with other vulnerabilities
  13. 13. Why do we need IPC? (1) 3. There is a high level of activity in HCFs: – Flow of people, equipment and provision in and out of wards 4. Technological developments e.g people hardly leave a hospital without blood sampling 5. Unwise use of Antibiotics and antiseptics: – May lead to the emergence of new strains of microbes which may be resistant to current treatment regimes
  14. 14. The How Measures for IPC
  15. 15. PRECAUTIONS • There are four forms of precaution : 1.Standard: The most basic precautions for the safety of staff and patients regardless of the diagnosis or infection status of the patient 2.Airborne: For specific cases like TB 3.Droplet; precautions for illnesses caused by large droplet particles 4.Contact: For prevention of infections caused by direct or indirect contact
  16. 16. STANDARD PRECAUTIONS (1) 1. Hand washing: with warm running water and soap after handling body fluids and secretions regardless of wearing gloves. – One of the basic elements for hygiene – One of the cheapest of the precautions
  17. 17. STANDARD PRECAUTIONS (2) 2. Wearing clean gloves when handling body fluids, intact skin, contaminated items etc 3. Wearing masks and eye protection when appropriate e.g. Envisaged body fluid splashes and inhalation of hazardous materials 4. Proper handling and storage of clean and soiled equipment to avoid cross contamination. 5. Practicing the safe management of Healthcare waste
  18. 18. 2. Airborne Precautions 1. Wearing of masks 2. Isolation of relevant patients 3. Appropriate ventilation of isolation rooms/wards and patient waiting rooms 4. Minimal movement of infected patients
  19. 19. 3. Droplet Precautions 1. Wearing of masks 2. Isolation of relevant patients 3. Appropriate ventilation of isolation rooms/wards and patient waiting rooms 4. Minimal movement of infected patients
  20. 20. 4. Contact Precautions • Wearing a mask where appropriate • Wearing Personal Protective Clothing to ensure contact with body fluids and secretions is eliminated • Practise safe management of Healthcare waste
  21. 21. In summary • Hand hygiene • Personal protective Clothing • Isolation of patients • Provision of safe food and water • Proper HCW management • Ensuring a clean environment (including surfaces) • Cleaning and disinfection of equipment • Employee health and training programme
  22. 22. Barriers to adhering to Precautions • Lack of role models or role model facilities • Lack of reward for compliers • Lack of institutional priority • Inadequate involvement of staff
  23. 23. Factors of poor adherence • Lack of knowledge • Lack or inadequacy of requirements e.g. Soap and paper towels for hand washing • Forgetfulness • Low staffing • Overcrowding • Lack of evidence based knowledge
  24. 24. The Who Responsibilities for IPC
  25. 25. • IPC is not delegated to any person in particular in the HCF. It is a team effort and it is the responsibility of both medical and non- medical staff.
  26. 26. Functions of the IPC Committee • Surveillance of IPC in the facility • Supervision of the execution of the IPC policy and guidelines • Conduction of formal and informal training in IPC • Research • Review of facility policies, guidelines and procedures • Liaison with departments on IPC • Records and reporting • Representation of facility in relevant forums • Evaluation of interventions
  27. 27. Personnel Responsibilities Infection Control Officer -Knowledge of IPC national & facility policies -Assessment of infection risk and advise on patient isolation -Monitoring of procedures execution -Speedy investigation of potential outbreaks Continues personal study and empowerment -Act as resource person Healthcare facility manager -Ensure availability of resources -Ensure availability of written commitment -Knowledge of policies Clinical staff -Prevention of contamination of samples -Prevention of infecting patients and staff -Knowledge of policies and procedures -Prompt reporting of disparities to supervisors Non-clinical staff -Knowledge and practice of procedures e.g. Ventilation of rooms, hand washing --Supporting clinical IPC campaigns
  28. 28. In conclusion • The practice of IPC strategies is good for the health of the patients and staff but with IPC implementation there are other positive spin- offs e.g. – Team building – Better communication – Improved monitoring – More supporting supervision
  29. 29. When should we practice IPC?

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