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  • Can you think of who are the greatest leaders of all time? What did they have in common? Persuasion is the ability to influence others to accept your point of view.
  • Claim messages are often routine—the basis for the claim is a guarantee or some other assurance that an adjustment will be made without the need of persuasion. Persuasion is only needed when an immediate remedy is doubtful. Persuasive claims should use an  inductive sequence. Start your claim with a specific detail that immediately engages the audience. Follow up that detail with several further ideas that all support the main detail.  Describe a problem, state something unexpected, suggest audience benefits, or ask a stimulating question to gain the audience’s attention.  Explain logically and concisely the purpose of the request. Prove its merit with facts, statistics, expert opinions, examples, specific details, and direct and indirect benefits. Reduce resistance by anticipating objections, offering counterarguments, establishing credibility, demonstrating competence, and showing the value of your proposal.  Ask for a particular action. Make the action easy to take and show courtesy, respect, and gratitude.
  • Persuasive requests aim to influence audiences who are inclined to resist. Compared to direct requests, they are usually longer, more detailed, and depend heavily on strategic planning. Although their purpose is to get favorable action, the messages invite action only after attempting to create the desire to take action and providing a logical argument to overcome any anticipated resistance. I’ll be discussing the  AIDA approach to persuasive requests,  claim requests, and  favors.
  • The AIDA approach describes the process of persuasion. First you need to  attract the audience’s ATTENTION. Convince the audience from the start that you have something useful or interesting to say. Do not begin by introducing yourself; grab their attention first. Make the opening statement brief and engaging without making extravagant claims. Next,  arouse the audience’s INTEREST so that they will continue to listen. This is your opportunity to explain the relevance of the message to your audience. Continue the theme that you started with when you grabbed the audience’s attention. You need the audience to think. Then,  create the DESIRE to help. How will the audience benefit from doing what’s being asked of them? Finally,  make clear the ACTION the audience needs to take. This is a good opportunity for one last reminder of the main benefit the audience will realize from the action you want. Tell the audience what to do to help. Always end with appreciation and state what it is that you’re grateful for.
  • Claim messages are often routine—the basis for the claim is a guarantee or some other assurance that an adjustment will be made without the need of persuasion. Persuasion is only needed when an immediate remedy is doubtful. Persuasive claims should use an  inductive sequence. Start your claim with a specific detail that immediately engages the audience. Follow up that detail with several further ideas that all support the main detail.  Describe a problem, state something unexpected, suggest audience benefits, or ask a stimulating question to gain the audience’s attention.  Explain logically and concisely the purpose of the request. Prove its merit with facts, statistics, expert opinions, examples, specific details, and direct and indirect benefits. Reduce resistance by anticipating objections, offering counterarguments, establishing credibility, demonstrating competence, and showing the value of your proposal.  Ask for a particular action. Make the action easy to take and show courtesy, respect, and gratitude.
  • Favor requests for time, money, information, special privileges, and cooperation require persuasion.  Begin your request for a favor by complimenting your listener—this sets the stage for the favor that will follow.  Explain your rationale for the favor and include discussion of benefits to the audience.  Be sure to show gratitude for the audience’s response and actions in response to your request.
  • In conclusion, persuasion is the ability to influence others to accept your point of view.  Planning is important to the persuasion process. Know the product, service, or idea, know your audience, and know your desired action. Persuasive requests aim to influence audience who are inclined to resist.  Know that you need to attract attention, build interest, create desire, and motivate action for the persuasive process.  Claims should be inductive; ensure that all supporting material back up your main detail.  A favor is an action in which there is little reward, time, or inclination for the audience; therefore, ask the audience gracefully.

Persuasion(2) Persuasion(2) Presentation Transcript

  • Persuasive Messages Sed Masic & Alicia Wicks
  • Persuasion
  • HOW?– PLAN KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE IDENTIFY DESIRED ACTION
  • Persuasive Requests• AIDA approach• Claim requests• Favors
  • AIDA Approach toClick to edit the outline  Persuasion• Attract attention text format• Arouse interest − Second Outline• Create a desire to help Level• Motivate action Third Outline Level − Fourth Outline Level
  • Claim Requests Click to edit the outline• Use inductive sequences text format• Capture audience attention − Second Outline• Build interest & reduce Level resistance• Motivate Action Third Outline Level − Fourth Outline Level
  • Asking a Favor Click to edit the outline• Begin with a compliment text format• Explain your rationale − Second Outline• Show gratitude Level Third Outline Level − Fourth Outline Level
  • Summary• Planning• AIDA• Persuasive claims• FavorsAny questions??