• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Deciduous forest vegetation....
 

Deciduous forest vegetation....

on

  • 1,068 views

Deciduous forest vegetation....

Deciduous forest vegetation....

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,068
Views on SlideShare
1,068
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Deciduous forest vegetation.... Deciduous forest vegetation.... Presentation Transcript

    • FA-1FA-1 ACTIVITACTIVIT YY
    • By : Leena Bansal, Sejal Agarwal Lakshya Agarwal, Arpit Agrawal Anoushka Agnihotri, Srijan Sudeep Himanshu Sharma By : Leena Bansal, Sejal Agarwal Lakshya Agarwal, Arpit Agrawal Anoushka Agnihotri, Srijan Sudeep Himanshu Sharma
    • INDEXTOPIC NO. OF SLIDES INTRODUCTION 4-9 CLIMATE 10-12 BOTANY 13-15 DECIDUOUS WOODY PLANTS 16 PLANT ADAPTATIONS 17-18 ANIMAL ADAPTATIONS 19 LEAVES 20-27 PLANTS FOUND 28-39 TREES 40-50 ANIMALS FOUND 51-60 SUBMITTED BY 61-63
    • INTRODUCTION The temperate deciduous forest biome is one of the most interesting biomes of the world because it's always changing. Here, the environment goes through the four seasons of winter, spring, summer, and fall. Because of this, the animals and plants have special adaptations to cope with their habitat. The meaning of the word deciduous describes exactly what the leaves on these trees do: change color in autumn, fall off in the winter, and grow back again in the spring. This is a simple adaptation to survive winter. Come on and explore some more of this ever changing biome known as the temperate deciduous forest. The temperate deciduous forest biome is one of the most interesting biomes of the world because it's always changing. Here, the environment goes through the four seasons of winter, spring, summer, and fall. Because of this, the animals and plants have special adaptations to cope with their habitat. The meaning of the word deciduous describes exactly what the leaves on these trees do: change color in autumn, fall off in the winter, and grow back again in the spring. This is a simple adaptation to survive winter. Come on and explore some more of this ever changing biome known as the temperate deciduous forest.
    • The word "Deciduous" means "falling off or out at a certain season". That explains why deciduous forest means a forest in which the leaves fall off the trees when the winter comes. The types of trees you can find in these three regions are broad leafed deciduous trees and some of the evergreen species. The trees are more commonly known as ash, oak, lime, beech, birch and northern arrow wood. Also found in this biome are wild flowers such as oxlip, bluebells, painted trillium and primrose. As well as things such as carpet moss, tawny milk-cap mushrooms and lady fern. The word "Deciduous" means "falling off or out at a certain season". That explains why deciduous forest means a forest in which the leaves fall off the trees when the winter comes. The types of trees you can find in these three regions are broad leafed deciduous trees and some of the evergreen species. The trees are more commonly known as ash, oak, lime, beech, birch and northern arrow wood. Also found in this biome are wild flowers such as oxlip, bluebells, painted trillium and primrose. As well as things such as carpet moss, tawny milk-cap mushrooms and lady fern.
    • There are many types of animals in the deciduous forest ranging from mammals like deer to bugs like mosquitoes. Many of the animals are either nut and acorn feeders, or omnivores. Many of the animals have adapted to forest life. Some of them hibernate during the winter months. A few common animals found in the deciduous forest are, deer, gray squirrels, mice raccoons, salamanders, snakes, robins, frogs and many types of insects. Some animals migrate south when winter comes. Most deciduous forests are found in Eastern North America somewhere around 35-48° N, and Europe and Asia around 45- 60° N. The average temperature is around 50° F (about 10° C). The average rainfall is 30-60 inches (75-150 cm ) per year. There are many types of animals in the deciduous forest ranging from mammals like deer to bugs like mosquitoes. Many of the animals are either nut and acorn feeders, or omnivores. Many of the animals have adapted to forest life. Some of them hibernate during the winter months. A few common animals found in the deciduous forest are, deer, gray squirrels, mice raccoons, salamanders, snakes, robins, frogs and many types of insects. Some animals migrate south when winter comes. Most deciduous forests are found in Eastern North America somewhere around 35-48° N, and Europe and Asia around 45- 60° N. The average temperature is around 50° F (about 10° C). The average rainfall is 30-60 inches (75-150 cm ) per year.
    • Deciduous biomes are located primarily in the eastern half of the United States, Canada, Europe, parts of Russia, China, and Japan. Deciduous biomes are located primarily in the eastern half of the United States, Canada, Europe, parts of Russia, China, and Japan. lOCATION
    • ClIMATE The average temperature of the forest is about 50 degrees F. The average amount of rainfall in the forest is 30 to 60 inches a year. As the seasons change, so do the colors of the leaves of the deciduous. During the winter months water is generally not available to keep the leaves of some plants alive. Therefore, the leaves of some plants fall off and grow back in the spring. Those plants, like evergreens, keep their leaves during the winter have special adaptations to stay alive. One thing that is interesting about this biome and its climate is that it has four distinct seasons; spring, summer, autumn, and winter.
    • Most deciduous forests have mild summers averaging about 70 °F. Summer months usually begin in early June and end in late August. Winter months don't begin until December. Winter temperatures are fairly cool with an average temperature of a little below freezing. Almost all of the world's deciduous forest is located by an ocean. The ocean and the wind are two big factors of why the temperature and climate change so much in this biome. Climate is a mix of temperature and precipitation. Deciduous forests have almost 14 inches of rain in the winter months and more than 18 inches of rain in the summer.
    • WHAT'S THE TEMPERATE DECIDUOUS FOREST LIKE? One of the most interesting features of the temperate deciduous forest is its four changing seasons. And as the seasons change, so do the colors of the leaves of the deciduous One of the most interesting features of the temperate deciduous forest is its four changing seasons. And as the seasons change, so do the colors of the leaves of the deciduous
    • bOTANYbOTANY
    • In botany and horticulture, deciduous plants, including trees, shrubs and herbaceous perennials, are those that lose all of their leaves for part of the year. This process is called abscission. In some cases leaf loss coincides with winter — namely in temperate or polar climates. In other parts of the world, including tropical, subtropical, and arid regions, plants lose their leaves during the dry season or other seasons, depending on variations in rainfall.
    • The converse of deciduous is evergreen, where green foliage is persistent year round. Plants that are intermediate may be called semi- deciduous; they lose old foliage as new growth begins. Other plants are semi- evergreen and lose their leaves before the next growing season, retaining some during winter or dry periods. Some trees, including a few species of oak, have desiccated leaves that remain on the tree through winter. The converse of deciduous is evergreen, where green foliage is persistent year round. Plants that are intermediate may be called semi- deciduous; they lose old foliage as new growth begins. Other plants are semi- evergreen and lose their leaves before the next growing season, retaining some during winter or dry periods. Some trees, including a few species of oak, have desiccated leaves that remain on the tree through winter.
    • DECIDUOUs wOODY plANTs The deciduous characteristic has developed repeatedly among woody plants. Trees include Maple, many Oaks, Elm, Aspen, and Birch, among others, as well as a number of coniferous genera, such as Larch and Metasequoia. Deciduous shrubs include honeysuckle, viburnums, and many others. Most temperate woody vines are also deciduous, including grapes, poison ivy, Virginia creeper, wisteria, etc. The characteristic is useful in plant identification; for instance in parts of Southern California and the American Southeast, deciduous and evergreen oak species may grow side by side.
    • Cooler temperatures and limited sunlight are two climatic conditions that tell the tree to begin adapting. When temperatures are cold, the broad leaves expose too much surface area to water loss and tissue damage. To help prevent this damage from occurring, deciduous trees make internal and physical adaptations that are triggered by changes in the climate. PLANT ADAPTIONS
    • In the Fall, when these conditions occur, the tree cuts off the supply of water to the leaves and seals off the area between the leaf stem and the tree trunk. In the spring, deciduous trees begin producing thin, broad, light-weight leaves. This type of leaf structure easily captures the sunlight needed for food production (photosynthesis). The broad leaves are great when temperatures are warm and there is plenty of sunlight.
    • Animal Adaptations Migration and hibernation are two adaptations used by the animals in this biome. While a wide variety of birds migrate, many of the mammals hibernate during the cold winter months when food is in short supply. Another behavioral adaptation some animals have adopted is food storage. The nuts and seeds that are plentiful during the summer are gathered by squirrels, chipmunks, and some jays, and are stored in the hollows of trees for use during the winter months. Cold temperatures help prevent the decomposition of the nuts and seeds.
    • TYPES OF LEAVESThere's a lot of different terms used to identify the type of leaf you're examining. Below is a series of diagrams labeling the different parts, shapes, and styles of leaves. Take a closer look and learn some new vocabulary. Here, you can see the major parts of an individual leaf. The stipule isn't always found on a leaf and the stalk is also called the petiole sometimes. The direction in which the veins run along the blade of the leaf is described as either parallel or pinnate.
    • Here, we see five different pictures of Compound Leaves. Compound Leaves refer to a set of leaves found in a set pattern on a specific plant. So, the leaves are not identified by a single leaf, my multiples of them. The tiny, individual leaves on each whole compound leaf are called leaflets. 1. Pinnate 2. Twice pinnate 3. Palmate 4. Three-divided (trifoliate) 5. Three-times-three-divided
    • Leaves of deciduous forest changing colour while there is change in seasons.
    • During the winter months water is generally not available to keep the leaves of some plants alive. Therefore, the leaves of some plants fall off and grow back in the spring. Those plants, like evergreens, that keep their leaves during the winter have special adaptations to stay alive. Why is it advantageous for deciduous tress to drop their leaves every fall?
    • The temperate deciduous gets the second-most amount of rainfall per year. In the winter, precipitation (rainfall) is in the form of sleet, snow, and hail. The average rainfall is 30 to 60 inches per year.  The average temperature of the forest is about 50 degrees Fahrenheit.
    • What Colors Are Certain Leaves In the Fall ? Black walnut and butternut Drop leaves before they turn color Locust Stays green until leaves drop Ash Plum purple Red maple, dogwood, sassafras, and scarlet oak Dark red Sugar maple and sumac Flame red and orange Oak, beech, larch, elm, hickory, and sycamore Tan or brown Poplar, birch, tulip tree, willow Yellow
    • Different samples of leaves of deciduous forest…
    • Plants found…..
    • The American Beech tree grows in the southern and eastern parts of India. It grows in deciduous forests all over Maine and northern Massachusetts. It grows best in deep, rich, moist, well- drained soils. The American beech is a tall and wide tree. The mature tree size is anywhere from 90 to 100 feet tall, and spreads 50 to 70 feet. The bark that grows on the tree is very smooth, pale and gray. The growth buds have a yellow tinge, looking a little like a bullet. The leaves are bright green and are about three inches in length. They start wide, and then get smaller and smaller, until they come to a point. The leaves have distinct, strong veins and toothed edges. Common Names: beech, Carolina beech, gray beech, red beech, ridge beech, stone beech, white beech, winter beech. Genus: Fagus Species: grand folia American beech
    • Carpet Moss Genus: Mnium Species: hornum Mosses are simple, rootless evergreen plants. They can live in a wide variety of habitats, but are most often found covering the ground, growing on stream beds, and on the base of trees in deciduous woodlands. Carpet moss grows in eastern India . Carpet Moss, like its name, carpets the ground. In the spring the carpet moss is golden green, and turns dark green as it gets older. It looks almost velvety. Its leaves grow parallel to each other and taper off to a point at the end. The edges of the leaves have long, narrow cells which grow in pairs and make the margins look serrated.
    • Common Lime Common Name(s): Lime Tree, Linden, Basswood, Bast Tree, Spoon wood Genus: Tilia Species: x europaea The common lime is a tall, stately tree . it is known as a linden tree. It is the tallest broad-leaved tree in Bengal. In the past it was found growing throughout the old growth forests of Chennai. Today there are no original forests left there, but the common lime is still widespread because it is frequently planted along avenues and in gardens. The common lime can live up to 500 years.
    • Guelder Rose Common Names: European Cranberry, Cramp Bark, Snowball Tree, Red Elder, Rose Elder Genus: Viburnum Species: opulus The Guelder Rose prefers to grow at low altitudes and in semi-shade in India. It is native to the woodlands of the Indian deciduous forest. It is found at the edges of woods, hedgerows and marshes. It is found in agricultural zones 3 to 8, which is a relatively cool climate. It grows in both heavy clay and acidic soil. In the wild, Lady ferns can be found growing in meadows, open thickets, moist woods, and along stream beds. They also grow
    • Lady Fern Common Names: Northern Lady Fern Genus: Athyrium Species: felix-femina Parts Used: the leaves are used for decoration You may have Lady fern in your own house. Many people use it to decorate their homes. You may see it hanging or potted. People in Victorian times were crazy about Lady fern. However, Lady fern is not only found in the house. It also grows in the wild, especially in deciduous forests and the taiga of North America and Eurasia. Lady Fern is a deciduous, perennial fern about 24 to 36 inches tall. Its light green, lacy leaves are about 24 to 30" long and 6 to 9" wide and tapered at both ends. The fronds are cut twice and grow from a
    • Northern Arrowwood Common Names: Smooth Arrowwood Genus: Viburnum Species: recognitum Parts Used: leaves and berries These plants have dark green, oval deciduous leaves which grow opposite each other on the stem. The tips of the leaves are pointed and the bottoms are rounded or heart shaped. The leaves are about 4 inches long and 3 inches across. Northern Arrowwood is different from other viburnums because its leaves have big spiky edges, but its surface is smooth. It has small white to pink flowers in flat-topped clusters about 4 inches across. The plant blooms from May to June. The leaves and flowers grow on the top of long shoots. The fruits of the arrowwood are fleshy and blue-black in color about 1/2 inch across. They are a favorite food of Ruffed Grouse and chipmunks. Deer love to eat the leaves and stems.
    • Pecan Genus: Carya Species: illinoensis Parts used: the nuts The pecan tree can grow to enormous heights, sometimes to heights of 180 feet, and has an upright growing pattern. The bark is pale gray or whitish brown, scaly, and deeply furrowed. The bark on the pecan tree is rough and scaly, and is pale grey or brown. The heartwood is solid brown and black. The leaves grow in groups of 11-17. Each leaf is slightly pointed at the tip. The width of the leaves are approximately 3 inches. Each full grown leaf is about 5 inches top to bottom. This tree is a perennial. The Pecan tree has a shallow root system. The flowers are tiny and hang down in tassels. The pecan uses wind to pollinate. The pecan nut is long and pointed with a thin shell.
    • Shagbark Hickory Genus: Carya Species: ovata The Shagbark Hickory tree has an ashy gray bark similar to birch trees except its bark separates into long strips, which give the trunk it's shaggy look. The Shagbark Hickory tree is tall and straight and can grow to about 100 feet tall. The Shagbark Hickories branches can spread to 25 feet, the lower branches somewhat droop while the upper branches are upright. The branches in the middle are just about horizontal. The wood of this tree is strong and tough. The Shagbark has both male and female flowers. Male flowers grow in bundles called catkins and female flowers are in clusters called petal lets. The Shagbarks leaves are compound and alternate, with five or seven broad, toothed leaflets. The leaflets can be smooth or hairy and can be up to 10 inches long and 5 inches broad. The twigs bear brown buds. The nuts have thick husks, but the shell inside is thin and is edible with a sweet taste.
    • Tawny Milkcap Mushroom Common Names: Weeping Milkcap, Chichitake Genus: Lactarius Species: volemus Parts Used: The Tawny Milkcap mushroom is edible The Tawny Milkcap Mushroom can be found in most deciduous forests. . In South it is known as chichitake and is used to make a flavorful broth. If you are a mushroom hunter, you may like to eat the Twany Milkcap. This species is edible and is a favorite of collectors. It is best eaten fresh because a white "milk", or sticky latex, seeps out and turns brown when the gills are cut, giving it the name Twany Milkcap. It has a strong fish-like odor, especially when dry. Their flavor is mild. The Twany Milkcap's cap is 2 to 5 inches wide, and smooth with a dry, velvety feel to it. The upper part is orange-brown in colo
    • White Birch Common Names: Canoe Birch, Silver Birch, Paper Birch Genus: Betula Species: papyrifera Parts Used: leaves, sap, lumber, The White Birch is a small to medium sized deciduous tree which grows to 70 or 80 feet in height. As far as trees go it doesn't live very long, only about 140 years. Small hear- shaped leaves are found at the ends of drooping twigs and branches. The paper birch has both male and female flowers called catkins. These turn into little winged nutkins, which ripen in early August to mid September. The wings help the seeds to fly away from the parent tree so there won't be competition for food and water. You can identify this tree by its white bark which peels easily and is marked by narrow horizontal stripes. White birch trees can either have one slender stem or several stems. Moose like to browse on the young trees and will eat off the tops.
    • White Oak Genus: Quercus Species: alba The White Oak tree can grow from 80 to 100 feet tall ,3 to 4 feet in diameter around the trunk and can spread from 50 to 80 feet. The Oak tree grows upright and its bark is whitish gray . The life span of the Oak tree, if undisturbed is 500 to 600 years old. The Oak tree's leaves have 7 to 9 rounded points which resemble finger like lobes. In May and early June male flowers appear in slender catkins. Female flowers are not noticeable to the naked eye. The Oak tree's seeds are commonly known as acorns, they are small oval shaped nuts with a cap and they are mostly eaten by squirrels ,chipmunks and deer. The Oak tree grows in many different habitats. It can grow from seacoasts to high mountain slopes.
    • Trees…
    • The oak trees in Sherwood Forest in Great Britain are 500 years old! Oaks can grow to a height of 120 feet! Acorns are the fruits of the oak tree. Oak trees produce lots of acorns every 3-4 years. Squirrels like eating them and they bury some. Seedlings grow from the buried acorns the following spring Oak trees
    • Eglantine A very hardy shrub that can get quite big, possibly up to 10 feet tall. It blooms just once, with single pink flowers about 1.5 to 2 inches across. The foliage emits a nice apple fragrance, especially when rubbed. In the fall, Eglantine puts on a nice show with lots of bright red leaves.
    • Birch trees can grow to a height of 40 feet. The bark of the tree peels as it ages. Birches are typical "pioneer" trees, able to invade and colonise bare land successfully. Birch trees are wind pollinated BIRCH TREE
    • FLOWERING DOGWOOD The dogwood flowers in early spring. It can grow to a height of 20-30 feet. It's leaves are typically 6-12 inches in diameter and turn brilliant red, orange and scarlet in the fall of the year. It bears clusters of red fruit in the winter.
    • RED MAPLE TREE This tree grows everywhere from the organic muck of shallow fresh water swamps to the rocky quartzite slopes of the Appalachian Mountains. This tree's small, numerous red flowers bloom in the early spring, before the leaves come out. The leaves are 3 or 5 lobed, red stemmed, and vary from 2 to 5 inches long.
    • EASTERN HEMLOCK Hemlocks in the northeast are being attacked by the Wolly adelgid, an Asian sap-sucking insect that is usually fatal to the trees, especially those individuals that are growing in shady onditions. The hemlock is a conifer with short needles, usually less than an inch long, that grow in two rows on each side of the branch.
    • TULIP TREE The Tulip tree is the tallest hardwood in the eastern forests of North America. Often between 100 and 200 feet in height at maturity, this tree grows rapidly, sometimes over 6 feet a year! It is actually in the magnolia family, and it bears large, bee- pollinated tulip-like 6 petal yellow, green, and orange flowers in the late spring. Tuliptree leaves are 4-6 inches long, about as wide, 4 lobed, and bilaterally symmetric. They are the only 4 lobed symmetric leaves in the eastern forests.
    • WITCH HAZEL Witch hazel is a tree with branches that are very flexible -- so springy, in fact, that American Indians used them to make bows! Despite its name, witch hazel has nothing to do with witchcraft. In medieval English, witch was spelled wych, and it meant flexible.
    • BEECH TREES The beech casts some of the darkest shade in the forest, and very few other trees grow under it. The beech tree is most easily identified by its bark. The bark is light colored, and very smooth, as this tree never develops furrows. The leaves are fairly small, toothed, with veins terminating in teeth. There are no lobes on the leaves, which turn yellow in the fall. The nuts, which fall before the leaves turn, are small, triangular shaped, and edible!
    • SUGAR MAPLE TREES In the fall, the sugar maple becomes the most colorful tree in the forest. The fall foliage is usually orange or red, and the whole tree generally turns at once. This is the tree whose sap is used to produce maple syrup.
    • animals Foundanimals Found
    • American Bald Eagle Genus: Haliaeetus Species: leucocephalus The Bald Eagle is a large fierce looking bird. It's name in Latin means "the sea eagle with a white head". It is the national symbol of the United States of America. Benjamin Franklin had suggested that the national symbol be the Wild Turkey, because the Bald Eagle was "a bird of bad moral character", but he was outvoted. Today it is seen on many things in the United States, such as money, seals, and other patriotic symbols. The Bald Eagle generally lives forty-five to fifty years in captivity and twenty-five years in the wild. It is one of the largest flying birds seen in the United States. It stands between 30.4 and 36.4 inches tall, or about as high as an average office desk. It has a five and a half to eight foot wing span. That's about as long as a big dining room table. The head of the bird is white, the body of the bird is black, and the tail is white. The feet are a dull orange and its beak is yellow.
    • American Black Bear Genus: Ursus Species: americanus The American Black Bear, like most bears, lack the distinctive shoulder hump that the Grizzly Bear has. This bear can run up to 25 miles per hour, which is very quick for its 220-594 pound body. Their feet relate to humans, because they touch the ground in a "heel, toe, heel, toe, etc." pattern. They have rounded ears, a short stubby tail, and short claws that are useful in climbing trees. The American Black Bear is usually black but can have phases of brown, cinnamon, beige and even a bluish- white. The length of this bear's body is usually 5-6 feet from nose to tail and 32-38 inches from paw to the top of its shoulder. They live in most of North America.
    • Coyote Genus: Canis Species: latrines Coyotes can weigh from 15 to 44 lbs. Their bodies are 30 to 40 inches long and their tail is 12 to 16 inches long. They are about 15 to 20 inches tall. Their fur is grayish tan. They have a long pointed nose and large ears. Coyotes can live almost anywhere. They now live in most of North America and Central America, from Alaska to Nova Scotia and Panama. They even live in the suburbs of large cities. People have even blamed them for eating their pets. But the coyote's original habitat was the big open grassland. Coyotes become mature in 1-2 years, and have about 2 to 12 puppies, but usually 6. Dad stays with his family and both parents take care of the puppies.
    • Duckbill Platypus Genus: Ornithorhynchus Species: anatinus The duckbill platypus lives in the deciduous forests of Australia. It is about half the size of a house cat. It has a thick covering of hair except for its bill and feet. Its back is a dark brown and has light yellow on its stomach . The tail has fatty tissue which is used to store energy. The body is streamlined and flat. It has short legs and webbed front feet. The back feet are partially webbed. Their feet have broad nails for digging. Males have hollow spurs on their ankles which carry venom. They use this venom as protection. It has a bill shaped like a duck's bill. This bill is sensitive to touch. It is flat, soft and rubbery with many nerves. The bill has nostrils for breathing that can be closed when they go under water. When you look at a picture of a platypus, the eyes look about the size of a dime. The platypus does not have teeth, so it grinds its food with grinding pads in its mouth. The eyes are just behind their bill. The ear slits are behind the eyes. It can make sounds such as a growl, and a clucking noise. It weighs between 1 1/2 and 5 1/2 pounds. It is from 26 inches to 39 inches long. It can walk or swim.
    • Eastern Chipmunk Genus: Tamias Species: striatus The Eastern chipmunk is a very cute little animal. It is a ground-dwelling squirrel about 5-6 inches long and weighing about 3 ounces. It is a brownish-red color. Its head has two white stripes above and below the eye. Its ears are short and rounded and stick straight up on its head. Five black stripes with white lines go down their backs. Its belly and sides are white and its tail is black above and rusty underneath. When it runs it sticks its tail straight up. It makes a sharp chattering or chucking noise when upset.
    • European Red Squirrel Genus: Sciurus Species: vulgaris The European red squirrel lives in the European Deciduous Forest. The red squirrel prefers to live in the forest but in some places they live in gardens and parks. The European Deciduous Forest has 4 seasons. It is cold in the winter and very warm in the summer. It spreads from northern Portugal to southern Norway. Eastern Europe is dry. There are not many species of trees in Europe. It rains 30-50 in. a year. The latitudes are 40° to 60° North, and longitudes 5° to 40° East.
    • Fat Dormouse Common Names: Edible Dormouse, Squirrel-tailed Dormous Genus: Myoxus Species: glis There are 21 different species of dormice. The fat dormouse is the largest dormouse in Europe. They can be found in Africa, Europe, Asia, and Japan. These rodents look like short, fat squirrels with bushy tails. The European and Asian dormice are the largest in the dormice family. The fat dormouse is at home in European deciduous or mixed forests. In this habitat it can find the food it needs and shelter. It can adapt and thrive in many types of woodland but does not do well in evergreen forests. The dormouse finds shelter in hollow trees, rock crevices or even woodpecker holes. In the deciduous forests the temperatures in the summer months are an average of 70° F. In the winter months the temperature is a little below freezing.
    • Least Weasel Genus: Mustela Species: nivalis Deep in the woods of the Northeast Asian deciduous forest roams the least weasel. Its long slender body and sharp nails help this mammal hunt day and night. The least weasel is the smallest carnivore in the world. The least weasel's habitat consists of living in stone walls, hedges, farmland, and the woods. Least weasels avoid deep forests, sandy deserts, and open spaces. Male and female least weasels both have their own territory. Females may overlap with another female, but a male's territory is all his, he may even fight for it. The male's territory may consist of 40 acres.
    • White-tailed Deer Common Names: Virginia white-tailed deer, Key deer, jumping deer Genus: Odocoileus Species: virginianus The fur of the white-tailed deer is a grayish color in the winter then more red comes out during the summer. It has a band of white fur behind its nose, in circles around the eyes, and inside the ears. More white fur goes down the throat, on the upper insides of the legs and under the tail. Only the males have antlers, which they shed in January to March, and grow out again in April or May. The white- tailed deer can be 3 to 3 1/2 feet at the shoulders. Males can weigh up to 400 pounds, and females from 70 to 200 pounds. It is mostly active at night but they can be active at any time. They will feed mostly just before dawn for several hours and again from late afternoon untildusk. They graze on green plants in the summer and nuts and acorns during the winter. They will also eat twigs and the buds of birch, maple and conifer trees in the winter.
    • TOPIC NO. OF SLIDES 5-12 13-19 20-27 28-39 40-50 SEJAL AGARWAL 51-60 1-4 , 61-63 AND COMPILING
    • Hope U liked it…….!!!