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    • MODERN MARKETING JUL.20.12 ®WWW.THEDRUM.COM CANNED GOODS AISLE£5.25 299 772046 063004 THE BRANDS LEFT ON THE SHELF
    • Digital marketingwith a difference...An agency driven by ROIand a passion for serviceexcellence Click Consult are a specialist multi-lingual digital marketing agency with over one hundred in-house experts within SEO, PPC, Social Media, Reputation Management, Web Development and Mobile Web.Head Office Telephone:Unit B1, Willow House, 0845 205 0292Oaklands Office ParkHooton Road, Hooton,Cheshire, CH66 7NZ Website: www.clickconsult.comLondon OfficeRegent’s Place, Email:338 Euston Road info@clickconsult.comLondon, NW1 3BT Voted UK’s Number 1 SEO Company 2008 to July 2012* Listed as No. 1 ‘Top UK SEO Companies 2012’ *As ranked on topseos.co.uk July 2012 *As listed by ibtimes.com July 2012 SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMISATION
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com INSIDE03 20 July 2012 VOLUME #33 ISSUE #15 ® Cover: courtesy of Kelly K Jones www.kellykristinjones.com Kelly K Jones is a Chicagoan photographer who provided images for this issue’s feature on The Museum of Failed Products in Ann Arbor, Michigan. 26 05 Leader The Drum’s opinion editor Cameron Clarke discusses the apathy surrounding the London Olympics. 06 Agenda Some of the latest insights and analysis into the media and marketing industries. 12 Pitch news A round-up of accounts under review and recent account activity, including the NSPCC’s advertising account. 13 People on the move The latest appointment news, including Mecca Bingo’s hiring of James Condon as brand marketing director. 14 Simplicity of thought The Drum catches up with the ‘quiet man of advertising’, M&C Saatchi’s Jeremy Sinclair, to talk about the brutal simplicity of thought. 17 The Works A round-up of some of the best new creative campaigns, including m-four’s design work for the invitations to the opening of the National Football Museum. 22 The silent salesman Steve Osborne of Osborne Pike explores how digital technology is shaking up packaging design. 25 Becoming a socialeader The Drum presents an extract from Jay Oatway’s Deadwater: the Museum of Failed Products displays a collection of brands which have failed to launch Mastering Story, Community and Influence, which explores the use of social media to become a ‘socialeader’. 17 COVER STORY 26 Failure to launch When brands fail to succeed, where do they go to die? The Museum of Failed Products serves as a graveyard to failed ideas from throughout the twentieth century. 30 Last Word Tim Downs, director, Aberfield Communications, takes the last word this issue. 28 Directory 31 Jobs SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT Paper & Print This issue of the magazine comes with a special paper and print review, published on a different stock. The review showcases opinions and insights on the paper and print industries: from the dominance of digital to the ManvsMachine has created the identity for Channel 4’s new channel 4seven resurgence in using innovative print techniques.
    • “The most awarded digital agencyoutside of London.” The DrumPioneering digital experience since 1999.www.codecomputerlove.com
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com LEADER05contributors this issue mairi clark, journalist interviews M&C Saatchi is london 2012 really everyone’s games? founding director Jeremy Sinclair to discuss the brutal simplicity of thought I steve osborne, founder, osborne pike takes a look f you believe the well-rehearsed rhetoric of David Cameron and Lord Coe, the Lon- at the increasing use of don 2012 Olympics will engender a sense of national pride from Land’s End to John interactivity in packaging O’Groats. The culture secretary Jeremy Hunt went so far as to say it was his mission design to make sure that this will be ‘everyone’s Games’. Yet a week before the opening ceremony, organisers’ leaden handling of communica- david cook, solicitor and tions, marketing and security has imbued in many of us a sense of scepticism where cyber expert, pannone there should be excitement. reviews six high-profile sites to see if they are compliant A BBC survey revealed a troubling feeling of apathy towards London 2012 for those in with the changes to the EU the regions, highlighting that most people believe the Games will mainly benefit the capital cookie directive and not the rest of the UK. Some 74 per cent said the rest of the UK would not benefit, with Scots and those in Wales, south west and northern England most likely to agree. gordon young, What was that about everyone’s Games? editor oversees the In Scotland, organisers have reluctantly resorted to literally giving away tickets to the publishing of The Drum’s website and magazine Olympic football matches at Hampden because they can’t sell them. It is little wonder there is a lack of public sentiment when we see an East London hous- gordon.young@thedrum.com ing block being converted into a military watchtower, replete with missiles on the roof, against the wishes of its residents. The images of snipers guarding the Olympic Stadium stephen lepitak, news editor oversees news certainly capture the imagination – but for all the wrong reasons. output and sources industry Then there’s the draconian marketing legislation which does nothing for either the public news and analysis image of the Games or the man in the street’s impression of our industry. We’ve written stephen.lepitak@thedrum.com at length in recent weeks about the heavy-handed laws that forbid anyone but the official sponsors from using innocuous terms such as gold, summer and London in their adver- thomas o’neill, tising campaigns during the Olympics. assistant editor It has since emerged that caterers in and around the Olympic Stadium will not be able brings together the best to serve chips to fans due to the terms of London 2012’s sponsorship deal with McDon- recent creative campaigns for The Works ald’s. You can have fish and chips, or fries from McDonald’s, but a bag of chips on their thomas@thedrum.com own is out of the question. And how’s this for timing. Last week it was discovered that the private security firm G4S ishbel macleod, reporter did not have enough staff to fulfil its contract and protect the Olympic venues. This week reports on marketing and hundreds of uniformed officers took to Britain’s streets with a brief to clamp down on any media news, and manages The Drum’s social media accounts attempts at ambush marketing. The tabloids have dubbed this travelling squad ‘the brand police’. Is it any wonder people can be cynical about marketing? ishbel.macleod@thedrum.com As unearthed by the Index on Censorship, those of us who write anything but loving praise for the Games must not – repeat must not – include a link to the site in our articles. katie mcquater, “No such link shall portray us... in a derogatory or otherwise objectionable manner,” the staff writer assists with magazine production and online small print reads. Good luck enforcing that one. feature content It is because of such mishaps and meddling that many of us already feel weary about an event that is yet to begin. Thankfully, the Olympics, judged as a stunning sporting katie.mcquater@thedrum.com spectacle alone, should shake us from our slumber with the quality of competition on gillian west, reporter show. It is a sporting event after all. reports on marketing and Our politicians and officials may promise national pride, but it is patently obvious that media news, industry trends the only people we can truly expect to deliver on that promise are the athletes themselves. and statistics gillian.west@thedrum.com john glenday, reporter keeps abreast of the latest goings on in the world of social media Cameron Clarke, Opinion Editor john.glenday@thedrum.com cameron.clarke@thedrum.comPublisher/Editor: Gordon Young Associate Editor: Richard Draycott Assistant Editor: Thomas O’Neill News Editor: Stephen Lepitak Opinion Editor: Cameron Clarke Staff Writer: Katie McQuater Reporters: Ishbel Macleod, GillianWest Business Development Director: Liz Hamilton Business Development Manager: James McGowan Directory Sales: Victoria Swan Recruitment Sales: Tehmeena Latif Marketing & Subscriptions: Ayush KejriwalDesign & Production Director: Nick Creed Design/Production: Amanda Dewar, Dane Brown Events Director: Lynn Lester Events Manager: Katy ThomsonManaging Director: Diane Young Head of London Operations: Andy Oakes Head Office: 4th Floor, Mercat Building, 26 Gallowgate, Glasgow G1 5AB Tel: 0141 552 5858 Fax: 0141 559 6050Original Design: stand Printed by: Stephens & George MagazinesTHE DRUM is published by Carnyx Group Limited. The publishers, authors and printers cannot accept liability for any errors or omissions. Any transparencies or artwork will be accepted at owner’s risk. All rights reserved. On no accountmay any part of this publication be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the copyright holder and publisher, application for which should be made to the publisher. © carnyx group limited 2012 ISSN 2046-0635
    • 06AGENDA www.thedrum.com JUL.20.12 THE DRUM marketing dealsHas financial turmoil affected Lloyds AcquisitionsTSB’s Olympics sponsorship strategy? updateThe Drum speaks to Sally Hancock, director of Olympic marketing forLloyds TSB, about the bank’s marketing activity in the run up to the Games.The Olympic Torch is set to reach Aegis Media is set to be sold to Jap-its final destination, with the open- anese media buying and planninging ceremony for the London 2012 agency Dentsu. Aegis has announcedOlympic and Paralympic Games that it has agreed on the terms of ajust days away. While touring with recommended cash offer for 30.5 perthe flame, Sally Hancock, direc- cent of Aegis’ ordinary share capital.tor of Olympic marketing for offi- The deal values each Aegis share atcial banking partner of the Games, £2.40, a 48 per cent premium on theirLloyds TSB and Bank of Scotland, closing price of £1.62 on 11 July, andspoke to The Drum about its activ- values the entire business at £3,164m.ity building up to the Games. Dentsu has immediately purchased One of the first decisions made by 15 per cent of the firm and has agreedthe bank was to develop three objec- to conditionally purchase a further 15.5tives, which have remained in place per cent.over the five year journey, and which, Aegis directors will now unanimouslyinsisted Hancock, were all treated with recommend that shareholders approveequal importance. the deal. These were in the form of questions authentic and appropriate for a bank fraction’ of the total price paid for theto answer: what would the sponsor- to do,” replied Hancock when asked rights. Cost was also saved throughship do for the brand? What would it about her views on this. “I was very a cull of unconnected sponsorships,do for employee motivation and pride? clear from the go that we wouldn’t alongside other revenue being divert-And what would it do to drive incre- be distributing torch bearer places ed into the Games, such as the hospi-mental business? to people within the organisation by tality budget for the business banking She said that all three have re- virtue of their status. That was fully arm of the bank being diverted throughported good results, and having ac- understood and completely accepted. the Games too.quired HBOS since, while seeing the Equally I wanted all of our torch bear- As to how restrictive the guidelinescompany grow to around 100,000 ers to be relevant and credible and in- are for non-sponsors, most notablyemployees, the sponsorship has also line with LOCOG’s ambition for there small business people, Hancock be- BBH is to be acquired by Publicisbeen used internally to bring together to be people who have made a differ- lieves that a pragmatic view should be Groupe, which has held a minoritya large staff working across what was ence within their community.” taken of each case. stake in the agency for a decade.seen as two disparate brands. Asked whether the turmoil within the “Really, it is about having fun and The agency, which employs around Of the total 8,000 torch bearers, financial climate affected the sponsor- celebrating. It is all within a certain 1,000 people, will become fully ownedLloyds TSB had 1,350 placements, ship strategy itself, Hancock said that degree of reason and good humour. by Publicis, which has held a 49 perthe same number as other torch relay she expected that it would: “I genu- Were 300 people to show up wear- cent stake in the agency since 2002.sponsors Coca-Cola and Samsung. inely thought at some point I’d get ing Barclays football shirts and sit in a Following the acquisition, BBH hasThe expectation that all of these bear- a call that said we’d need to scale it cluster within the stadium then yes, I’d installed a new senior managementers would be local heroes, however, back, we need to do less, we need to want that seen to, but are we going to team, with Alexandre Gama chosen tocaused controversy with US music consider how we might get out of the be concerned about one bloke walk- succeed Sir John Hegarty as worldwidestar Will.i.am involved in the relay at contract but that never happened.” ing in with a football shirt that says chief creative officer.one stage, alongside a Russian editor As to why the budget was never al- Barclays on it? Of course not. That Founding partners Nigel Bogle andinvited by Coca-Cola. tered, she explained that it was due doesn’t make sense. We should be Hegarty will both remain active on client “I have been very clear all the way to initial agreements to phase the confident enough in our own activity business, however they will transferthrough this process that whatever the activation budget over the five years, not to worry about those things and I their executive responsibilities to thebank did had to be very credible and which she says meant the deal was ‘a am confident enough.” management team. helping you stand out in your field 0151 227 1777 // uspcreative.com // uspcreative TM
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com AGENDA07 marketingHow might the independent agency sector beimpacted by the domino effect of acquisitions?The marketing and digital landscape has undergone significant change of late. The Drum’s StephenLepitak takes a look at how independents might be affected as a result of the latest tide of acquisitions.The UK marketing and digital sector good time to invest for marketing ser-is experiencing a wind of change. A vices agencies.number of high level acquisitions have According to Tina Judic, managingtaken place in recent weeks, spanning director of Found, the marketplace isa range of sectors, not least digital. buoyant, but it is clear that digital is now These include WPP’s £540m acquisi- leading the way, where unique specialismtion of AKQA; Chime Communications’ is demanded in order to most effectivelydisposal of the Bell Pottinger business to ensure brand targeting and engagement:its own directors; LBi’s admission to ac- “Should smaller independent agenciesquisition talks with Omnicom; Yammer feel threatened by this? I don’t think so,”entering the Microsoft fold; adam&eve said Judic. “If anything, such moves –being acquired by DDB Worldwide; yet to be shown to be successful – are Photo: koocborAegis agreeing to a cash offer from a thumbs up that we’ve got somethingDentsu, and advertising monolith BBH that the big guys want – and in such abecoming wholly owned by Publicis fast-paced market, this is always goingGroupe. to be the case.” But what does this mean for the inde- Managing director of performancependent sector watching these compa- marketing company AffiliateTraction, AKQA and potentially LBi, Gall contin- their success and by their success, wenies join the network fold? The views to Nicky McShane, who has joined the ued: “There’s a hugely powerful sector have a massive vested interest in makingthese deals seem to indicate that some company to lead its entry into the UK and between creative, digital and media things work. Independents, I suspect,have been initiated to resuscitate the European marketplace, believes that the which is really critical to the needs of cli- are faring relatively well because clientsholding company’s flagging offer, while acquisitions support the importance of ents, is very demonstrable and is trans- see the value of that.”others plug a skillset gap. independent agencies: “Specialism and forming the model quite rapidly.” Mendelsohn believes that the tide of Douglas McCabe, media analyst for creativity are key commodities now and As to what it means for independent acquisitions has caused a domino effectEnders Analysis, said that the direction the bigger network’s templated service companies, Tarek Nseir, CEO of TH_NK, in creating other deals.is clear: “The larger agencies are acquir- isn’t good enough. When you specialise another independent digital player, said “Having these numbers of deals in aing the creative and technical skills they you become a complete expert. That be- that consolidation will immediately push pretty short period of time shows thatneed as part of their service solution in comes impossible when you generalise.” the company higher when it comes to this is a growth sector, it’s an excitingthe future. A certain independent ‘edge’ Dale Gall, CEO of independent digital independent lists, while also “liberating” area and that is good for all agencies ofis clearly part of such an asset, as brands marketing agency Profero Group, also talent to good agencies: “We are finding all sizes.”look to engage audiences with tech- believes that a generalised offering, in that clients who are looking for very strong Ultimately though, the industry hasniques beyond traditional advertising.” the current environment, is going to be core competencies in digital strategy and proven that clients will always want to Nicola Mendelsohn, chairman of Kar- all the more difficult for agencies without innovation are also looking for the ability to work with exciting agencies that offermarama and chair of the IPA, believes global scale: “You either have to have control action and delivery.” original and effective creative solutions,this to be an “exciting time” for the indus- global reach or you have to be pretty Nicky Unsworth, who heads up BJL, a no matter what their size or reach. Bril-try: “Industries that have momentum and niche in the digital space. If you’re just a member of independent marketing net- liant work can be produced by any com-growth indicates positive signs, which creative shop in the digital space, where work, Tribe Global, believes that now is a pany, independent or in the form of acan only be a good thing.” increasingly some of the above-the-line good time for agencies to aim for growth, network owned agency, such was the Mendelsohn added that growth in agencies are doing good ideas in that describing good agencies as offering meteoric rise of adam&eve as a recentmarketing spend, indicated by the pre- space, unless you’ve got scale and the ‘strong and agile strategic thinking’ and example. Should that exciting creativevious Bellwether Report for Q1, shows true ability to prove that you can deliver using partnerships in order to strengthen come from an independent house how-signs that confidence among market- that to some point-of-difference, then that offer and grow reach. ever, it’s only a matter of time before theers had risen. Now, it would seem, after you’re going to struggle.” “Clients like the ‘owner-run-and-man- networks come calling.a couple of years of belt tightening, is a Commenting on the acquisitions of aged’ model because our success is So... who’s next? Colour print comes alive when its personalised. Tell us your name and your favourite mms mms mms mms mms colour and well bring it to life for YOU. mms s s Oliver Oliver Graham mm Vanessa mm Yasmin Brad Ric k Iain 0141 950 2222
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    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com AGENDA09 media mediaThe new generation: What is the BBC won’t mind if older listenersfuture for Radio 1 post-Moyles? leave with MoylesAfter the announcement Mike Williamson, head of radio atthat Chris Moyles is Carat, thinks Chris Moyles’ exit from the Radio 1 Breakfast Show signalsto leave the Radio an effort from the station to recon-1 Breakfast Show nect with a younger audience. Here’sin September, The what he had to say... “Radio 1’s announcement that ChrisDrum caught up with Moyles will leave its flagship show informer Radio 1 DJ Gary September isn’t a small step change;Davies, now running this is a bold long term shift in its audi- ence strategy.branded content Controller Ben Cooper has beenagency Upfront, to find under pressure to bring the averageout what Moyles’ exit age down as its current average listener age is 32. Moyles’ eight year run as themeans for the future longest serving Radio 1 breakfast pre-of a station looking for senter ever has taken the audience tooa younger audience. old. He leaves with an audience of 7.1m weekly listeners. It was expected that Greg JamesThe BBC recently announced that And therein lies the problem. At 38, In a commercial radio world, everything would be his replacement. He would haveChris Moyles would be leaving the the age gap between Moyles and his is about audience figures whereas with been the safe choice – ensuring some ofRadio 1 Breakfast Show in Septem- intended audience was becoming ever the BBC and Radio 1 it’s about getting Moyles’ loyal listeners stay with Radio 1.ber. Gary Davies left Radio 1 in 1993 greater. In a report published last No- good audience figures but also meeting Grimshaw was not seen as a favouriteafter more than a decade as a DJ at vember, the BBC Trust found that the your target demographic as well.” as he currently hosts evening specialistthe station. station needed to work harder to attract New breakfast host Nick Grimshaw, shows. But his credentials for attracting Chris Moyles has had an impressive more under 30s, with the average lis- 27, already presents a late night show a much younger audience are clear andeight year reign on the Radio 1 break- tener of Moyles’ show being 32. on Radio 1 as well as Channel 4’s youth he will deliver against this objective.fast slot, attracting over seven million Davies, who presented Radio 1 lunch- slot, T4. But will the new addition to With Grimshaw and James on thelisteners to the show each day. So one time show ‘The Bit In The Middle’ during breakfast radio bring in the station’s key two flagship Radio 1 shows, the BBC’smight argue that Moyles was still very the 1980s, was part of a similar replace- target demographic as well as maintain- long term strategy is clear: it is aligningmuch at the top of his game in a job that ment of old presenters with new, young- ing the audience figures? its schedule to attract the younger endhas not traditionally lasted more that a er ones upon the arrival of axe-wielding Davies said: “When someone’s been of its 15-29 year old target market.couple of years for other DJs. station controller Matthew Bannister in there for a very long time and gathered The short term is likely to see loyal “I think that he’s had an amazing run 1993. As such, the resignation of 38- a very loyal following there will initially be Moyles listeners switch to other sta-on the Breakfast Show,” Gary Davies year-old Moyles comes as no surprise an effect on listening figures. Obviously tions. But this is what the BBC wantstold The Drum. “It’s the longest serving to him. the idea is that Nick will win them over and needs to happen. Will the 30+ yearbreakfast show on Radio 1, which is a “I think Radio 1 has always done that as soon as he can and try and build on old Moyles listeners switch to Chrisreal achievement. throughout the years,” Davies said. “It’s what Chris has achieved over the last Evans’ Radio 2 show? Will they move “But the thing about Radio 1 is that an interesting dilemma that it has be- eight years. But my guess is probably, over to commercial stations and irrev-it’s a youth market station and I think cause obviously it doesn’t want to lose initially, there will be a small dip. erent breakfast DJs such as Christianeverybody who works there knows the audience but it has to stay within the “[Grimshaw] is a really good jockey. O’Connell’s Absolute Radio show?that you’re not going to be there for- remits of the station youth wise. It’s not He’s funny, he’s chatty, he’s got an ex- The first set of listening figures for theever. There are exceptions, I suppose, like Radio 2 where you can potentially cellent knowledge of music. It will be in- new breakfast show host will not be re-with Pete Tong and John Peel, but as be a DJ until the day you die. teresting to see him in a situation where leased until early 2013, leaving time fora mainstream jockey you pretty much “On Radio 1 as you get to 40, you’re he is playing more commercial music the BBC to do a huge amount of mar-know that the closer you get to 40 your getting a bit old for your audience re- than he is doing at night time. But time keting across its platforms to minimisetime is going to be limited.” gardless of how good your figures are. will tell. Who knows.” any drops in the listener base.” forever: INSPIRING forever ADVISING PIONEERING & doing things SURPRISING differently forevercreative.com Forever-DrumBannerAd.indd 1 30/05/2012 16:14
    • 10AGENDA www.thedrum.com JUL.20.12 THE DRUM digitalHigh-profile breaches of cookie law legislationThe EU’s Privacy and Electronic Communications Information Commissioner’s Office Mail OnlineDirective, or cookie law, came into force in the UK www.ico.gov.uk www.dailymail.co.ukin May. But are websites complying? David Cook, It would be very embarrassing if the This website is supposed to be the arbiter of the new cookie regime most viewed newspaper site in thesolicitor and cyber expert at law firm Pannone, was itself breaching the legislation. world. Needless to say then, thereviews six high-profile sites to find out. However, it does not appear to be. amount of viewers per day must be Its website uses a discrete toolbar at massive. It is therefore extraordinary the top of the screen, which is set to to see that it does not appear to not accept cookies unless a person have made any changes at all. The makes a choice by positively accept- foot of the page has a link to their ing them. Its explanation of which privacy policy, which itself appears cookies they use and why is also compliant. However, to consider the thoroughly explained. subject of opt-in, you have to go to a further link, which does a decent job Channel 4 of explaining the position. www.channel4.com As I see it, the issue with this site Channel 4 has used a status bar at is that it seeks to rely on implied the top of the screen, which requests consent – the user continues to use a decision on whether cookies are ac- the site and so it is implied that they cepted or not. It also explains which consent to its cookie policy. The cookies are used and why. It has ICO guidance states that sites need utilised a fairly non-intrusive method to gain a positive indication that which appears fully compliant. users understand and agree to theThere has been a muted response in a site uses and would be the exception changes, most commonly obtainedthe media to the changes to the law on rather than the norm. Examples of strictly The Telegraph by asking the user to tick a box tothe use of cookies, but they are poten- necessary cookies are therefore those www.telegraph.co.uk indicate that they do indeed consenttially far reaching. which help the site remember your choic- This site has taken a somewhat to the new terms. The ICO also The issue for businesses is that the es when making an online purchase. hybrid approach – there is a fairly no- states that any attempt to gain con-Information Commissioner’s Office can The ICO has recommended that web- ticeable toolbar at the top, explaining sent that relies on users’ ignoranceimpose fines of up to £500,000. Whether site owners take the following steps: about “privacy and cookies”, but this about what they are agreeing to isfines of that amount will ever be imposed 1. Review what type of cookies the site is fails to explicitly request consent. The unlikely to be compliant. With thatis another matter, but the public naming using and how they are using them. information that a user is directed to in mind, I simply cannot see howand shaming that would result from even 2. Consider how intrusive the use of these is fairly thorough, but it nevertheless this site is compliant.a minor breach could be a public relations cookies is. does not appear to have complieddisaster for companies. 3. Decide what method of consent will be properly. The suggestion of the ICO Department for Transport The amended legislation is only a best in the circumstances. to have a tick-box has gone unheed- www.dft.gov.uksubtle change but it does have an effect. The ICO recognised the difficulties that ed. Given the setup of the toolbar, Apparently, government websitesIt now states that cookies cannot be used could be caused by these changes and the addition of a tick-box would be have been slow to update their sitesunless the person has already consented. agreed to delay enforcing them for a 12 incredibly easy and it is unclear why to take into account the changesEssentially, this means that it is now an month period, to give UK businesses it has not utilised this method. to the cookie law. But the ICO isopt-in system rather than opt-out. enough time to resolve any issues arising. The cost of adding a tick-box to supposed to have sent a letter of The new rules are fairly simple and de- That deadline expired on 25 May and, that toolbar would be relatively small, warning to 75 of the UK’s mostsigning a website with them in mind from predictably, nobody was ready. Cue many when compared to the original cost popular websites asking for them toscratch would be pretty easy. However, rushed website changes. of implementing the toolbar itself. prove within 28 days how they arethe problem is that most websites have Despite more than a month having- The cost of adding the tick-box moving towards compliance with thenot been redesigned for this purpose, passed since this legislation became when compared to the maximum new legislation. The Department forpresumably because of the cost and loss properly active, it is clear that many sites fine that the ICO could impose, of Transport is one of those sites.of sales while the site is down. Most sites have either misunderstood the legislation £500,000, is infinitesimally small. It is therefore fairly worrying totherefore simply shoe-horned in a pop-up or are flagrantly disregarding it. When the note that the DFT website appearsbox or some other method of compliance, ICO has stated that only the most prolific The Financial Times unchanged. It has a cookie option onwhich tend to be completely at odds with offenders in the most serious of breaches www.ft.com the site, in amongst the many otherthe aesthetic of the rest of the site. will receive a fine, there appears little in- The Financial Times website utilises options. Clicking on this also allows This consent rule applies to every type centive to properly implement the chang- a pop-up box. The rest of the screen you to consider the brief explanationof cookie that is not ‘strictly necessary’. es when a token attempt will do for now. greys out and the pop-up, whilst as to how to amend the browserMany website owners originally saw this But at some point the ICO will have to pretty intrusive, does the job. This settings to control cookies manually.as a get-out and planned to suggest that bare its teeth. The directive is clear and method forces the user to immedi- However, this also appears contraryall of their cookies were strictly necessary. the government has stated it will comply ately consent – or not – to the use of to the spirit of the legislation and,However, the European legislators have with it. The ICO, which has been chosen cookies, which are properly explained. being as the ICO singled out this site,stated that a cookie that is strictly nec- to police the issue, will have to be seen The FT website therefore appears fully it will be interesting to see how it isessary should make up only a very small to take it seriously, even if website owners compliant with the changes. received.percentage of the number of cookies are currently not.
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com AGENDA11 social media EVENTSBBC’s Cellan-Jones talks VirtualBagel“We’d been told by various people Following a Facebook investigation which saw Rewarding effective social mediathat Facebook’s adverts either weren’t campaigns and open to agenciesdelivering good results or were deliv- the BBC question the value of Facebook ‘likes’ and clients based in the UK, there areering lots and lots of ‘customers’ or and advertising investment for brands, The Drum 27 categories to enter in the Sociallikes which were of little value and we Buzz Awards 2012 including newwanted to put that to the test,” BBC spoke to BBC technology correspondent Rory categories In-house Client Team;technology correspondent Rory Cel- Cellan-Jones, the man behind ‘VirtualBagel’. User Generated Content; Crisislan-Jones told The Drum. Management; and Use of Insight/ From this Cellan-Jones and a team at Monitoring. Judged by individualsthe BBC decided to test the theory by with extensive experience andcreating the Facebook page ‘VirtualBa- knowledge in social media, includinggel’ to investigate the value of Facebook @VincentBoon @NickJonesCOIadvertising and ‘likes’. @sedgebeswick and @jeremywaite. He explained the concept of ‘VirtualBa- www.socialbuzzawards.comgel’ was little more than a picture and a @buzz_awardsslightly daft slogan; it wasn’t promoted in Entry Deadline: 1 Augustany way except via Facebook and widelytargeted the US, the UK and a numberof Middle East and Asian countries. Injust 24 hours ‘VirtualBagel’ had garnered1,600 likes and just a short time later thefictitious brand had amassed an onlinefollowing of 3,000 fans. The findings of this investigation, ac-cording to Cellan-Jones, call into ques- wasn’t getting any real return from being an example of poor advertising practicetion the value of advertising on the social on the site. and brands will get better results andmedia site: Cellan-Jones told us he had also better returns if they target their adverts “Advertisers are paying for a click spoken to a “major British brand, who correctly.from somebody who doesn’t really exist didn’t want to be named, but who said Worryingly for Facebook, which hasand the question we put to Facebook is exactly the same; we can’t justify spend- recently gone public, Cellan-Jones’ Enter Cream Midlands or Creamwhat are you doing to police that? Is it a ing money on adverts on Facebook. You findings, in his words, show “you can Yorkshire and prove great workserious issue?” might want to be on there, you might achieve an awful lot on Facebook for is being produced in the regions. According to online statistics, around want to have an interesting page and your brand without ever spending a Check the websites to see eligiblesix per cent of Facebook profiles are engage with people, but spending money penny, which is a big worry for Face- postcodes.bogus and recently General Motors on adverts seems pretty pointless.” book as it needs to go on building rev- midlands.creamawards.co.uk(GM) pulled its $10 million advertising Facebook and social media consul- enue quite substantially if it’s to justify its yorkshire.creamawards.co.ukportfolio from Facebook, claiming it tants have responded by saying this is valuation.” Entry deadline: 27 July social media5 steps for making social B2B work Entries are now open for the MiAwards. To view categories and details on how to enter visit1. Understanding Pete Wood, account manager at digital marketing miawards.meYou wouldn’t buy a house without Entry deadline: 7 Septemberchecking out the area and the neigh- agency Steak, offers up five top tips to help makebours first, so why would you start your B2B social work for your business.social presence without understand-ing as much as possible about what is the same thorough checks you’d put in 4. Cooperationgoing on around your business? place if you were sending out analysis There’s no point being in the social to a client. It’s an extension of the meta- space just existing. You want to give the2. Resource phorical shop window. people interacting with your content anIf you don’t have a dedicated market- experience. The only way you can doing department, don’t put someone too 3. Buy-in this is by sharing the knowledge you The Creative Out of Home Awardssenior in charge of the project. They’ll You need to have buy-in for the right have about your product or service. in Association with Clear Channelalways have bigger priorities and the reasons. Too many businesses enter is now open for entries. For moresocial project will tend to find itself side- the space tentatively with the attitude it 5. Goals information and to enter, visittracked. won’t work or it’s a waste of money. If Don’t just make your goals around hard creativeoutofhomeawards.com In the same vein, don’t pick some- you head into social media with that at- targets like followers or fans. Look for Entry deadline: 31 Augustone too junior. Social content needs titude, it simply won’t succeed. business social goals.
    • 12PITCH www.thedrum.com JUL.20.12 THE DRUMPitch news and reviewsMars is in talks with a number of UK Plenty of updates on the pitch front, including Tesco’s £100m ad reviewshops as it looks to put together aroster of consumer agencies to devel- drawing to a close and B&Q seeking a shop for its £40m account.op more innovative and creative cam-paigns and build its profile in chocolateand non-confectionery categories. hot pitch Visit Wales is reviewing its commu-nications planning account through NSPCC reviewsthe Government Procurement Service.The account is currently serviced by £5m fundraisingArena Media. ad account B&Q is set to review its £40m adaccount, with eight agencies, includ- The National Society for the Preventioning incumbent McCann London, lining of Cruelty to Children is looking for anup to pitch for the DIY retailer’s adver- agency to handle its £5m advertising ac-tising business. count across its fundraising business. Ben Sherman is seeking a shop to The children’s charity has issued an RFIhandle a new advertising campaign to agencies, with an appointment expect-for its upcoming collection. The Brit- ed later in the year. Incumbent Rapp hasish clothing brand currently handles worked with the charity for 12 years.advertising in-house. The account will focus on increasing Vitaminwater, the Coca-Cola fundraising activity, traditionally consist-owned water brand, has called a pitch ing of direct mail and direct response TV.for its European advertising account. The charity is also reviewing its media Huawei, the Chinese telecoms planning and buying account. Rapp isgiant, is on the hunt for an agency to also incumbent on DR media, and Ze-run a corporate brand strategy brief. nithOptimedia incumbent on ATL media. Direct Line Group’s review of itsdirect marketing business is drawingto a close, with a decision imminent.MRM Meteorite, Kitcatt Nohr Digitas accounts under reviewand OgilvyOne are in the running. Marriott’s pan-European advertis- Advertiser Account Worthing review is under way, with a shortlistof agencies including Anomaly, AMP B&Q Advertising £40mLondon, Partners Andrews Aldridge Ben Sherman Advertising n/aand The Red Brick Road pitching for Direct Line Group Direct marketing n/athe account. Tesco is holding final pitches this Huawei Corporate brand strategy n/aweek for its £100m advertising ac- Marriott Pan-European advertising n/a count, with VCCP, Wieden+Kennedy Mars Consumer roster n/aand TBWAManchester competing for NSPCC Advertising £5mthe account. RAC has grown its pitch list for its RAC Advertising n/aadvertising account to now include Tesco Advertising £100mincumbent Rapier, Grey, Saatchi Visit Wales Communications planning n/a& Saatchi, Rainey Kelly CampbellRoalfe/Y&R, Bartle Bogle Hegarty and Vitaminwater Advertising n/aAdam & Eve/DDB. NEED THE RIGHT AGENCY, YESTERDAY? Fast track your agency review and stay focused on the day job. Visit www.recommendedagencies.com and call 0845 004 5626
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com PEOPLE13 Anyone can find you people…180 Amsterdamhires Hall as Mecca Bingo brings People on the move...creative director in Morrisons’ Condon Blast Radius has appointed Lucille Moreau 180 Amsterdam has ap- Mecca Bingo has hired James Con- to its expanding pointed Graeme Hall as don, previously marketing director Amsterdam office in creative director, with at Morrisons, as its new brand mar- the role of client director on the Hall relocating to the keting director. pan-European Michelin account. Netherlands after nearly Condon had been marketing di-three years with Y&R New York. rector at Morrisons since September Starcom MediaVest Group has At Y&R Hall worked on campaigns 2011, after six months of holding the brought in Alfred Cheng from MECfor the likes of Dell and VH1 and was post on an interim basis. Before join- Hong Kong as its regional directorcreative director for Virgin Atlantic. Pre- ing the supermarket chain he was for Hong Kong.viously Hall spent five years at DDB Lon- chief operating officer at Lebara Mo- channel-based structure to a brand-don working on campaigns for brands bile, and he has also held senior roles based one, creating a single Mecca Euro RSCG PR has hired Steveincluding Marmite and Harvey Nichols. at Tesco and Wal-Mart. brand team so that we can collectively Marinker as MD. Marinker’s new Mecca Bingo managing director focus on delivering a fantastic experi- role includes business development Mark Jones said: “Recent customer ence for our customers no matter how and overseeing the directors.Pont returns to insights reveal that it doesn’t matter whether our customers play online, they choose to play. “With his extensive senior level re- LBi has appointedWieden+Kennedy in clubs, on their smartphone or iPad – as far as they are concerned they tail and digital experience, James will play a key role in ensuring that Mecca Greg Georgiades from JWT as UK client Jordi Pont has made a re- are playing at Mecca. For that reason, continues to lead the industry across partner, where he will turn to Wieden+Kennedy we took the decision to move from a all platforms.” head up relationships Amsterdam to take up on flagship accounts such as Asda, the post of group ac- RBS and E.ON. count director on Hei-nken and GE. Pont rejoins the agency after twoyears as managing director of DoubleY- Pure Agency appoints TMW has promoted Daren Kay, its joint executive creative director, to the newly created role of director ofou Madrid. He first joined the Amster-dam agency in 2008 as account direc-tor, leading the Nike Football account Omoluabi as UK VP innovation. Enjoy Digital hasand the ‘Write the Future’ campaign. announced the Pure Agency has announced the ap- appointment of Kristal pointment of Femi Omoluabi as UK Ireland as strategyMcCann London vice president. Omoluabi, who joins from Manning director.appoints COO Gottlieb OMD, is charged with estab- Total Media has announced the lishing the European agency in the UK, appointment of Celine Saturnino as McCann London has maintaining and growing of the UK arm head of digital. Saturnino joins from made two internal pro- and identifying key new business op- MPG. motions, with Jamie Co- portunities. pas taking on the role of He said: “I’m thrilled to be joining pany’s expansion into the UK. Since Fetch Media has appointed Matt chief operating officer Pure Agency at such an exciting time. its creation in 2008, Pure Agency has Champion as media serviceswhile Simon Hill has been announced Mobile marketing is the fastest growing rapidly become a powerhouse in Eu- director.as head of account management. and most innovative area of marketing rope and is synonymous with success Previously client services director, Co- at the moment, so the opportunities for and results. The company is a powerful Ignite has appointedpas will take on the COO role for McCann expansion in the UK are immense.” entrant to the market that will certainly Peter Smith asLondon immediately, and will continue to Omoluabi reports to CEO Christophe shake things up in the UK. We are very marketing manager,lead key client relationships, while also Leon, who said: “We’re very excited much looking forward to working with with Smith joiningaiming for operational excellency across to have Mr Omoluabi join us at Pure Mr Omoluabi who is as enthusiastic as after two years atthe agency. Agency and to have him lead the com- we are about launching in Britain.” iD Experimental. …we’ll find you talent. Creative / Account Handling / PR recruitment pitchconsultants.co.uk / info@pitchconsultants.co.uk / 0121 270 4080
    • 14m&c Saatchi www.thedrum.com JUL.20.12 THE DRUMsimplICITYOF THOUGHTIn the complex world of advertising, creativity is oftenoverlooked. Mairi Clark catches up with M&C Saatchi’s ‘quietman’ Jeremy Sinclair to discuss brutally simple thinking.H e has been described as the ‘shad- say “what do you do?”, you mention them and they tive,” he says. “The whole idea of procurement, I don’t owy partner’ of M&C Saatchi, and the know them,” he says. know whether that’s making advertising a) cheaper or ‘quiet man of advertising’. When I finally Saatchi & Saatchi was formed in 1970, and Sinclair b) more effective.” meet Jeremy Sinclair, chairman of M&C was a stalwart until the heady times of the 90s. Mau- The ironic thing about Sinclair’s involvement with the Saatchi, I’m astonished that we haven’t rice and Charles Saatchi were unfavoured by the new Conservatives is that if he wasn’t in advertising, he’dmet before. After nearly twenty years in the industry, management board of the parent company of Saatchi be in politics. “I’ve always believed if you go into poli-and almost 50 years for him, it’s surprising. & Saatchi and when the idea of ousting them was tics, you should do something before,” he says. “So But that’s the attraction of Sinclair. He admits that mooted in 1994, Sinclair was not for turning – to quote I wasn’t completely waylaid. Besides we do a lot ofhe lies below the ‘celebrity’ level of the ad industry, but his favoured party’s line. politics as an agency.”seems to be relishing his new-found status as an author “We told the board not to get rid of Maurice and It shouldn’t be surprising that Sinclair’s love of phi-of advertising literature after the publication of Brutal Charles, as did Mars and British Airways,” he says. losophy has influenced the Brutal Simplicity Of Thought.Simplicity Of Thought. “Then when they did, we [Sinclair, Bill Gallacher and He teaches his other passion outside creative advertis- “Creativity is ignored,” he says. “Things come in and David Kershaw] thought ‘we’re not going to spend the ing twice a week at London’s School of Economic Sci-out of fashion. Most types of advertising are far too next five years making up for a mistake we told people ence. “The philosophy that I teach is to be useful, andcomplicated. Most people who have an understandingof the simplicity of the world become Steve Jobs.” The book, which has now been replicated in severallanguages, has evolved into a competition for young “most types of advertising are far too complicated.creatives to win an internship in M&C Saatchi’s offices Most people who have an understanding of thein London’s Golden Square. The book looks at Sinclair’s simplicity of the world become Steve Jobs.”belief in ‘inspiration being both verbal and visual’, so thecompetition has rules which relate just that. not to make. We’re going to start an agency.’ not just about mind expanding,” he says. “That’s heavily The ethos of the book remains at the centre of what “Then we had a phone call from Maurice and Charles influenced the book. Part of it is about looking at thingsthe Saatchi brothers evoked, but Sinclair has a slightly who wanted to join us.” and then looking again to see just what they are.”lower-key past than them. The agency has since gone from strength to strength, The book has been a great success. The agency ran He stumbled into advertising via a stint in Paris. “I with this new book – and competition – being another a course for staff – led by Sinclair – and then startedsaw an ad in The Times for Watford Art School,” he injection of vigour. compiling ideas for a second edition. The whole pro-says. “So I wrote in and said I’m the kind of person that “Oddly enough, the idea for doing the book was cess was driven by what would work as an ad.you want. I wrote, actually to all the advertisers at the Moray’s,” Sinclair says, referring to Moray MacLennan, “We edited it down by a completely arbitrary andtime, just to see what kind of response I’d get.” the agency’s worldwide CEO. “I nicked the idea off egocentric manner,” Sinclair says. “There are rules. You A trip to Algeria delayed his journey to Watford – a him, and just did it. When he suggested it, I said ‘that’s have to have a very simple picture, you have to have awell known incubator for advertising gurus – but after a great idea, now you sit back, have a rest and I’ll do question on the right-hand side and the copy has to beborrowing the money from his mum to do the entry the book’. So then we just took it and did it.” four to six lines. You could end up with the discovery oftest, he got in. Sinclair has a passion for creativity; one that has led penicillin or nuclear power. It mustn’t become a list of After joining what was then Cramer Saatchi in 1967, to him being lauded by his peers. Being in the industry inventions, it has to become ideas.”he was responsible for overseeing possibly two of the for so long he’s clearly seen changes. The question of The project, if you can call it that, has yet to come tomost famous ads of all time: The Pregnant Man for whether accountability is helping creativity or hindering fruition. “Well, the first thing that has to be done, longthe Health Education Council in 1969 and Labour Isn’t it is one that causes him some thought. before the work,” he says, “is that your strategy hasWorking for the Conservatives in the 1979 election. “Certainly clients know how every penny is being to be correct. What is supposed to be ‘brutal’ is your “In my view of the business, there are two adverts spent, much more than they ever did, and I would thinking. The first thing you’re supposed to be brutalwhich, when you can go to a dinner party and people question whether that’s making advertising more effec- with is yourself; to cut out all those irrelevant bits.”
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com m&c Saatchi15T
    • In designing Fenland we looked fora new way to create shapes in orderto help you create new designs.see more at typography.netEmail info@typography.net for afree limited edition sample book(a shortened pdf version can be downloaded at typography.net)Fenlandour new 14 font typeface
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com creative news17The Works To submit work to our creative round-up contact thomas@thedrum.comThe packaging for thefirst craft ale releasedby LittlePod has beendesigned by Aesop.LittlePod Vanilla Beer isa dark ale that infuseshoney and vanilla to createa ‘not overtly sweet flavour’.LittlePod tasked Aesop withdesigning packaging whichwould reflect the beer’s‘innate specialness’, ithas said. M-four, ManchesterTaxi Studio has created the city council’s in-houseidentity for Carlsberg’s new creative agency, hascider product Somersby. designed invites and aTaxi was also responsible promotional campaignfor creating the identity for for the opening ofSomersby in Denmark, which is the National Footballa separate product and brand. Museum in Manchester.The branding utilises a green The invites are red andsimilar to parent brand Carlsberg yellow cards which tellwhich it says is unique in a cider guests they have beencategory dominated by yellows ‘booked’ for the occasion.and blacks.
    • 18the works www.thedrum.com JUL.20.12 THE DRUM StudioLR has designed a book as part of Whatever gets you through the night, a new multimedia project created by Olivier award-winning theatre director Cora Bissett, Edinburgh band Swimmer One and playwright David Greig. Yesterday has unveiled a brand refresh with agency DixonBaxi to help change viewers’ perceptions of the factual TV channel. The channel looks to make its audience more diverse, with a new logo and set of idents to launch 24 July.
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com creative news19 Channel 4’s new channel 4seven, which will show the most popular content from the last seven days, has launched with identity by ManvsMachine with a distinctive corner wrap concept across the package. The idents were created to be similar to the ‘everyday location’ ones used by Channel 4, while at the same keep keeping its own identity. International design and style magazine, Wallpaper* has launched a new fragrance with German publisher Gerhard Steidl and fashion icon Karl Lagerfeld. The perfume captures the scent of freshly printed books and the packaging, designed by Lagerfeld, features a real book with a hidden cut out compartment to house the bottle.
    • 20tHe works www.thedrum.com JUL.20.12 tHe DrUM rob ricketts has designed a series of posters detailing how some of the most notable drum sequences were programmed using the roland tr- 808 Drum Machine. each sequence has been analysed and represented as to allow users to re-programme each sequence, key for key.creative agency Music has created the identity and graphics for the Britain creates 2012: Fashion & art collusion.
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com creative news21Daniel Britt has directed and animated an animation for the WMD AwarenessProgramme for its 1000 reasons campaign, devising a low budget solution tocreate a stop-motion animation. Build has designed a box set of Gary Hustwit directed documentary films, devising a system of abbreviating each film (He-Helvetica/Ob-Objectified/Ur-Urbanized) to give the box set an identity of its own.
    • 22packaging www.thedrum.com JUL.20.12 THE DRUMDon’t juststand there...entertain me!Steve Osborne of brand design consultancy Osborne Pikeconsiders how packaging is fast becoming its own advertising.T here was a time when the very idea of hance packaging communication, I didn’t find the point capable of enhancing the brand experience created packaging was new technology. Napoleon of consumption to be the best moment to take it all in. by packaging are springing up everywhere. Suremen is often credited with spawning the idea by Nor would I imagine is the point-of-sale. The thought transformed its cans into game controllers which, offering a prize to anyone who could find a of a Friday evening in Asda, dozens of smart shoppers when pointed at a webcam, let players face a range of way to preserve food for his much-travelled hovering smartphones over smart packaging, doesn’t adventurous challenges in a bid to win prizes.armies. Nicolas Appert won the 12,000 francs and feel like ‘augmented’ reality, more an inconvenient one. Dutch design graduate Niels van Hoof meanwhile hasmore or less invented the canning process. But sit me down in a comfy chair with a glossy maga- created an app called Taggie, intended to encourage Appert’s invention was all about functionality, but by zine and it’s another story. Ardaich water cleverly used children to access information on the origin, cultivation,the time packaging became widely available in the late augmented reality to illustrate its defining story of ‘the variety and nutritional values of various products.19th century it had started to take on a new role – re- water that whisky drinkers choose’. The AR-enhanced Brands will argue that this is exactly what the con-placing the people who previously mediated in the buying print ad dives beautifully into this theme, playing an epic sumer wants – more informed choices. Yes, we doand selling of goods, and telling a story about the product film about the ‘cold, mineral rich waters of the raging want to preserve the environment, we do want healthyand its manufacturer. As one of the very first packaged North Atlantic’ on your smartphone or tablet. options, we may be calorie counting or allergic tobrands, Quaker’s name and symbol epitomised the mostpopular of all brand stories: trust and dependability. Nowadays we’ve become used to packaging as a so-phisticated marketing tool, using the subtle interplay of “in many fields a wealth of information is creatingform, materials, colour and design to appeal to our sense a poverty of attention, meaning that as consumersof self. Without saying a word packaging speaks to us, we make a lot of short-cuts (technically knownearning it the reputation of ‘The Silent Salesman’. as choice heuristics) in arriving at our decisions.” But now digital technology is changing the gameagain – souping-up our view of the real world with an Now if the real bottle could suddenly trigger this nuts and we are interested in provenance; but no, weoverlay of virtual information, which brands are moving story again from the shelf as I walk past, we might just haven’t got all day. Research by experts in business,to exploit. Far from being the silent salesman, packag- be in business, and of course this kind of interactivity psychology and neuroscience has shown that in manying can now broadcast its own advertising, show you is surely where we’re heading. fields a wealth of information is creating a poverty ofa 3D version of its contents in action, or take you to a Google glasses, currently in test phase, promise to attention, meaning that as consumers we make a lotmicrosite or app, all with the swipe of a smartphone. superimpose informational or experiential graphics on of short-cuts (technically known as choice heuristics) Brancott Estate, for example, now features a QR top of real world objects, triggered not through codes in arriving at our decisions.code on its back label that opens the digital door to 14 but more advanced object recognition technology. Typically we will ignore most of the available informa-different brand experiences, prompting its marketing Nutrition and price information could appear mid- tion and rely on a few important cues, like good old-people to dub it ‘the world’s most curious bottle’. aisle, a nod of the head present us with recipe ideas, fashioned pre-digital packaging design. It’s innovative, but trying it at a dinner party I was in and a satnav function would avoid us having to ask Technology-enhanced ‘experiential’ packagingdanger of becoming the world’s least interesting guest, where to find the cupcakes. design will no doubt flourish in the coming years, butas I downloaded the app and presented my phone to the It might be a while before we have access to the kind it must go beyond the level of a short term technologycode repeatedly so I could tell my friends about the New of infographics Tony Stark (aka Iron Man) enjoys, but the ‘hit’ if it is to achieve true brand engagement.Zealand climate, or what we should have been eating likes of Google, Layar and Aurasma are clearly working to One thing is for sure: brands and their agencies arewith this wine. By that time they were on the dessert. provide new interactive experiences and transactions. all going to face plenty of challenges, but also have a Much as I applaud this exploration of ways to en- But back in the present day, digital applications lot of fun, as we explore this brave new world.
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com packaging23 01! 02 03 01 Suremen’s interactive packaging turns deodorant cans into game controllers 02 Google glasses could herald the dawn of interactive transactions 03 Taggie, the app from Niels van Hoof, helps inform children of the origin, cultivation, variety and nutritional values of fruit and veg
    • Want to be aninfluencer online?Become asocialeader withsocial media yWhether you’re new to social mediaor racing to keep up with every newplatform, you can master the art ofsocial media storytelling:• Cut through the noise and attract larger, more important iy communities• Build relationships that will accelerate your growth and magnify your influence• Create narratives that will last and a reputation your rivals will envy e• Track your social capital so you can improve it and become a serious online influencer Buy your copy today from Available in print and e-book format
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com book preview25 In the first of a series of new book reviews and previews, The Drum brings you an extract from Jay Oatway’s new title Mastering Story, Community and Influence, in which the author explains how to use social media to become a socialeader.ALL ABOARDTHE SOCIAL TRAINB egin with the end in mind. A massive organi- out for those around you. Build a reputation as someone and where you want to be in just a few years. You are zational shift is coming – to the way we work who takes care of his or her community. It’s how you help not going to get there solely offline, at least not for much and the way we live. It’s everywhere. There is others that is going to make the real distinction in your longer. no escaping it. Everyone is a media company reputation. Don’t leave your future to chance. Don’t be the boatnow. And, as the effects of online influence remap the Be accountable to your audiences, for it is they who without the rudder. Be proactive in building your influ-world, you will want to ensure a seat at the table for your- give you your authority. They are the ones who will back ence: manage your Dunbar Portfolio; connect to the rightself and for your family. Your best chance is to become a you in a fight. Don’t just ‘build’ community, become a part people, not the most people; claim a larger mind share ofSocialeader and rise with the tide. of one. Be bold and take a leadership role if you can. the master narrative. Be confident in yourself – you can The divide between the social ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’ Get involved with the work of other people; let that com- be a significant online player. This isn’t the mass mediawill be very real. Those who fail to chase this opportu- munity participate in your work. This is the beginning of era where the limelight was reserved for the anointednity today are placing their future in jeopardy. We have an era of collaboration, and those of us who have come few. Today, all the online influence you want is there forseen the beginnings of a reputation economy take hold, from a previous era need to make a conscious decision the taking. Go get it.with velvet ropes going up around goods and services to open up in a way that is much more natural to the Online influence, once you’ve had a taste of it, will bereserved for only those with enough online influence. digital natives. hard to let go of. But don’t let it change you. Keep it real. That online influence doesn’t just happen. It can’t truly But the digital natives also need role models. We need Sure, go ahead and enjoy some of the spoils of online in-be bought – no matter how many digital agencies say to set the example for the professional way to conduct fluence, but remember that any social credit you acceptthey can sell it to you. Socialeaders must find their own ourselves through social media – it’s no different from the will force you to find a way to balance the social capital.stories. You must be clear in your heart what you stand phone, which can also be misused at work or used to Don’t let your reputation be tarnished by the acts offor. And you must step confidently onto the public stage close a big deal. At the time of writing this book, only 19 others. Guard it jealously, for it is your future – and every-and start meeting people. per cent of Fortune 100 CEOs were on Facebook and thing that happens online stays online. Search engines To be a social ‘have’, seek out the connections you only 13 were on LinkedIn. Today’s leaders must do more don’t forget. Begin today with that in mind.need to get to where you want to go. Foster those con- to demonstrate to the next generation of leaders how it The Socialeader train is now leav-nections through the exchange of social currency, letting is done. ing the station. If you run, you can stillyour curation tell your story, rather than coming on too You need to look to building and leveraging long-term catch it.strong with a sales pitch. People want to be wooed. But partnerships, instead of burning bridges with spammyremember, loyalty can’t be bought. It is earned through promotions. We are at the beginnings of cultivating an Taken from Mastering Story,actions. online army that will be with us for the rest of our lives. Community and Influence by Jay Actions speak louder than words, which means that The rest of our lives. Say that out loud and let it sink in. Oatway (Wiley, £16.99). Out nowwe need to put others before ourselves. Don’t let your We have decades of social media to come in our lives. in print and ebook format, fromquest for influence become an ego project. Instead, look Start connecting the dots between where you are today all good bookshops.
    • 26dead brands www.thedrum.com JUL.20.12 THE DRUMFAILURE TO For every new product on our supermarket shelves there areLAUNCH 10 consigned to the reject bin. But where do brands go to die? The Drum finds out...A s any rocketeer will tell you, a successful As the industry’s own benchmark failure rate of 90 per backers were convinced they would be a success. Un- launch is critical to success, but nowhere cent attests, this is literally a collection of rubbish, but derstanding the wayward processes and flawed think- is that truism more appropriate than in McMath wasn’t off his shopping trolley. So expansive is ing that gave birth to caffeinated beer means you’re the cut-throat world of marketing. Whilst his collection that the stock has since achieved a lustre best placed to avoid a similar pitfall – if we never learn it may not be rocket science, the division brought by rarity it could never achieve in ubiquity. from our mistakes, we are destined to repeat them.between success and failure here is equally as stark. The resulting graveyard of entombed plastic, card- Accentuating the positive qualities of his charge, Step forward the Museum of Failed Products, an board and paper still wears the jaunty optimism of ex- the museum’s current custodian David Stanton, VPanti-supermarket which occupies a niche spot at odds pected success on its sleeves. From the confident pri- of marketing communications at GfK, told The Drum:with the piped music, yellow lit, temples to consumer- mary colours of Kick, the caffeinated beer, to the smiling “Our collection is not of ‘failed products’, but ratherism we’re all familiar with. ‘Incre-Edibles’ family slurping microwaveable scram- of innovations in packaging and marketing; we use it Contrary to appearances, our supermarkets are bled eggs for perpetuity, these embalmed figures have with clients for ideation and inspiration, and it includesawash with success; their shelves lined with products achieved defacto immortality for their troubles, their plas- many items that have been successful.” Half a centurywhich have demonstrated their appeal to the masses tic gravestones likely to outlast all but the hardiest non- of acquisitions later and McMath’s magpie-like ten-and proven their ability to convince shoppers to part biodegradable detritus for the next thousand years. dencies have paid off handsomely, it seems.with their cash. But big brands, once ensconced, are Where the storehouse succeeds is in finally making It is clear, though, that for all the lessons learned, fail-difficult to dislodge, and paint a very incomplete pic- a success of these assorted failures by capturing ure is still an option and if the museum is to avoid theture of the product ecosystem, which is where the the full diversity of the weird and wonderful creations fate which befell its contents over the next 50 years, itMuseum comes in. dreamed up by product design businesses. It proves will need to diversify. In marketing, as in nature, not ev- Creation of Robert McMath, a former marketing man that the retail sphere is just as  brutal as the natural eryone can be successful, but at least with the resourceintent on creating a reference library of when consumer world with the death, blood and decay evident in the we can at least lower the odds of repeating mistakes.goods go bad, the storehouse in Ann Arbor, Michigan natural world reflected in the cancellation, losses and By eschewing grand works of art for the humdrumhas been on the go since the 1960s when McMath pulping of the many abortive launch attempts. detritus which litters our everyday lives, the museum(since followed by his successors at GfK Custom Re- Like present day anthropologists, modern market- in many ways speaks more tellingly about us as a so-search) started buying samples of every new product to ers are flocking to this grisly scene in a bid to avoid ciety than the greatest works of a niche creative classcome to market. As a sort of latter day Noah, McMath similar fate, spurred by the realisation that in order to ever could. Perhaps we would all benefit from a tourbought one of every single new product he could lay his be successful, you can’t just study success. But it isn’t of these aisles of failure; we might just feel a bit morehands on for the ultimate time capsule. simply because these items failed, it’s because their optimistic as a result. 02 03
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com dead brands2701
    • THE DRUM DIRECTORY thedrum.com/directoryHere you will find a selection of our online directory advertisers.To view their company profile, work and case studies go to www.thedrum.com/directoryTo find out more contact Victoria Swan on 0141 559 6070 or victoria.swan@thedrum.comAGENCY MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE AGENCY MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE DESIGN AND BRANDING AND Ryster COMMUNICATION Tel: 07746 092214 Contact: Ryan Falconer Happy giraffe ryan@ryster.co.uk Tel: 01562 886 752 www.ryster.co.uk Contact: Kerry Baynon pearce kerry@happy-giraffe.com WashSynergist Regain control and visibility Sohnar Ltd Traffic LIVE is designed www.happy-giraffe.com Tel: 01772 880 000 with the complete agency to make complex studio Contact: Andy WalmsleyTel: 0870 444 9656 Tel: 0800 880 3008 system. Quick scheduling and scheduling easy. It helps DESIGN AND DIGITAL andy@wash-design.co.ukContact: Nick Lane Contact: Callum Broderick easy client portal. 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    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com dead brands2904 0506 0807 01 & 02 Whole aisles devoted to failed pizza brands, including Pizza Stuffers – pastry cases filled with toppings 03 Caffeinated beer brand Molson Kick failed to engage either beer drinkers or energy seekers 04 Surprisingly enough, microwavable pre-scrambled eggs, sold in a cardboard tube, just didn’t take off 05 These self-heating soup cans had an unfortunate tendency to explode in people’s faces 06 & 07 Perhaps consumers didn’t like to be reminded of their oily hair, or maybe they just didn’t fancy smearing yoghurt on it 08 Pepsi AM contained more caffeine than average Pepsi but that didn’t encourage people to wash down their breakfast cereal with it
    • THE DRUM JUL.20.12 www.thedrum.com LAST WORD30Last WordTim Downs of Aberfield Communications has the last word this issue, taking umbrage at the same sillyPR stunts being recycled every summer. Now, he says, it’s time to banish these unoriginal ideas intoRoom 101. For the chance to see your opinions in print send comment pieces to opinion@thedrum.com. PR SILLY SEASON STUNTS WE SHOULD BANISH TO ROOM 101 Tim DownsWe’re about to enter a delightful time Heart emblazoned with the words ‘fineof year where journos switch off and filly’, a fried breakfast and a giant Olym-some PRs attempt to flog any old guff pic Torch. Oh come on!to their clients, safe in the knowledge Why? Because it got coverage in thethat the sun is shining and they’ll Baltimore Sun?pretty much buy anything. I have to hold my hands up and admit It’s where hard news goes out of the that I did this for a client in 2002 andwindow and PRs take a trip to the cre- it wasn’t new then. Ten years later, isative attic, throw the dust sheets off a this really a defendable use of a client’sfew creaky old ideas and drag them budget? Does it drive sales, increaseblinking into the media spotlight. brand engagement, influence consum- Some give them a new lick of paint and ers in any way at all? No.parade them as the latest thinking. Others So this brings me on to some exam-can’t even be bothered to do that. ples that I and a number of my industry Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to colleagues have already had the misfor-silly season. tune to see or expect to see over the You’ll recognise these ideas because, next eight weeks.well, you’ve seen them a million timesbefore and probably pitched or bought 1. Making a dress out of stuff other than “WE CAN’T QUESTION WHY ADVERTISINGthem yourself – 10 years ago. Hopefully normal material – generally includes AGENCIES KEEP WINNING THE BIG PRyou’re a little older and wiser now. vegetables, sweets, chocolate or even AWARDS AT CANNES LIONS WHEN THIS If you’re unsure of the ideas I mean, human hair (gag!). IS WHAT WE PRODUCE.”start to get nervous because there’s a 2. Same as above, but replace a dresschance that you’re still pitching them. with a piece of ‘art’. Haribo, you can I’ll be giving a few top examples later do better than a portrait of the Queen I’m stopping there but I know that will it achieve. We can’t question why(I hesitate to say a ‘top 10’ as these made out of Starmix. Do you really need you can think of a tonne more of advertising agencies keep winning themight also make the list) but, before I to raise brand awareness this way? your personal pet hates so feel free big PR awards at Cannes Lions whendo, I want to identify when silly season 3. Look-a-likes. I don’t think I need to to share; be it dream jobs, that shot this is what we produce.starts. What heralds the arrival of this say anymore, Poundland. from American Beauty with the rose These can still be useful when ap-creative abyss? 4. Flash mobs. Can we just let the good petals substituted for the ingredients proached with ambition, scale and a Well, after the significant and robust people of London get to work without of a limp salad, or the ubiquitous silly clear sense of purpose. But if you’reresearch of my navel, I can pinpoint that having to negotiate a co-ordinated dance season surveys. simply copying what went before be-Royal Ascot and the mind-numbingly routine, snog or talk like a pirate-a-thon? You may think that I’m saying you cause it got good coverage, then givedated brand hat opens the official flood- 5. Reverse graffiti or chalk drawings on should never use these tactics again the rest of us a break. This summer isgates of this particular PR Room101. pavements or some other such pave- and actually I’m not (apart from the already wet enough without more damp Yes, this dead horse is still being ment art. Yes, they are impressive but Ascot hat). squibs adding to the misery.flogged (pardon the pun). It’s 2012 and another hilarious picture of someone What I’m saying is, before you thinkthere was someone with a Subbuteo pretending to fall off nothing does not about pitching or buying an idea like Share your PR pet hates on the origi-football pitch on their head, a Love make a successful PR campaign. this, please ask yourself why and what nal piece at thedrum.com/opinion FOR MORE BLOGS GO TO THEDRUM.COM/OPINION
    • NEW JOBS UPLOADED DAILY @ WWW.THEDRUM.COM/JOBS RECRUITMENT31 ARTWORKER SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER England - North West | £18k East Central | £26,594 to £31,170 pa We are looking for a talented creative with strong typographical skills, This is an excellent opportunity for a self-motivated graphic designer to full training and a Graphics qualification, plus a real flair for translating develop and deliver materials that make an impact in securing a brighter ideas into visual communications that work. future for Scotland’s vulnerable children and young people. http://bit.ly/Q1zyUy http://bit.ly/Mrpgrt SENIOR CREATIVE DIGITAL ACCOUNT DIRECTOR Yorkshire & The Humber | £30-35k North West | £40-£45k Successful TTL agency looking for a creative who will lead the agency on the Digital account director urgently required to work for a rapidly creative front, creating fresh, effective and award worthy solutions. expanding RAR recommended digital agency with an exciting portfolio of house hold brands. http://bit.ly/Q1zGDu http://bit.ly/Q1zO5O MIDDLEWEIGHT COPYWRITER GRAPHIC DESIGNER South West | £24-£34k North West | £25k Charity specialist agency in Cheltenham seeks a middleweight writer. Do you have strong experience in an agency studio working on retail or Do you have the words and ideas to produce creative for some of the fmcg accounts? You must be able to provide a short pdf of your work UK’s biggest charities? along with your CV. http://bit.ly/Mrphfc http://bit.ly/OIK8t6 E-MARKETING EXECUTIVE DESIGN DIRECTOR North West | £18-£23k London | £Excellent My client is looking for an assistant marketing member of the Global brand creation and engagement agency require an enthusiastic team that will support the marketing manager with a series of and strategic design director who can produce big ideas and forge projects and strategies. lasting relationships with clients. http://bit.ly/Q1AmbO http://bit.ly/Nc9VyC DIGITAL PROJECT MANAGER JUNIOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE North West | £Up to £30k London | Up to £21k Opportunity to work closely with the managing director, ecommerce Strategic digital marketing agency require a junior business development team and web design directors and lead a team of designers and executive (BDE) to join their fast paced international loyalty marketing programmers. arm of the business. http://bit.ly/Mc7NFd http://bit.ly/Q1As3r Over 650 live jobs on The Drum, visit: www.thedrum.com/jobs To find out more call Tehmeena on 0141 559 6064
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