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XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
XML and Databases
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XML and Databases

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An Overview of XML and Databases

An Overview of XML and Databases

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  • 1. XML and Databases Presentation By: Oluwasegun Adedugbe and Pavan Kurma Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Technology, Staffordshire University, Stafford, ST18 0AD
  • 2. XML Overview  XML stands for eXtensible Markup Language  Widely used on the World Wide Web as a means of communication between different types of web components  It is a W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) standard
  • 3. XML Characteristics  XML is a markup language, like HTML  XML primarily consists of tags, attributes and data  XML tags are not pre-defined like HTML  XML tags are user-defined  While HTML defines the layout for data, XML describes the data  XML documents need to be well formed
  • 4. XML Usage  Transporting, Storing and Sharing Data Examples:  Software Updates  XML Sitemaps  Web-based feeds, such as RSS, jobs, weather reports, stock updates, etc.  Third-party application
  • 5. Strengths of XML  It is written in plain text format  It is platform independent, either hardware or software  It works well with applications  It’s a W3C standard, which makes it universal
  • 6. XML vs. RDMSs  XML does not support traditional elements of relational databases such as triggers, indexes, queries across multiple documents, etc.  XML will not be suitable for very large amounts of data unlike relational databases  XML is file-based while relational databases are server-based
  • 7. XML Issues  Speed – Data retrieval could be relatively slow due to verbose nature  Security – Data could be interrupted during transmission  Scope – Limited scope in comparison to relational databases
  • 8. XML Schema  Schemas are used to validate XML documents  A Schema defines the structure and data constraints of an instance XML document  Examples are DTD (Document Type Definition), XML Schema, etc.
  • 9. XML Validation  Validators check an XML document against its schema and determines if its valid or not   Examples of XML Validation tools are Core Filing, W3C XML Validator, etc.
  • 10. Conclusion  XML stores, transports and shares data. It’s data storage capabilities is very limited in relation to relational databases  It is a very vital tool for communicating between applications over networks  It’s use as a means of data storage should be for small/medium-sized amount of data
  • 11. References  USA. Oracle. (2012) Oracle XML DB Developer’s Guide. California: Oracle Corporation. (11.2).  IBM. (2012) Investigate current XML tools. developerWorks. [Online]. (June). Available from http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/xml/library/xxmltools/index.html. [Accessed: 3 December 2012]  IBM. (2011) Investigate state-of-the-art XML compression techniques. developerWorks. [Online]. (July). Available from http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/xml/library/xdatacompression/index.html. [Accessed: 3 December 2012]
  • 12. References  W3Schools (2012) XML Tutorial. [Online] Available from: http://www.w3schools.com/xml/default.asp [Accessed: 24 November 2012]  Maneth, S. (2010) Introduction to XML, [Handout] XML and Databases. ICT Module. NICTA and UNSW, Department, South Wales, September 2010.  Gonzalez, M., Prieto, M., Nieto, M. (2009) A Study of Native XML Databases. Department of Computer Science, University of Valladolid, Spain.
  • 13. References  Papamarkos, G., Zamboulis, L., Poulovassilis, A. (2007) XML Databases. School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Birbeck College, University of London.

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