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Lesson Guide of Day 22 for the Construction Foundation Course

Lesson Guide of Day 22 for the Construction Foundation Course

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CFC Day 22 CFC Day 22 Presentation Transcript

  • LEARN – DAY 22 Construction Foundation Course
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Content for the day • Hour 1: Construction Math • Hour 2: Blueprints • Hour 3: Materials Handling • Hour 4: Materials Handling
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Materials for the day • Wooden standard ruler, one per student. • Calculators, one per student • Wooden flat scale (1/4 and 1/8) architect’s ruler (1 per student) • A magnetic dartboard (e.g., Amazon.com, $12.00) • Resource 5.9 - How to Read an Architect’s Scale • Resource 5.9A - Architect’s Scale Wall Chart Triangular architect’s ruler (1 to show) • Resource 5.10 - Calculating Square Footage Practice Sheet • Resource 5.11 - Calculating Square Footage Floor Plan Sketch
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Materials for the day (cont.) • Resource 5.12 – Calculating Square Footage Instructor Answer Sheet • Resource 5.13 – Student Worksheet – Cylindrical Volume Problems • Resource 5.14 – Instructor Resource – Cylindrical Volume Problems • Resource 5.15 – Basics of Material Handling • Resource 5.16 - The Standards System Student Copy and Resource • Resource 5.17 - Meters, Liters, and Grams Student Copy Blue, yellow, and green plastic strips • Orange, red, and brown plastic strips • Homework: Math and Measurement Raps
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 1 5 min. Tell students that they are developing math skills necessary to complete their training and to perform well on the job. Remind them that over the past five days construction math has focused on basic math operations and measurement. The next units will focus on important construction math skills like using ratio and proportion and we’ll continue to work with lines, shapes and angles. Remind students to take notes and use blank vocabulary cards to define terms as you use them. Explain that today we’ll continue to calculate square footage. Ask students to recall the definition of square footage [a measurement of area, and area is the measurement of any two-dimensional space contained within a set of lines]. Call on a student for the formula for calculating the square footage of a square of a rectangle [A=l x w]. Construction Math
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 2 Have students work in pair-shares to calculate problems in Resource 5.10 - Calculating Square Footage Practice Sheet. Call on pair-shares for answers. Solutions: #1: wall = 516 ft2; opening = 12 ft2 #2: wall = 532 ft2; opening = 21 ft2 #3: wall = 600 ft2; opening = 35 ft #4: wall = 630 ft2; openings = 27 ft2 Share answers as a group. While students are performing the calculations, hand out wooden standard rulers and calculators. Call on a student for the answers to the Practice Sheet. Confirm correctness with a second student.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 3 10 min. Remind students that a square foot doesn't necessarily have to be shaped like a square or a rectangle. The dance floor above could be shaped like a triangle and cover the same amount of area. If you were asked to determine the area of a triangle the formula would be different, but the concept is the same. Ask students to use their rulers to draw a triangle on a ½ size sheet of scratch paper. The base or bottom of the triangle is 4”and the height is 3”. Draw a 5” line segment to connect the two legs to form the third and longest line of the triangle. Ask if anyone can tell you what type of triangle you have formed. [right triangle] Tell students to create a vocabulary card for right triangle. A right triangle has one 900 angle.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 4 Stretch Break. Have students stand and form a 900 angle with their arms. Wait until all students have formed the angle with their arms. With arms still extended, ask if anyone can tell you the name of the longest line in a right triangle. [Hypotenuse] Ask students to repeat the word two or three times and then show them a memory device for the term. With your arms extended to form a 900 angle wave the hand that is extended upward several times while saying “Hi, Hi, hypotenuse.” As you say “hypotenuse,” lower the hand extended upward to form the hypotenuse and touch the hand extended outward. Ask students to repeat the words and gesture several times.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 5 When students are seated have them return to their drawing of a right triangle. Ask them to imagine and then draw what would happen if a duplicate copy of their drawn triangle was rotated so that the two hypotenuses aligned perfectly. What shape would be formed? [rectangle] Ask students what they think the formula would be to find the area of a right triangle and write the formula on the white board [Area of a triangle = ½ (Base x Height)or A=½bh] noting the change in terms from length to base and width to height. Ask students to create a vocabulary card with Area of a Triangle on the front and the formula on the back of the card. Have students calculate the area of the 3”x4”x5” triangle that they drew. [6”] Call on a student for the answer. Use wait time and call on a second student to confirm the answer.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 6 5 min. So what if that dance floor isn’t shaped as a rectangle or a right triangle but is, in fact a circle? If you were asked to determine the area of a circle the formula would be different, but the concept is the same. Draw a circle on the white board with a dot in the center of the circle. Ask students to create a vocabulary card for the term radius. As you draw a line from the dot to the inside edge of the circle, use and define the term radius. Remind students that the radius is half of the diameter.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 7 Write the formula A = πr2 on the white board. Ask students to create a second vocabulary card with Area of a Circle on the front and the formula on the back. Note that π (pi) is a special number whose value is the ratio of any circle's circumference to its diameter. Explain that we find the area of a circle by multiplying 3.l4 (the value of π) times the radius squared. Ask students to determine the value of the radius squared if the radius of circle on the board is 5 inches. [25 sq. in.] Multiply 3.14 x 25 sq. in. = 78.5 sq. in.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 8 5 min. Have students work in pair-shares to determine the area for circles with the following radii: 4 ft.; 6 in.; 3 ft. While students are performing calculations, hand out Resource 5.11 - Calculating Square Footage Floor Plan Sketch. Call on pair-shares
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 9 5 min. Have students work in pair-shares to determine the area for circles with the following radii: 4 ft.; 6 in.; 3 ft. While students are performing calculations, hand out Resource 5.11 - Calculating Square Footage Floor Plan Sketch. Call on pair-shares for answers. Use wait-time and confirm correct answer with other pair shares.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 10 25 min. Have pair-shares calculate the square footage of each room in the sketch of a floor plan and the total square footage of all rooms. Tell students to use a calculator and to round up even if the remainder is less than a half. Pair-shares who finish early should be ready to share strategies for checking their work to ensure that it is accurate. Call on pair shares for answers and examples of how they arrived at their answers. Use wait time and confirm answers with other pair shares.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 11 15 min. Remind students that Square footage is a measurement of area, and area is the measurement of any two-dimensional space contained within a set of lines. Ask what happens when you need to work in three-dimensional space, for example the length, width and depth of an object? Draw a cube on the board and wait. Explain that three-dimensional space is measured in volume. So if we need to know the volume of a board, like when we need to calculate board feet, we multiply the width of the board x the length of the board x the thickness of the board.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 12 Have students turn to p. 63 and look at Figure 2-26 to see how different shapes of wood can have the same measure in board feet. Explain that a significant amount of lumber is sold by the board foot rather than the linear foot. Have students create a vocabulary card for board foot as you define the term. The board-foot is a specialized unit of measure for the volume of lumber in the United States and Canada. It is the volume of a one-foot length of a board one foot wide and one inch thick.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 13 Draw the following illustration on the white board. The volume of one board foot is calculated as 12” x 12” x 1” = 144cubic inches (in3). To determine the number of board feet in one or more pieces of lumber use the following formula: Number of Pieces x Thickness (in.) X Width (in.) x Length (ft.) 12
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 14 10 min: Write the formula for calculating board feet on the white board and have students add it to their vocabulary card for board foot. Walk students through this practical application: You have one “2 x 4” that is 10 feet long, and you need to figure the number of board feet. You know that the formula for determining board feet is L (in feet) x W (in inches) x H (in inches) = board feet. You can’t just multiply the numbers you have as L x W x H because 2 of the measurements are in inches and 1 is in feet. That’s apples and gooseberries. So you need to convert the units of measure so they are all the same.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 15 Convert the 10’ length to inches 10’ x 12 inches/ft. = 120 inches Then calculate the cubic inches of the board by multiplying L x W x H: 120” x 4” x 2” = 960 cubic inches There are 144 cubic inches in a board foot. How do we determine the number of board feet? Wait time. Call on one; get second opinion. Divide. So…960 cubic inches divided by 144 cubic inches = 6.67 board feet.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 16 The board foot formula gives us a faster way to complete these conversions: 1 piece of wood x 2” thick x 4” wide x 10 feet long = 80/12 = 6.67 board feet Ask students to work in pair shares to solve the following problems. In his inventory, your boss has the following: - 4, 2-by-10s, each 8 ft. long - 2, 1-by-12s, each 6 ft. long - 10, 1-by-4s, each 8 ft. long How many board feet of lumber does he have? Your boss needs 100 board feet of lumber in 2-by-10s. How many 8 ft. 2-by-10s should he buy? Compare answers as a group.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 17 10 min. Explain that in construction trades we must also know how to find the volume of a cylinder. For example, many foundations require “piles” which are cylindrical tubes and of various lengths which are filled with concrete. Write the formula v = πr2h on the white board and explain that in order to calculate the volume of any cylinder the formula is π (pi) times radius squared times the height or the cylinder. An example would be a cylinder with a radius of 1’ and a height (length) of 5’. Therefore volume equals 3.14 x 1 x 1 x 5 = 15.70 cubic feet. If there are 28 piles to be poured for the foundation, 15.7 x 28 = 493.6 cubic feet. Explain that there are 27 cubic feet in 1 cubic yard. To convert cubic feet to cubic yards, we must divide 439.6 cubic feet by 27 (3 x 3 x 3) to get 18.28 cubic yards of concrete. Round up and add a waste factor to make the order.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 18 Calculating the formula would be less difficult if we were always given the radius. But that's not how pipe for example is measured. It is common to have the diameter so one must divide by 2 to get the radius. Remember, the radius is any straight line that connects a point on the circle with it's center. The radius is half of the diameter. The diameter is a line segment that connects two points on a circle through the center of the circle.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 19 Also there is an inside diameter (ID) and an outside diameter (OD) if pipe and such are used. So if you want volume of a cylindrical container it needs to be calculated using the ID for the interior space calculation not OD (otherwise you are including the volume of the pipe thickness as well as the capacity). Walk students through one of the problems in Resource 5.13 – Student Worksheet – Cylindrical Volume Problems. Have them work in pair-shares to solve the remaining three problems. Share answers as a group. Stretch Break
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 20 5 min: Do Resource 5.1 - Minute Measure PPT, slide #2, and have students trade papers, correct, and enter their data on their Personal Best chart. Ask them to use a ruler to connect the first dot from yesterday to today’s dot. The name for this type of graph is line graph; it clearly shows the direction and rate of progress. 5 min. Read the first 2 paragraphs of Understanding scale, p. 44. Go through the entire Table 2.1 translating the 1’ to 12” and asking the question, “How many 6” segments are there in 12”?” 2, so the ratio is 2:1. How many 3” segments are there in 12”?” 4, so the ratio is 4:1, Etc., gradually letting the class fill in the numbers without your help. Blueprints
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 21 25min: [The following materials will need to be prepared prior to instruction.] • Colored markers as described in the lesson that follows. Use thin plastic material like Avery polypropylene plastic dividers or Pendaflex colored folders. Measure and cut strips ½” wide and of six different lengths. The strips should begin at 0” on the architect’s scale and end on a marker line (though not necessarily a numbered marker line but not between marked lines.) Each color should be cut to the same length (e.g., 10 red strips for a class of twenty each ½” wide by 14’ on the ¼” scale). • Cut a piece of poster board approximately 6” wide by approximately 18” long. Cut it so that when one end is aligned with the 0 line of the Architect’s scale wall-graphic, the opposite end aligns with a marked line, not in between lines. This prevents the student from having to interpolate a measurement.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 22 Read the second 2 paragraphs of Understanding scale, pp. 44-45. Put up Resource 5.9A - Architect’s Scale Wall Chart Triangular architect’s ruler (1 to show). Note that it is NTS. Show students how to read the scale using Resource 5.9 - How to Read an Architect’s Scale. Give Work Teams assignments of 6 measurements to find on their architect’s scale rulers. They will draw lines of the designated length on scratch paper and label them appropriately: 1/8”: 41’, 12’, 53’ and ¼”: 15’, 27’, and 30” Have one Work Team explain their thinking and show their results. Ask for a second opinion.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) First and Second Hours (7:30 – 9:30) - 23 Use the 6” x 18” poster board to show students how to use the colored strips. Hand out the blue, yellow and green strips. Have Work Teams measure the markers on the ¼” and 1/8” scales. Have one Work Team explain their thinking and produce their outcomes. Get a second opinion. Hand out the red, orange, and brown strips. Follow the same process with pair-shares. Snack Break (9:30-9:40)
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 –11:30) - 1 5 min. Mini-lecture on the basics of materials handling. Provide the information in Resource 5.15 – Basics of Material Handling while students take notes. 15 min. Proper lifting procedures. Show the video on proper lifting procedures at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_YoOL3HipvA. Then show the preview version of a fun video that shows the 5 steps to lifting heavy loads: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MhGUkWAA9WM&feature=relmf Point out to students the heavy boxes you’ve brought in. Review the steps in lifting as you demonstrate. Stress the importance of following the steps. Not following the steps is not macho; it’s stupid. Call on a mature student to demonstrate the steps again as you narrate. Have students critically analyze his/her completion of each step. Have Teams practice having individuals lift the box. Have the student who is lifting narrate each step. Materials Handling or Manual Handling
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 –11:30) - 2 15 min. Continue the mini-lecture with the information on lowering loads from overhead and stacking boxes. Remind students to take notes. Demonstrate by putting one of the heavy boxes on the top of a classroom shelf or cabinet, removing it, and placing it on another to make a stack. Have Teams practice having individuals lift the box from overhead and stack it. Have the student who is lifting narrate each step, as before.
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 –11:30) - 3 • 10 min. Continue the mini-lecture with the information on off- set stacking for other types of materials. Have students make up vocabulary cards for the following: • Off-set lumber stacking • Off-set pipe stacking • Off-set bag stacking • Off-set brick stacking • Off-set cement block stacking • Chocking • Spotter 5 min. Continue the mini-lecture with the information about working from heights while students take notes. Stretch Break
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 –11:30) - 4 10 min. Have students study materials handling notes (as study sheets) and new vocabulary cards to mastery. 5 min. Introduce materials handling equipment by asking students what equipment they know of that helps workers move or lift material. Summarize by saying that materials-handling equipment comes in two varieties: non-motorized and motorized. . Materials Handling (cont.)
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 –11:30) - 5 10 min. Distribute vocabulary cards for materials-handling equipment: Non-motorized (usually): Motorized * Wheelbarrows * Powered wheelbarrow * Hand trucks * Concrete mule * Material carts * Industrial forklift * Roller skids * Rough terrain forklift * Jacks * Freight elevator * Pallet jacks * Pipe mules * Pipe transports
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 –11:30) - 6 Assign each Team 2 or 3 terms to teach and allow 8 minutes to prepare for presenting at about 1.5 minutes per term. Information for card back should include 20 min. Have Teams present terms. Name Care/safety Purpose How to remember
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 –11:30) - 7 15 min. Give Work Teams 5 minutes to study all vocabulary cards to date. Use the balance of the period to play Darts. Put up the magnetic dart board. Line the class up in Work Teams. Give a definition from the vocabulary cards. The first team member at the very front of the line to respond correctly with the term defined may throw a dart for points. Teams get one point for the correct answer and additional points based on where the dart lands on the dartboard. Team members at the front of the line move to the back of the line. Reflection
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 –11:30) - 8 15 min. Give Work Teams 5 minutes to study all vocabulary cards to date. Use the balance of the period to play Darts. Put up the magnetic dart board. Line the class up in Work Teams. Give a definition from the vocabulary cards. The first team member at the very front of the line to respond correctly with the term defined may throw a dart for points. Teams get one point for the correct answer and additional points based on where the dart lands on the dartboard. Team members at the front of the line move to the back of the line. Reflection
  • Week Five: Day 22 (Tuesday) Third and Fourth Hours (9:40 –11:30) - 9 Remind non-residential students that they can check out a tape measure. 5 min. Homework review. Divide the class into five teams numbered Team 1 through Team 5. Tell the teams that they may adopt their own team name but to remember the number designation for performance purposes. Hand out Resource 5.16 - The Standards System Student Copy and Resource 5.17 - Meters, Liters, and Grams Student Copy. Explain that each team will develop a rap for both of these sets of lyrics. Note that some of the lyrics are missing and that their notes and study sheets on Metric and Standard measure will likely help them fill in the words. Tell students that two Teams will each perform one rap of their choosing tomorrow. Remind them that class members will be listening closely to their fine performances and to make sure that all of the lyrics are correct. Out the door:Model Notes,Reflection, binders on the shelf, shake hands.
  • END If you continue to click forward, you will see links to presentations of similar content available through slideshare.com Content prepared for the National Office of Job Corps through Contract No. DOLJ111A21695 Job Corps Professional Development Support - KUCRL