CFC Day 19

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Lesson Guide of Day 19 for the Construction Foundation Course

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CFC Day 19

  1. 1. LEARN – DAY 19 Construction Foundation Course
  2. 2. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) Content for the day • Hour 1: Communications in construction • Hour 2: Construction math • Hour 3: Safety/PPE • Hour 4: Safety/PPE
  3. 3. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) Materials for the day - 1 • Memo chart paper - Purpose of your memo: 1. To state that your pay check was 2.5 hours short 2. To compliment a worker in the hardware store for his excellent service and attention to detail 3. To recommend a certain brand of circular saw to an acquaintance • Memo/email format • Sample persuasive memo • Sample email • Persuasive memo rubric (continued on next slide)
  4. 4. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) Materials for the day - 2 (continued from previous slide) • Email rubric • Resource 5.26 - Name That PPT • Hard hat for each student • Safety glasses for each student • 5 half mask respirators • Resource 4.14 - Steps in Adding, Converting, and Simplifying Fractions • Resource 4.15 – Personal Protective Equipment • Resource 4.19 - Fraction Circles
  5. 5. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 1 • Check-in: Shake hands. Remind students: binders, seating. Start class. • Review the day: Review the day’s activities from the list on the board or chart paper. • Binder check: This can be done at any time during the day.
  6. 6. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 2 Explain that, over the next several days, students will be learning about professional communications—writing, speaking, and listening. Today, the focus is on persuasive memos. 10 min. Introduction to memos: Explain that students will periodically write memos in their construction careers; these memos might explain a misunderstanding about a time card, provide step-by-step directions, or analyze why something went wrong. It’s essential that these communications be very clear. Explain that you’ll first look at memo format. Pass out hard copy of the memo and email format and sample memo. Cover each part of the memo template (not the email) by explaining what it does and then finding it on the sample. Have students make out the vocabulary card for ―memo format.‖ Construction Communications: Written
  7. 7. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 3 20 min. Continue the discussion. Explain that there are many different types of memos. The format for all is the same, but the organization of the content will differ significantly. The format for the sample is persuasive. For persuasive, we establish exactly our position (the purpose) and then persuade the reader to agree with us by citing valid reasons, facts, expert opinions, or other data. Have students make out the vocabulary card for ―persuasive memo.‖ Tell students that, in the sample, the purpose is very clear. Have them look through the sample memo and find it. Wait Time. Call on a student. Answer: ―To request a 10-day vacation in the first two weeks of June.‖
  8. 8. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 4 Ask, ―What are the 2 logical reasons Keith uses to persuade his boss to grant his request?‖ Wait Time. Call on a student. Answer: (1) his cousin’s graduation, and (2) his father’s 50th birthday. Are these primarily rational or emotional reasons? Wait Time. Call on a student. Emotional. Explain that the logic you use to prove your point can be rational, that is, fact- based or it can be emotional, as Keith’s argument is by appealing to our sense of family. Tell students they’re going to work on their logic—rational and emotional—to support their purpose. So here’s one purpose for a memo: to complain about a battery- operated drill that you bought two weeks ago. In your Work Teams, take 30 seconds to come up with 2 reasons why you are unhappy with the drill.
  9. 9. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 5 After 30 seconds, call on a Team and write their responses on the board. Ask if any other Team had something different. Keep asking until you have all the different responses Teams came up with. Then go through the list to cross out any that are not logical reasons why someone might be complaining about a drill. For example, if your list includes the following: • The batteries take a full day to charge. • The chuck won’t take two of the drills. • This is not the best brand. • The reverse switch doesn’t work. You would cross out the 3rd item as illogical. You got the brand you ordered; it doesn’t matter if it wasn’t the best brand.
  10. 10. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 6 Do a few more examples. Put up the memo chart paper: Purpose of your memo: 1. To complain about the poor service you received in the hardware store 2. To compliment a worker in the hardware store for his excellent service and attention to detail 3. To recommend a certain brand of circular saw to an acquaintance Tell the students, ―Here are purposes for 3 different memos. Your Work Team has 30 seconds to come up with 3 reasons for #1. Go.‖ After 30 seconds, call on one Team. Check responses from others for logic like you did before. Ask which reasons are rational and which, if any, are emotional. Repeat for purposes 2 and 3. .
  11. 11. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 7 20 min. Now let’s say that we want to write this memo as an email. Here the format is a little different. Have students refer to memo/email format page while you pass out the sample email and email rubric. Have make out a vocabulary card for ―email format‖ while you explain each part using the sample email. Have students choose one of the three memos to write as an email in pair-share partnerships. 10 min. Have partnerships trade emails and rate according to the rubric. Ask 2 partnerships with highly rated emails to read theirs aloud while the class informally rates them to find areas that could be improved. Stretch Break
  12. 12. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 8 60 min. Fractions. Let students know that both the academic and technical skills taught in Construction Trades are primarily about learning and following the steps in a process. The process can be a mathematical procedure like using the information that we gather from our measurements to design a wall; or following steps to actually frame a wall. Success in the trade is tied to our ability to ask questions when we do not understand any step in a process and to adjust what we’re doing based on the answer. We call this ―asking for clarification ― which means using clear questions to ask a knowledgeable person to explain what we do not understand. Today we’re going to use adding, converting and simplifying fractions to practice following steps in a process. Construction Math
  13. 13. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 9 Hand out Resource 4.14 - Steps in Adding, Converting, and Simplifying Fractions. Have students read the steps in adding, converting and simplifying fractions. Tell students that you want them follow along as you model these steps throughout today’s lesson. While students are reading write the following vocabulary terms and definitions on a flip chart or the white board and have students prepare vocabulary cards for: • Data: Numerical information used in a calculation • Perimeter: The distance around a two dimension shape like the outside dimensions of a floor. • Proper Fraction: A fraction where the numerator (top number) is less than the denominator (bottom number). (Continued on next slide)
  14. 14. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 10 • Mixed Number: A whole number and a proper fraction or decimal combined. • Denominator: The expression written below the line in a common fraction that indicates the number of parts into which one whole is divided. • Numerator: The expression written above the line in a common fraction to indicate the number of parts of the whole. • Improper Fraction: A fraction that has a top number larger than (or equal to) the bottom number Remind students that being able to read the tape measure accurately is not enough. They also need to know what to do with the data, such as they may need to add up the measures of the walls of a room in order to find its perimeter? Using measurement data almost always means dealing with whole numbers like 2, proper fractions like 3/5, and mixed numbers like 2-3/5. (continued from previous slide)
  15. 15. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 11 Adding fractions with the same denominators. Pass out Resource 4.19 - Fraction Circles. Write the following equations on the board ¼ + ¾ = _____ 1/3 + 1/3 = 2/5 + 3/5 = 1/6 + 1/6 = 3/7 + 3/7 = 5/8 + 2/8 = 2/9 + 5/9 = 3/10 + 4/10 = 5/11 + 4/11 = 9/12 + 2/12 =
  16. 16. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 12 Use Resource 4.19 - Fraction Circles handout to show students how to add the first problem by first looking at the circle with the number given in the denominator of the equation and then counting the total of the numbers given in the numerator. Have students work independently to solve the remaining problems. Call on individuals for answers and to confirm correctness. Ask students how to use the following equation that you write on the white board: ¾ + ¾ = ______ Call on a student for the answer and explain that this is an improper fraction. Students will need to change it to a mixed number to be able to use it to determine a measurement. Remind them that they can divide the denominator into the numerator, which gives them 1 2/4. That can still be reduced to 1 ½.
  17. 17. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 13 Practice and model a few more equations with common denominators. Modeling the steps listed in Resource 4.14 - Steps in Adding, Converting and Simplifying Fractions, reminding students to follow along and make notes on their Resource. Practice problems should use 2, 4, 8, and 16 in the denominator to engage students with the measurement context. Don’t go on to the next step until you feel that most students are comfortable with this concept. Next write this equation: ½ + ¾ = _______
  18. 18. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 14 Ask students how to solve this one. (Wait time.) Remind them that sometimes they need to change the form of a fraction so it can be added, and that’s another reason why knowing what the ―other‖ names of the lines on a tape measure is important. ½ is also 2/4, 4/8, and 8/16 – by knowing that, they can easily add it to any other number on the tape measure. Use Resource 4.14 - Steps in Adding, Converting and Simplifying Fractions to ―think aloud‖ as you model each step in adding fractions with different denominators.
  19. 19. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 15 Return to your example of the importance of knowing the ―other‖ names of lines on a tape measure and convert ½ to 2/4 on the board and write the answer (5/4, or 1 ¼). This step in the activity also needs some on-the-whiteboard and at-the-seat practice. Note students who may be struggling throughout this math activity. Ask them to use Resource 4.14 to identify which step in which process requires clarification. Team students who have mastered the processes with students who require further clarification. If required, talk with the Academic instructors to request additional guidance and practice around specific steps in the process. .
  20. 20. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 16 Remind students that the basic building block of math is addition, and that subtraction is the opposite of addition. With that in mind, write these equations on the board: ¾ - ¼ = ______ ½ - ¼ = _______ Do these one at a time, returning back to the principles they just reviewed about adding fractions with common and different denominators. If the same rules for addition apply, students know that in the first equation the denominators are the same and so 3 – 1 = 2, 2/4 can be reduced and the answer is ½. In the second example, they will need to change ½ to 2/4 so denominators are the same, 2 – 1 = 1 and the answer is ¼. To reduce a fraction to its lowest terms, that is simplify a fraction the numerator and the denominator must be divided by the same nonzero whole number.
  21. 21. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 17 Practice and Application. Using the whiteboard or a flipchart, write up four sections of 5 problems each for students to practice on – addition and subtraction with common denominators, and addition and subtraction with different denominators (Generate your own and, once again, try to use 2, 4, 8, and 16 in the denominator to engage students with the measurement context.). Label the lists A, B, C, and D. Divide students into work teams of 4-5 and assign one work team to each list. Their tasks are to copy the problems from the list down in their notebooks, work together to solve them and check them, and then circle or note any parts that they still have questions about or do not understand. Ask them to use Resource 4.14 to identify which step in which process requires clarification
  22. 22. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 18 Give students about 8 minutes with the first list, then move them all on to the next list for 8 minutes and so on. Tell students that you recognize that they might not finish all the problems, but they need to be sure to copy all the problems down. They can finish them for homework. At the end of the four rotations, solicit questions from students. If questions relate to specific steps in the process of adding, converting or simplifying fractions, encourage students to use Resource 4.14 - Steps in Adding, Converting, and Simplifying Fractions to frame the question. Remind students that like all things, math skills come through practice. Snack Break (9:30-9:40)
  23. 23. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 – 11:30) - 1 10 min. Assign each group the responsibility for teaching the whole class one of the following items, including vocabulary terms, on pp. 204-209. Each group will have 3 minutes for their teaching time. 1. Scaffolds and dismantling scaffolds • Scaffold • Scaffold planks • Pipe scaffolding 2. Scaffold stability and scaffold safety • Scaffold stability ratio (Continued on next slide) Safety/PPE
  24. 24. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 – 11:30) - 2 3. Brackets and Trestles • Brackets • Trestle 4. Pump jacks and Lifelines • Pump jack • Lifeline 15 min. Presentations by each group. Students take notes and fill out vocabulary cards (continued from previous slide)
  25. 25. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 – 11:30) - 3 5 min. Explain the game, ―Name That…‖ (See Appendix A and Resource 5.26). Teams line up facing you and the screen, so you have 5 lines like you did in First Down. You put up the slide and say one of the following commands: • Name • Care • Use The person who answers correctly first gets the point for their Team. Ties get fractional points (another math opportunity!) The person who answers correctly first gets the point for their Team. Ties get fractional points (another math opportunity!) Have pair-share partnerships practice vocabulary cards from today. 20 min. Have Teams practice vocabulary cards for entire week so far. 15 min. Play ―Name That…‖ Use Resource 5.26 - Name That…‖ PPT. (Doubles as stretch break)
  26. 26. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 – 11:30) - 4 5 min. Read Personal Protective Equipment on p. 94. Have students make a vocabulary card for • ANSI 10 min. Have Teams read Hearing Protection, p. 94 and take notes. Provide a mini-lecture on earplugs and maximum noise levels; see Resource 4.15 – Personal Protective Equipment. Use the table to impress on students how quickly hearing can be damaged by exposure to construction site sounds. Have students make vocabulary cards for • Ear protectors/earmuffs • Earplugs
  27. 27. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 – 11:30) - 5 10 min. Have Teams read the section on Head Protection and Eye Protection. Provide additional information from Instructor Resource D. Check student notes for the following: when is eye protection required, what are the special requirements for welders, what are the general precautions for eye care. Have students make vocabulary cards for • Hard hat • Safety glasses • Safety goggles • Face shield Have pair-share partners put on hard hats and safety glasses and goggles while checking for correct placement.
  28. 28. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 – 11:30) - 6 10 min. Give a mini-lecture from the information in Resource 4.15 on Respiratory Protection while students take notes. Check notes for 4 kinds of respirators, employer requirements, employee requirements, seal check for full facepiece, inspecting respirators, maintaining respirators. Have teams make vocabulary cards for • Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) • Full facepiece mask • Half mask Give Teams each a half-mask respirator; have each person try on the respirator, making sure there is a good seal.
  29. 29. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 – 11:30) - 7 10 min. Give a mini-lecture from the information in Resource 4.15 on hand, leg, foot, and skin protection. Check notes for use of gloves, guidelines for leg protection, ANSI-approved shoes (steel sole, safety toe, heavy leather), and 2 skin problems. Have students make vocabulary cards for • Work gloves • Safety shoes Add the following vocabulary cards, noting that the last two are not technically PPE but are personal equipment items that allow construction workers to maximize efficiency: • Back support belt • Knee pads • Tool pouch/belt • Carpenter’s pencil Reflection. Out the door:Model Notes,Reflection, binders on the shelf, shake hands.
  30. 30. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) AFTER HOURS - 1 Homework: Give each Work Team the following assignmen Mr. Bueno really appreciated the stories you provided. His 7th graders have been much more attentive to safety issues since they read your work. He has now requested that you make a short presentation to his classes. He would like there to be two parts to the 4 minute presentation: 1. A PPT of 7 slides on OSHA. The first would be an introduction and the last a summary. The 5 slides in the middle would feature the 3 main things employers must do and the 2 main things employees must do under OSHA. 2. A skit featuring an OSHA inspection where there are 2 employees involved, one of whom is clearly in violation of occupational safety standards in his PPE use, his clothes, and his actions and the other of whom is a model of occupational safety standards. The skit should have an appropriate ending.
  31. 31. Week Four: Day 19 (Thursday) AFTER HOURS - 2 The presentation will be assessed by the rubric below. Element Great job Adequate Below standard Appeal to target audience 7th graders will love this, and it will make them understand the importance of OSHA and safety Has appeal for 7th graders but won’t necessarily make them more knowledgeable about OSHA or safety Has little appeal for 7th graders; very little chance that it will make them any more knowledgeable Accuracy of information about OSHA Accuracy of information about OSHA Information used is mostly accurate, with 1 or 2 exceptions Information used is mostly accurate, but there are more than 2 major errors Accuracy of information about safety measure(s) Information used in the skit is totally Information used is mostly accurate, with 1 or 2 exceptions Information used is mostly accurate, but there are more than 2 major errors Compliance with assignment PPT is 7 slides, 5 focusing on employer and employee obligations; skit provides good/bad models and logical conclusion; presentation is within 30 seconds of 4 min PPT is 7 slides, 5 focusing on employer and employee obligations; skit provides good/bad models and logical conclusion; presentation is within 1 minute of 4 min PPT is incorrect OR skit is incorrect OR total length is more than 1 minute off of 4 minutes • Open Computer Lab
  32. 32. END If you continue to click forward, you will see links to presentations of similar content available through slideshare.com Content prepared for the National Office of Job Corps through Contract No. DOLJ111A21695 Job Corps Professional Development Support - KUCRL

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