The one minute manager

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The one minute manager

  1. 1. The One Minute Manager KennethBlanchard&SpencerJohnson The One-Minute Manager by KennethBlanchard&SpencerJohnson Booksby KennethH.Blanchard,Ph.D.MANAGEMENT OFORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR:UTILIZINGHUMAN RESOURCES (withPaul Hersey). ORGANIZATIONALCHANGETHROUGH EFFECTIVELEADERSHIP (withRobertH.Guestand Paul Hersey). THE FAMILY GAME: A SITUATIONALAPPROACHTOEFFECTIVEPARENTING(withPaul Hersey). PUTTING THE ONEMINUTE MANAGER TO WORK (withRobertLorber,Ph.D.). Booksby SpencerJohnson,M.D. THE ONEMINUTE FATHER THE ONEMINUTE MOTHER THE PRECIOUSPRESENT: THE GIFT THAT MAKES A PERSON HAPPYFOREVER THE VALUE TALE SERIES: THE VALUE OFBELIEVING IN YOURSELF, The Storyof LoutsPasteur THE VALUE OFPATIENCE,The Story of the WrightBrothers THE VALUE OFKINDNESS,The Storyof ElizabethFry THE VALUE OFHUMOR, The Storyof Will Rogers THE VALUE OFCOURAGE, The Storyof Jackie Robinson THE VALUE OFCURIOSITY, The Story of ChristopherColumbus THE VALUE OFIMAGINATION,The Storyof CharlesDickens THE VALUE OFSAVING,The Storyof BenjaminFranklin THE VALUE OFSHARING,The Storyof the Mayo Brothers THE VALUE OFHONESTY, The Story of Confucius THE VALUE OFUNDERSTANDING,The Story of Margaret Mead THE VALUE OFFANTASY,The Story of Hans ChristianAnderson Most Berkleybooksare available atspecial quantitydiscountsforbulk purchasesor salespromotions,premiums,fundraising,oreducational use.Special booksorbookexcerptscanalsobe createdto fit specificneeds.
  2. 2. For details,write ortelephoneSpecialMarkets,The BerkleyPublishing Group, 200 MadisonAvenue,NewYork,New York10016; (212) 951-8800. “All managersandexecutivescaneasilyuse The One Minute Managerto buildamore efficient organization.Those whohave triedit,like it.“ROY ANDERSON,Chairmanof the Board& Chief Executive Officer,LockheedCorp.
  3. 3. The One Minute Manager KennethBlanchard&SpencerJohnson “Not since Up the Organizationhave Ireadsuch a straightforward,innovative bookasThe One Minute Manager. Shouldbe commandreadingforeveryrestauranteurandhotelierinthe country.”DONALDI. SMITH, Director,School of Hotel,RestaurantandInstitutional Management,College of Business, MichiganState University “Quite simply,The One Minute Managercan helpanyman eagerto assisthispeople tobecome peak performers.Iinclude itinall myworkwithAmericancorporationsseekingtoimprove productivity, profitabilityandperformance.”CHARLESA.GARFIELD,Ph.D.,President,PEAKPerformanceCenter; Clinical Professor,Universityof California,Berkeley “In government,criticizingperformance hasbecome the dominantmanagementtechnique.The One Minute Man ager's approach of catching someone doingsomethingrightwouldbe farmore effective.” DAVIDC. JONES,General,U.S.A.E,Retired,FormerChairman,The JointChiefsof Staff “The bestmanagementbookI've read.Icouldn'tputit down.I've boughtcopiesforall my key managers,andnow theyare doingthe same for theirpeople.”JEREW.THOMPSON,PresidentThe SouthlandCorporation7-ElevenConvenience Stores “Finallythere isashort,readable,practical guide toeffective management!We have more thana thousandcopiesof The One Minute Manager available toourmanagers.”ERNEST E. RENAUD,President & Chief Executive Officer,Jerrico,Inc. “I believeThe One Minute Managershouldbe made 'standardissue'at all managementdevelopment trainingprogramsfromnewmanagers'school to advancedmanagementtraining.Itembodies(inan easy-to-readform) the fundamental principlesof people managementwe are tryingtoinstill inour managementteam.Ihave made itrequiredreadingforall ourmanagers.” DAVIDHANNA,President GRiD SystemsCorporation “Buyingcopiesof The One Minute Manager isone of the bestinvestmentsI've made inmyself andin our managers.”LOUIS P.NEEB, PresidentFastFoodDivision,W.R.Grace & Co.(formerlyChairmanof the Board, BurgerKingCorp.) “Shouldyouapplyone-minute management?Yes!“WORKINGWOMAN “The One Minute Manager... don't missit!”MERV GRIFFIN ““Our managersare usingThe One Minute Manager's practical methodinour "Yellow Pages'operation all overthe world.There isno doubtaboutit it works!”R. W. BUTLER, President,GTEDirectories Corporation
  4. 4. “Our whole managementhasprofitedfromreadingThe One Minute Manager.” MICHAEL D. ROSE, President&Chief Executive Officer,HolidayInn,Inc. “I gave copiesto myboss,my subordinates,otherrefinerymanagers,andeventomywife,ourclose friendsandourclergy.It has that kindof broadappeal and it'sthat good!” ROBERT W. DAVIS,President ChevronChemical Company The One Minute Manager KennethBlanchard&SpencerJohnson “Thisbook showsushowto manage our encounterswithpeopleinsucha waythat everyone benefits!Veryenlightening!”EARLNIGHTINGALE,Radiocommentator OUR CHANGINGWORLD ThisBerkleybookcontainsthe complete textof the original hardcoveredition. THE ONEMINUTE MANAGER A BerkleyBook/publishedbyarrangementwithWilliamMorrow andCompany,Inc. PRINTINGHISTORY WilliamMorrowandCompanyeditionpublished1982 Berkleytrade paperbackedition / October1983 All rightsreserved.Copyright1981, 1982 by BlanchardFamilyPartnershipandCandle Communications Corporation.Thisbookmaynot be reproducedinwhole orinpart, bymimeographorany othermeans, withoutpermission.Forinformationaddress:WilliamMorrow andCompany,Inc.105 Madison Avenue, NewYork,NewYork 10016. ISBN:0-425-09847-8 A BERKLEY BOOK TM 757,375 BerkleyBooksare publishedbyThe BerkleyPublishingGroup,200 MadisonAvenue,New York,New York 10016. The name BERKLEY and the B logoare trademarksbelongingtoBerkleyPublishing Corporation. PRINTEDIN THE UNITED STATES OFAMERICA 50 49 48
  5. 5. The One Minute Manager KennethBlanchard&SpencerJohnson
  6. 6. Contents The Symbol The One Minute Manager'ssymbol a one minute readoutfromthe face of a moderndigital watchis intendedtoremindeachof usto take a minute outof our dayto lookintothe facesof the people we manage.Andto realize that theyare our most importantresources. Introduction In thisbrief story,we presentyouwithagreat deal of whatwe have learnedfromourstudiesin medicine andinthe behavioral sciencesabouthow people workbestwithotherpeople.Bybest,we meanhowpeople produce valuable results,andfeelgoodaboutthemselves,the organizationandthe otherpeople withwhomtheywork.Thisallegory,The One Minute Manager,isa simple compilationof whatmany wise people have taughtusandwhatwe have learnedourselves.We recognize the importance of these sourcesof wisdom. We alsorealize thatthe peoplewhoworkwithyouastheir managerwill looktoyouas one of theirsourcesof wisdom. We trust,therefore,that youwill take the practical knowledge yougainfromthisbook anduse it inyourdaily management. Forasthe ancient sage,Confucius,adviseseachof us:The essence of knowledgeis,havingit,touse it.We hope youenjoy usingwhatyou learnfromThe One Minute Manager and that,as a result,youandthe people you work withwill enjoy healthier,happierandmore productive lives.
  7. 7. The Search ONCEthere was a brightyoungman whowas lookingforaneffective manager.He wantedtoworkfor one.He wantedtobecome one.Hissearchhad takenhimovermanyyears tothe far cornersof the world.He had beeninsmall townsandinthe capitalsof powerful nations.He hadspokenwithmany managers:withgovernmentadministratorsandmilitaryofficers,constructionsuperintendentsand corporate executives,universitypresidentsandshopforemen,utilitysupervisorsandfoundation directors,withthe managersof shopsandstores,of restaurants,banksand hotels,withmenand womenyoungandold.He hadgone intoeverykindof office,large andsmall,luxuriousandsparse,with windowsandwithout.He wasbeginningtosee the full spectrumof how people manage people.Buthe wasn'talwayspleasedwithwhathe saw.He had seenmanytoughmanagerswhose organizations seemedtowinwhile theirpeople lost.Some of theirsuperiorsthoughttheywere goodmanagers.Many of theirsubordinatesthoughtotherwise.Asthe mansat ineach of these toughpeople'sooffices,he asked,Whatkindof a managerwouldyousay youare? Theiranswersvariedonlyslightly. I'm an autocratic managerI keepontopof the situation,he wastold. A bottom-line manager.Hard-nosed.Realistic.Profit-minded.He heardthe pride intheirvoicesand theirinterestinresults.The manalsometmanynice managerswhose peopleseemedtowinwhiletheir organizationslost.Some of the peoplewhoreportedtothemthoughttheywere goodmanagers.Those to whomtheyreportedhadtheirdoubts.Asthe man sat andlistenedtothese nice people answerthe same question,he heard, I'm a democraticmanager.Participative.Supportive.Considerate.Humanistic. He heardthe pride intheirvoicesandtheirinterestinpeople.Buthe wasdisturbed.Itwasas though mostmanagersin the worldwere primarilyinterestedeitherinresultsorinpeople.The managerswho were interestedinresultsoftenseemedtobe labeledautocratic,while the managersinterestedin people were oftenlabeleddemocratic.The youngmanthoughteachof these managersthe tough autocrat and the nice democratwere onlypartiallyeffective.It'slike beinghalf amanager,he thought. He returnedhome tiredanddiscouraged.He mighthave givenuphissearchlongago,buthe hadone great advantage.He knewexactlywhathe waslookingfor. Effective managers,he thought,manage themselvesandthe people theyworkwithsothatboththe organizationandthe people profitfromtheirpresence.The youngmanhadlookedeverywhereforan effectivemanagerbuthadfoundonlya few.The few he didfindwouldnotshare theirsecretswithhim. He beganto thinkmaybe he wouldneverfindoutwhatreallymade aneffectivemanagertick.Thenhe beganhearingmarvelousstoriesaboutaspecial managerwholived,ironically,inanearbytown.He
  8. 8. heardthat people likedtoworkforthisman and that theyproducedgreatresultstogether.The young man wonderedif the storieswerereallytrue and,if so,whetherthismanagerwouldbe willingtoshare hissecretswithhim. Curious,he telephonedthe special manager'ssecretaryforanappointment.The secretaryputhim throughimmediately.The youngmanaskedthisspecial managerwhenhe couldsee him.He heard,Any time thisweekisfine,exceptWednesdaymorning.Youpickthe time.The youngmanquietlychuckled because thissupposedlymarvelousmanagersoundedlike akooktohim.What kindof manager hadthat kindof time available?Butthe youngmanwasfascinated.He wenttosee him. WHEN the youngman arrivedat the manager'soffice,he foundhimstandingandlookingoutof the window.Whenthe youngmancoughed,the managerturnedandsmiled.He invitedthe youngmanto sitdownand asked:What can I do foryou? The youngman said,I'd like toaskyou some questions abouthow youmanage people.The managerwillinglysaid,Fireaway. Well,tobeginwith,do youholdregularlyscheduledmeetingswithyour subordinates? Yes,I do once a weekonWednesdaysfrom9:00 to 11:00. That's why I couldn'tsee you then,responded the manager. What do youdo at those meetings?probedthe youngman. I listenwhilemypeoplereviewandanalyze whattheyaccomplishedlastweek,the problemstheyhad, and whatstill needstobe accomplished.Thenwe developplansandstrategiesforthe nextweek. Are the decisionsmade atthose meetingsbindingonbothyouandyour people?questionedthe young man. Of course theyare,insistedthe manager.Whatwouldbe the pointof havingthe meetingif they weren't? Thenyou are a participative manager,aren'tyou?askedthe youngman. On the contrary,insistedthe manager,Idon't believe inparticipatinginanyof my people'sdecision- making. Thenwhat isthe purpose of your meetings? I alreadytoldyouthat, he said.Please,youngman,donotask me to repeatmyself. It isa waste of my time andyours. We're here to getresults,the managercontinued.The purpose of thisorganizationis efficiency.By beingorganizedwe are a greatdeal more productive. Oh,so you're aware of the needforproductivity.Thenyou're more results-orientedthanpeople- oriented,the youngmansuggested.
  9. 9. No the managerresounded,startlinghisvisitor.Ihearthat all toooften.He got to hisfeetandbeganto walkabout.How onearth can I get resultsif it'snotthroughpeople?Icare aboutpeople andresults. Theygo hand inhand. Here,youngman,lookat this.The managerhandedhisvisitoraplaque.Ikeepitonmy deskto remind me of a practical truth. People Who Feel Good About Themselves Produce Good Results As the youngman lookedatthe plaque,the managersaid,Thinkaboutyourself.Whendoyouwork best?Is itwhenyoufeel goodaboutyourself?Orwhenyoudon't?The youngman noddedashe began to see the obvious.Igetmore done whenI'mfeelinggoodaboutmyself,he responded. Of course youdo,the manageragreed.Andsodoeseveryone else.The youngmanraisedhisindex fingerwithnew-foundinsight.So,he said,helpingpeople tofeel goodaboutthemselvesisakeyto gettingmore done. Yes,the manager agreed.However, rememberproductivityismore thanjustthe quantityof workdone. It isalso the quality.He walkedovertothe window andsaid, Come overhere,youngman.He pointedto the trafficbelowandasked,Doyou see how manyforeigncarsthere are on the road? The youngman lookedoutat the real world,andsaid,I see more of themeveryday.AndIguessthat's because they're more economical andtheylastlonger.The managernoddedreluctantlyandsaidExactly.Sowhydo you thinkpeople are buyingforeigncars?Because Americanmanufacturersdidnotmake enoughcars?Or, the managersaid withoutinterrupting,because theydidnotmake the qualitycarthe Americanpublic reallywanted? Nowthat I thinkof it,the youngmananswered,it'sa questionof qualityandquantity. Of course,the manageradded.Qualityissimplygivingpeoplethe productorservice theyreallywant and need.The oldermanstoodat the window lostinhisthoughts.He couldremember,notsolongago, whenhiscountryprovidedthe technologythathelpedtorebuildEurope andAsia.Itstill amazedhim that Americahadfallensofar behindinproductivity.The youngmanbroke the manager's concentration.I'mremindedof anad I saw on television,the visitorvolunteered.Itshowedthe name of the foreigncar, andoverit came the wordsIf you're goingto take outa long-termcarloan,don'tbuy a short-termcar The managerturnedand saidquietly,I'mafraidthat'sa rather goodsummary.Andthat's the whole point.Productivityisbothquantityandquality.The managerandhisvisitorbegantowalk back towardsthe couch. Andfrankly,the bestwayto achieve bothof these resultsisthroughpeople.
  10. 10. The young man'sinterestincreased.Ashe satdown,he asked,Well,you've alreadysaidthatyou're not a participative manager.Justhowwouldyoudescribeyourself? That's easy,he respondedwithouthesitation.I'maOne Minute Manager.The young man'sface showed surprise.He'dneverheardof a One Minute Manager. You're a what?The managerlaughedandsaid,I'ma One Minute Manager.I call myself that because it takesverylittle time forme toget verybigresultsfrompeople.Althoughthe youngmanhadspoken withmanymanagers,he had neverheardone talklike this.Itwashard to believe.A One Minute Manager someone whogetsgoodresultswithouttakingmuchtime.Seeingthe doubtonhisface the managersaid,You don'tbelieve me,doyou?Youdon'tbelieve thatI'ma One Minute Manager. I mustadmitit's hard for me eventoimagine,the youngmanresponded.The managerlaughedand said,Listen,you'dbettertalktomy people if youreallywanttoknow whatkindof managerI am. The managerleanedoverandspoke intothe office intercom.Hissecretary,Ms.Metcalfe,came inmoments laterand handedthe youngmana sheetof paper. Those are the names,positionsandphone numbersof the six peoplewhoreporttome the One Minute Manager explained. WhichonesshouldItalk toothe youngman asked. That's your decision,the managerresponded.Pickanyname.Talktoany one of them or all of them.Well, ImeanwhoshouldIstart with? I alreadytoldyou,I don'tmake decisionsforotherpeople,the managersaidfirmly.Make thatdecision yourself.He stoodupand walkedhisvisitortowardsthe door. You have askedme,notonce,but twice,tomake a simple decisionforyou.Frankly,youngman,Ifind that annoying.Donotask me to repeatmyself.Eitherpickaname and getstarted,or take your search for effective managementelsewhere.The visitorwas stunned.He wasuncomfortable,very uncomfortable.A momentof embarrassedsilence seemedlike aneternity.Thenthe One Minute Manager lookedthe youngmaninthe eye and said,You wantto know aboutmanagingpeople,andI admire that.He shookhisvisitor'shand. If you have any questionsaftertalkingtosome of mypeople,he saidwarmly,come backandsee me.I appreciate yourinterestanddesire tolearnhow tomanage.I would,infact,like togive youthe concept of the One Minute Manager as a gift.Someone gave ittome once andit's made all the difference tome. I wantyou to understanditfully.If youlike it,youmaywantto become aOne Minute Manager yourself someday.
  11. 11. Thank you,the youngman managed.He leftthe manager'soffice somewhatdumbfounded.Ashe passedthe secretaryshe saidunderstandingly,Ican see fromyourdazedlookthat you've already experiencedourOne Minute Manager.The youngmansaid veryslowly,still tryingtofigure thingsout,I guessI have. Maybe I can helpyou,Ms. Metcalfe said.I've phonedthe six people whoreporttohim.Five of themare here and theyhave eachagreedto see you.Youmay be betterable to understandour"One Minute Manager' afteryou've spokenwiththem.The youngmanthankedher,lookedoverthe listanddecided to talkto three of them:Mr. Trenell,Mr.Levyand Ms. Brown. The First Secret: One Minute Goals WHEN the youngman arrivedat Trenell's office,he foundamiddle-agedmansmilingathim.Well, you've beentosee the 'ole man."He's quite a guy,isn'the? He seemsthatway,the youngman responded. Didhe tell youaboutbeinga One Minute Manager? He sure did.It's nottrue,is it?askedthe youngman. You'd betterbelieve itis.Ihardlyeversee him. You meanyounevergetany helpfromhim?puzzledthe youngman. Essentiallyverylittle,althoughhe doesspendsome timewithme atthe beginningof a new taskor responsibility.That'swhenhe doesOne Minute Goal Setting One Minute Goal Setting.What'sthat?saidthe youngman.He toldme he wasa One Minute Manager, but he didn'tsay anythingaboutOne Minute Goal Setting. That's the firstof the three secretstoOne Minute Management,Trenell answered. Three secrets?othe youngmanasked,wantingtoknow more. Yes,saidTrenell.One Minute Goal Settingisthe firstone andthe foundationforOne Minute Management.Yousee,inmostorganizationswhenyouaskpeople whattheydoandthenasktheir boss,all too oftenyougettwodifferentlists.Infact,insome organizationsI've workedin,any relationshipbetweenwhatIthoughtmy jobresponsibilitieswere andwhatmybossthoughttheywere, was purelycoincidental.AndthenIwouldget introuble fornotdoingsomethingIdidn'teventhinkwas my job. Doesthat everhappenhere?askedthe youngman. No Trenell said.Itneverhappenshere.The One Minute Manageralwaysmakesitclearwhatour responsibilitiesare andwhatwe are beingheldaccountable for.
  12. 12. Justhow doeshe do that?the youngman wantedto know. Efficiently,Trenell saidwithasmile.Trenell begantoexplain.Once he hastoldme whatneedstobe done or we have agreedonwhat needstobe done,theneachgoal isrecordedonno more than a single page.The One Minute Manager feelsthata goal,and itsperformance standard,shouldtake nomore than 250 wordsto express.He insiststhatanyone be able toreadit withinaminute.He keepsacopy and I keepacopy so everythingisclearandsowe can both periodicallycheckthe progress. Do youhave these one-page statementsforeverygoal? Yes,answeredTrenell. Well,wouldn'tthere be alotof these one-page statementsforeachperson? No,there reallyaren't,Trenell insisted.The oldmanbelievesinthe 80-20 goal-settingrule.Thatis,80% of yourreallyimportantresultswill come from20% of yourgoals.So we onlydoOne Minute Goal Settingonthat 20%, that is,our keyareasof responsibilitymaybe three tosix goalsinall.Of course,in the eventa special projectcomesup,we setspecial One Minute Goals. Interesting,the youngmancommented.IthinkIunderstandthe importance of One Minute Goal Setting.Itsoundslike aphilosophyof 'nosurprises'everyoneknowswhatisexpectedfromthe beginning. Exactly,Trenell nodded. So isOne Minute Goal Settingjustunderstandingwhatyourresponsibilitiesare? The youngmanasked. No.Once we knowwhatour jobis,the manager alwaysmakessure we know whatgoodperformance is. In otherwords,performance standardsare clear.He showsuswhat he expects. How doeshe do thatshowyou whathe expects?askedthe youngman. Let me give youan example,Trenellsuggested. One of myOne Minute Goals wasthis:Identifyperformance problemsandcome up withsolutionswhich,whenimplemented,will turnthe situationaround. WhenI firstcame to workhere I spottedaproblemthatneededtobe solved,butIdidn'tknow whatto do.So I calledthe One Minute Manager.Whenhe answeredthe phone,Isaid,Sir,Ihave a problem. Before Icouldget anotherwordout,he said,Good!That's what you've beenhiredtosolve.Thenthere was a deadsilence onthe otherendof the phone. I didn'tknowwhatto do. The silence wasdeafening. Ieventuallystutteredout,But,but,Sir,Idon't knowhowto solve thisproblem. Trenell,he said,one of yourgoalsforthe future isforyou to identifyandsolve yourownproblems.But since youare new,come onup and we'll talk.
  13. 13. WhenI got up there,he said,Tell me,Trenell,whatyourproblemisbutputitin behavioral terms. Behavioral terms?Iechoed.Whatdoyou meanbybehavioral terms? I mean,the managerexplainedtome,thatI do not wantto hear aboutonlyattitudes orfeelings.Tell me what ishappeninginobservable,measurable terms. I describedthe problemthe bestIcould. He said,That's good,Trenell!Nowtellme whatyouwouldlike tobe happeninginbehavioralterms. I don't know,Isaid. Thendon't waste mytime,he snapped. I justfroze inamazementfora fewseconds.Ididn'tknow whatto do. He mercifullybroke the dead silence. If you can't tell me whatyou'd like tobe happening,he said,youdon'thave a problemyet.You're just complaining.A problemonlyexistsif there isadifference betweenwhatisactuallyhappeningandwhat youdesire tobe happening. Beinga quicklearner,IsuddenlyrealizedIknew whatIwantedto be happening.AfterItoldhim, he askedme to talkabout whatmay have causedthe discrepancybetweenthe actual andthe desired. Afterthat the One Minute Manager said,Well,whatare yougoingto do aboutit? Well,Icoulddo A,I said. If you didA,wouldwhatyou wantto happenactuallyhappen?He asked. No,I said. Thenyou have a lousysolution.Whatelse couldyoudo?he asked. I coulddo B, I said. But if youdo B, will whatyouwantto happenreallyhappen?He counteredagain. No,I realized. Then,that's alsoa bad solution,he said.Whatelse canyoudo? I thoughtaboutit for a couple of minutesandsaid,Icoulddo C. But if I do C, whatI wantto happen won'thappen,sothat is a bad solution,isn'tit? Right.You're startingto come around,the managerthensaid,witha smile onhisface.Is there anything else you coulddo?he asked. Maybe I couldcombine some of these solutions,Isaid. That soundsworthtrying,he reacted. In fact,if I doA thisweek,BnextweekandC intwo weeks,I'll have itsolved.That's fantastic.Thanksso much.You solvedmyproblemfor me.
  14. 14. He got veryannoyed.Ididnot,he interrupted,yousolvedityourself.Ijustaskedyouquestions questionsyouare able toask yourself.Now getoutof here andstart solvingyourownproblemsonyour time,notmine. I knewwhathe had done,of course.He'd shownme how to solve problemssothatI coulddo it on my ownin the future. Thenhe stood,lookedme straightinthe eye andsaid,You're good,Trenell. Rememberthatthe nexttime youhave a problem. I remembersmilingasIlefthisoffice.Trenell leanedbackinhischairand lookedasif he were reliving hisfirstencounterwiththe One Minute Manager. So,the youngman began,reflectingonwhathe hadjust heard....One Minute Goals: Summary One Minute Goal Settingissimply 1. Agree on yourgoals. 2. See what goodbehaviorlookslike. 3.Write out eachof your goalsona single sheetof paperusinglessthan250 words. 4.Readand re-readeachgoal,whichrequiresonlyaminute orso eachtime youdo it. 5.Take a minute everyonce inawhile outof your dayto lookat your performance,and 6.See whetherornot yourbehaviormatchesyourgoal. That's it,Trenell exclaimed,you're afastlearner. Thank you,the youngman said,feelinggoodabouthimself.Butletme justjotthat down,he said,Iwant to rememberthat.Afterthe youngmanwrote brieflyinthe small blue notebookhe carriedwithhim,he leanedforwardandasked,If One Minute Goal Settingisthe firstsecretto becomingaOne Minute Manager, whatare the othertwo? Trenell smiled,lookedathiswatchandsaid,Why don't youask Levythat? Youare scheduledtosee him thismorningtoo,aren't you?The youngman was amazed. How didTrenell knowthat?Yes,the youngmansaidas he rose to shake Trenell'shand. Thanksso much foryour time,sir. You're welcome Trenell answered.Time isone thingIhave a lotmore of now.Asyou can probablytell,I'mbecomingaOne Minute Manager myself.
  15. 15. The Second Secret: One Minute Praisings As the youngman leftTrenell's office,he wasstruckbythe simplicityof whathe hadheard.He thought, It certainlymakessense.Afterall,howcanyoube an effectivemanagerunlessyouandyourpeople are sure of whattheyare beingaskedtodo.And whatan efficientwaytodo it. The youngmanwalkedthe lengthof the buildingandtookthe elevatortothe secondfloor.Whenhe gotto Mr. Levy'soffice,he was surprisedtomeetsoyounga man. Levywasprobablyinhislate 20's or early30's. Well,you've beentosee the 'ole man." He'squite a guy,isn'the?He was alreadygettingusedtothe One Minute Manager beingcalledquite aguy. I guesshe isrespondedthe youngman. Didhe tell youaboutbeinga One Minute Manager?askedLevy. He sure did.It's nottrue,is it?askedthe youngman, wonderingif he'dgetadifferent answerfrom Trenell's. You'd betterbelieve it'strue.Ihardlyeversee him. You meanyounevergetany helpfromhim?pursuedthe youngman. Essentiallyverylittle,althoughhe doesspendafairamountof time withme at the beginningof anew task or responsibility. Yes,I knowabout One Minute Goal Setting,interruptedthe youngman. ActuallyIwasn'tthinkingsomuch aboutOne Minute Goal Setting.Iwasreferringto One Minute Praisings. One Minute Praisings?echoedthe youngman.Are theythe secondsecrettobecoming aOne Minute Manager? Yes,theyare,Levy revealed.Infact,whenIfirststartedto workhere,the One Minute Manager made it veryclearto me whathe was goingto do. What was that?the visitorasked. He saidthat he knewthat itwouldbe a loteasierforme to dowell,if Igot crystal- clearfeedbackfrom himon howI was doing. He saidhe wantedme to succeed.He wantedme to be a big helptothe organization, andtoenjoymy work. He toldme that he wouldtry,therefore,toletme know inno uncertaintermswhenIwasdoingwell, and whenIwas doingpoorly. Andthenhe cautionedme thatitmightnot be verycomfortable atfirstfor eitherof us.
  16. 16. Why? the visitorasked. Because, ashe pointedouttome then,mostmanagersdon't manage that wayand people aren'tused to it.Thenhe assuredme that suchfeedbackwouldbe abighelpto me. Can yougive me an example of whatyouare talkingabout?the youngman requested. Sure,Levy complied.ShortlyafterIstartedto work,I noticedthat,aftermymanager had done One Minute Goal Settingwithme,he wouldstayinclose contact. What do youmeanby 'close contact'? askedthe youngman. There were twowaysthat he didit, explainedLevy.Firstof all,he observedmyactivitiesveryclosely.He neverseemedtobe veryfaraway.Secondly,he made me keepdetailedrecordsof myprogresswhich he insistedIsendtohim. That's interesting,saidthe youngman.Whydoeshe do that? At firstI thoughthe wasspyingand didn'ttrustme.That is, until Ifoundoutfrom some of the other people whoreporttohimwhathe wasreallydoing. What was that?the youngmanwantedto know. He wastryingto catch me doingsomethingrightLevysaid. Catch youdoingsomethingrightechoedthe youngman. Yes,respondedLevy.We have amotto aroundhere that says: HelpPeople ReachTheirFull Potential Catch ThemDoingSomethingRight Levycontinued,In mostorganizationsthe managersspendmostof theirtime catchingpeople doing what?he askedthe youngman.The youngmansmiledandsaidknowingly,Doingsomethingwrong. Right!saidLevy,Here we put the accent onthe positive.We catch people doingsomethingrightThe youngman made a fewnotesinhisnotebookandthenasked,Whathappens,Mr. Levy,whenthe One Minute Manager catchesyou doingsomethingright. That's whenhe givesyoua One Minute Praising,Levysaidwithsome delight. What doesthat mean?the youngman wantedtoknow. Well,whenhe hasseenthatyouhave done somethingright,he comesoverandmakescontact with you.That oftenincludesputtinghishandonyour shoulderorbrieflytouchingyouinafriendlyway. Doesn'tthat botheryou,the youngman wondered,whenhe touchesyou? No Levyinsisted.Onthe contrary,ithelps.Iknow he reallycaresaboutme and he wants me to prosper. As he says,The more consistentlysuccessful yourpeople are,the higheryourise inthe organization." Whenhe makescontact, it'sbrief,butit letsme know once againthat we're reallyon
  17. 17. the same side. Anyway,afterthat,Levycontinued,he looksyoustraightinthe eye andtellsyoupreciselywhatyoudid right.Thenhe shareswithyouhowgoodhe feelsaboutwhatyoudid I don't thinkI've everheardof a managerdoingthat, the youngman broke in. That must make youfeel prettygood. It certainlydoes,Levyconfirmed,forseveral reasons.Firstof all,Igeta praisingassoonas I've done somethingrightHe smiledandleanedtowardshisvisitor.Thenhe laughedandsaid,Idon'thave to wait for an annual performance review,if youknow whatImean.Both mensmiled. Second,since he specifiesexactlywhatIdidright,I know he'ssincere andfamiliarwithwhatIam doing. Third,he is consistent. Consistent?echoedthe youngman,wantingtoknow more. Yes,insistedLevy.He will praiseme if Iam performingwellanddeserveitevenif thingsare notgoing well forhimelsewhere.Iknowhe maybe annoyedaboutotherthings.Buthe respondstowhere Iam, not justto where he isat the time.AndI reallyappreciate that. Doesn'tall thispraisinghave totake upa lotof the manager'stime?the youngman asked. Notreally,saidLevy.Rememberyoudon'thave to praise someone forverylongforthemtoknowyou noticedandyoucare. It usuallytakeslessthanaminute. Andthat's whyit's calledaOne Minute Praising,the visitorsaid,ashe wrote downwhathe was learning. Right,Levysaid. Is he alwaystryingto catch youdoingsomethingright?the youngmanasked. No,of course not,Levyanswered.Justwhenyoufirststartworkhere or whenyoubegina new project or responsibility,thenhe does.Afteryougettoknow the ropes,he doesn'tseemtobe aroundmuch Why? the youngman wondered. Because youand he have otherwaysof knowingwhenyourjobperformance is'praise worthy."You bothcan reviewthe datainthe informationsystemthe salesfigures,expenditures,production schedules,andsoon.Andthen,Levyadded,afterawhile youbegintocatchyourself doingthingsright and youstart praisingyourself.Also,you're alwayswonderingwhenhe mightpraise youagainandthat seemstokeepyougoingevenwhenhe'snotaround.It'suncanny.I've neverworkedsohard at a job in my life. That's reallyinteresting,commentedthe youngman.SoOne Minute Praisingisa secrettobecominga One Minute Manager.
  18. 18. It is,indeed,Levysaidwithagleaminhiseye.He enjoyedwatchingsomeone learnthe secretsof One Minute Management.Asthe visitorlookedathisnotes,he quicklyreviewedwhathe hadlearnedabout the One Minute Praising. One Minute Praisings:Summary The One Minute Praisingworkswellwhenyou: 1.Tell people upfrontthatyouare goingto letthemknow how theyare doing. 2. Praise people immediately. 3.Tell people whattheydidrightbe specific. 4.Tell people howgoodyoufeel aboutwhattheydidright,andhow ithelps the organizationandthe otherpeople whoworkthere. 5.Stop fora momentof silence toletthemfee lohow goodyoufeel. 6. Encourage themto domore of the same. 7.Shake handsor touch people inaway thatmakesit clearthat yousupport theirsuccessinthe organization. What's the thirdsecret?the youngman askedanxiously.Levylaughedatthe visitor'senthusiasm,rose fromhis chairand said,Why don'tyou askMs. Brown?I understandyou're planningtotalkto her,too. Yes,I am, admittedthe youngman.Well,thanks somuchfor yourtime. That's OK,insistedLevy.Time isone thingIhave plentyof yousee I'ma One Minute Managermyself now.The visitorsmiled.He'dheardthatsomewherebefore.He wantedtoreflectonwhathe was learning.He leftthe buildingandtooka walkamongthe treesnearby.He was struckagain bythe simplicityandcommonsense of whathe hadheard. How can youargue withthe effectivenessof catchingpeople doingsomethingrightthe youngman thought,especiallyaftertheyknowwhattheyare todo and whatgoodperformance lookslike. But do One Minute Praisingsreallywork?he wondered.Doesall thisOne Minute Managementstuff reallygetresultsbottom-line results?Ashe walkedalonghiscuriosityaboutresultsincreased.Sohe returned tothe One Minute Manager's secretaryand askedMs. Metcalfe toreschedule hisappointment withMs. Brownfor some time the nextmorning. Tomorrowmorningisfine,the secretarysaidasshe hung upthe phone.Ms.Brownsaid to tell youto come any time exceptWednesdaymorning.Thenshe calleddowntownandmade the new appointment he requested.He wastosee Ms. Gomez,an official inthe headquartersoffice.Theyhave information there aboutall the differentplantsandlocationsinthe total company,Ms. Metcalfe saidina very knowingway.I'msure you'll findwhateveryou're lookingfor.He thankedherandleft.
  19. 19. The Appraisal AFTER lunchthe youngman wentdowntown.He metwithMs.Gomez,a competentlookingwomanin herearly40's. Gettingdownto business,the youngmanasked, Couldyouplease tell me whatisthe mostefficientandeffective of all youroperationsinthe country?I wantto compare itwiththe so-called"One Minute Manager's."oA momentlater,he laughed,ashe heardMs. Gomez say, Well,youwon'thave to lookveryfar,because itis the One Minute Manager's. He's quite aguy, isn'the?His operationisthe mostefficientandeffectiveof all of ourplants. That's unbelievable,saidthe youngman.Doeshe have the bestequipment?"." No,saidMs. Gomez.Infact, he'sgot some of the oldest. Well,there'sgotto be somethingwrongoutthere,saidthe youngman,still puzzledby the oldman's managementstyle.Tell me,doeshe lose alotof hispeople?Doeshe have alotof turnover? Come to thinkof it,Ms. Gomezsaid,he doeshave a lotof turnover. Aha,the youngman said,thinkinghe wasonto something. What happenstothose folkswhentheyleave the One Minute Manager?the youngmanwantedto know. We give themtheirownoperation,Ms.Gomezquicklyresponded.Aftertwoyearswithhim, theysay, "Who needsamanager?"He's our besttrainerof people.Wheneverwe have anopeningandneeda goodmanager,we call him.He alwayshas somebodywhoisready.Amazed,the youngmanthanked Ms. Gomezfor her time butthistime he got a differentresponse. I was gladI couldfityouin today,she said.The rest of my weekisreallyjammed.IwishIknew whatthe One Minute Manager's secretswere.I've beenmeaningtogooverthere and see him,butI justhaven't had time Smiling,the youngmansaid,I'll give youthose secretsasagiftwhenI findthemoutmyself. Justlike he'sgivingthemtome. That wouldbe a preciouspresent,Ms.Gomezsaidwitha smile.She lookedaroundhercluttered office and said,I coulduse whateverhelpIcanget.The youngman leftMs.Gomez'soffice andwalkedout ontothe street,shakinghishead.The One Minute Managerwasabsolutelyfascinatingtohim.That nightthe youngman had a veryrestlesssleep.He foundhimselfexcitedaboutthe nextdayabout learningthe thirdsecrettobecomingaOne Minute Manager. The Third Secret: One Minute Reprimands
  20. 20. THE nextmorninghe arrivedatMs. Brown's office atthe stroke of nine. A verysmartlydressedwomaninherlate 50's greetedhim.He gotthe usual,He'squite a guy,isn't he? routine,butbynowthe youngmanwas gettingtothe pointwhere he couldsincerelysay,Yes,he is. Didhe tell youaboutbeinga One Minute Manager?askedMs. Brown. That's all I've beenhearingabout,the youngmansaidlaughing.It'snot true,isit? he asked,still wonderingif he'dgeta differentanswer. You'd betterbelieve itis.Ihardlyeversee him. You meanyoudon't have much contact withhim, pursuedthe youngman,outside yourregularweekly meeting? Essentiallyverylittle.Exceptof course,whenIdosomethingwrong,saidMs.Brown. Shocked,the youngmansaid,You meanthe onlytime yousee the One Minute Manager iswhenyoudo somethingwrong? Yes. Well,notquite,saidMs.Brown,but almost. But I thoughta keymottoaround here wascatchingpeople doingthingsright. It isinsistedBrown.Butyouhave to know some thingsaboutme. What? askedthe youngman. I've beenworkinghere forquite afewyears.Iknow thisoperationinside andout.Asa result,the One Minute Manager doesn'thave tospendmuch time withme,if any,ongoal setting.Infact,I usuallywrite out mygoalsand sendthemoverto him. Is eachgoal ona separate sheetof paper?askedthe youngman. You bet.Nolongerthan 250 wordsand each one takesme or the One Minute Manager onlya minute to read. Anotherthingaboutme that's importantisthat I justlove mywork.As a result,Ido mostof myown One Minute Praisings.Infact,I believeif you're notforyourself,whois?A friendof mine toldme a mottoI'll alwaysremember:"If youdon'tblow yourownhorn, someone elsewill use itasa spittoon."o The young mansmiled.He likedhersense of humor.Doesyourmanagereverpraise you?he asked. Sometimeshe does,buthe doesn'thave todoit veryoftenbecause Ibeathimto the punch,answered Ms. Brown.WhenI do somethingespeciallygood,Imightevenaskthe One Minute Managerfor a praising. How wouldyoueverhave the nerve todothat? askedthe youngman. It's easy.Justlike makingabetwhere I eitherwinorI breakeven.If he givesme the praising,Iwin. But if he doesn't?the youngman broke in.
  21. 21. ThenI breakeven,respondedMs.Brown.Ididn'thave it before I asked.The youngmansmiledashe tooknote of Ms. Brown's philosophy,andthencontinued. You saidhe spendstime withyouwhenyoudosomethingwrong.Whatdoyou mean?askedthe young man. If I make a significantmistake,that'swhenIinvariablyget aOne Minute Reprimand,Ms.Brownsaid. A what?the startledyoungman asked. A One Minute Reprimand,Ms.Brownrepeated.That'sthe thirdsecretto becomingaOne Minute Manager. How doesitwork?wonderedthe youngmanoutloud. It's simple,saidMs.Brown. I figuredyou'dsaythat, saidthe youngman.Ms. Brownjoinedhislaughandexplained,If youhave been doinga jobfor some time andyou knowhow to do itwell,andyoumake a mistake,the One Minute Manager isquickto respond. What doeshe do? askedthe youngman. As soonas he has learnedaboutthe mistake he comestosee me.Firsthe confirmsthe facts.Thenhe mightput hishandon my shoulderormaybe justcome aroundto my side of the desk. Doesn'tthat botheryou?askedthe youngman. Sure,itdoes,because youknowwhat'scoming,especiallysince he doesn'thave a smile onhisface. He looksme straightinthe eye,she continued,andtellsme preciselywhatIdidwrong.Thenhe shares withme howhe feelsaboutithe'sangry,annoyed, frustratedorwhateverhe isfeeling. How longdoesthattake?askedthe youngman. Onlyabout30 secondsbutsometimesitseemsforevertome confidedMs.Brown. The visitorcouldn'thelpbutrememberthe feelingshe hadwhenthe One Minute Manager toldhimin nouncertaintermso how annoyedhe waswithhisindecision. Andthenwhat happens?the youngmanaskedas he movedtothe edge of hischair. He letswhathe saidsinkin witha fewsecondsof silence boy,doesitsinkinfo Thenwhat?the youngmanasked. He looksme squarelyinthe eye andletsme know how competenthe thinksIusuallyam.He makessure I understandthatthe onlyreasonhe is angrywithme is that he has so muchrespectfor me.He says he knowsthisisso unlike me.He sayshowmuch he looksforwardtoseeingme some othertime,aslongas
  22. 22. I understandthathe doesnot welcome thatsame mistake again.The youngmanbroke in.Itmust make youthinktwice. It certainlydoes,Ms.Brownnoddedvigorously.The youngmanknew whatMs. Brownwas talking about.He wastakingnotesnowas fast as he could.He sensedthatitwasn't goingtotake thiswoman longto coverseveral importantpoints. Firstof all,Ms. Brownsaid,he usuallygivesme the reprimandassoonas I've done somethingwrong. Second,since he specifiesexactlywhatIdidwrong,I know he is'on top of things'and that I'm not going to getaway withsloppiness.Third,since he doesn'tattackme as a persononlymybehaviorit'seasier for me not to become defensive.Idon'ttry to rationalize awaymymistake byfixingblame onhimor somebodyelse.Iknowhe isbeingfair.Andfourth,he isconsistent. Doesthat meanhe will reprimandyoufordoingsomethingwrong,evenif thingsare goingwellforhim elsewhere? Yes,she answered. Doesthe whole processreallytake onlyaminute?the youngmanasked. Usually,she said.Andwhenit'sover,it'sover.A One Minute Reprimanddoesn'tlastlongbutIcan guarantee you,youdon'tforgetit and youdon't usuallymake the same mistake twice. I thinkI knowwhatyou're talkingabout,the youngman said.I'mafraidI askedhim... I hope,she interrupted,youdidn'taskhimto repeathimself.The youngmanwasembarrassed.Ididohe confessed. Thenyou knowwhatit's like tobe on the receivingendof aOne Minute Reprimand,shesaid.AlthoughI expect,asa visitor,yougota rathermildone. I don't knowif you'dcall it mild,he said,butI don't thinkI'll askhimto repeathimself veryoften.That was a mistake. I wonder,the visitorsaidoutloud,if the One Minute Managerevermakesa mistake. He seemsalmosttooperfect Ms. Brown beganto laugh.Hardly,she said.Buthe doeshave a goodsense of humor.So whenhe does make a mistake,like forgettingtodothe lasthalf of the One Minute Reprimand,we pointitouttohim and kidhimaboutit. Afterwe've hadtime torecoverfromthe Reprimand,thatis.We might,forexample,phonehimlater and tell himwe knowwe were wrong.Thenwe mightlaughandask for the praisinghalf of the Reprimand,because we're notfeelingtoogood. Andwhat doeshe do then?the youngmanasked.
  23. 23. He usuallylaughsandsayshe'ssorry he forgotto remindme that I am an OKPerson You can laughabout praisingsandreprimands?the youngmanasked. Sure,Ms. Brown said.Yousee,the One Minute Manager has taughtus the value of beingable tolaugh at ourselveswhenwe make amistake.Ithelpsusgetonwithour work. That's terrific,the youngmanenthused.How didyoulearntodo that? Simply,Ms. Brownanswered,bywatchingthe bossdoit himself. You meanyour bosscan laughat himself whenhe makesamistake?The astonishedyoungmanasked. Well,notalways,Ms.Brown admitted.He'slike mostof us.Sometimesit'stough.Buthe oftencan. And whenhe doeslaughat himself,ithasapositive effectoneveryonearoundhim. He mustbe prettysecure,the youngman suggested. He isMs. Brown answered.The youngmanwasimpressed.He wasbeginningtosee how valuable sucha managerwas to an organization. Why doyou thinkthe One Minute Manager's reprimandsare soeffective?he asked. I'll letyouask the One Minute Manager, she said,as she rose frombehindthe deskandwalkedthe youngman to the door.Whenhe thankedherforher time,Ms.Brown smiledandsaid,Youknow what the response tothat isgoingto be.Theyboth laughed.He wasbeginningtofeellike aninsiderrather than a visitor,andthat feltgood.Assoonas he was inthe hall,he realizedhow littletime he'dspent withherand howmuch informationshe hadgivenhim.He reflectedonwhatshe hadsaid.It soundedso simple.He reviewedinhisownmindwhatyoushoulddowhenyoucatch an experiencedpersondoing somethingwrong. One Minute Reprimands:Summary The One Minute Reprimandworkswellwhenyou: 1.Tell people beforehandthatyouare goingto letthemknow how theyare doingandin no uncertain terms. 2. the firsthalf of the reprimand: a. Reprimandpeopleimmediately. b. Tell people whattheydidwrongbe specific. c.Tell people howyoufeelaboutwhattheydidwrongandin nouncertainterms. d.Stopfora fewsecondsof uncomfortablesilence toletthemfeelhow youfeel. 3.the secondhalf of the reprimand: a.Shake hands,or touchthemin a waythat letsthemknow youare honestlyontheirside.
  24. 24. b.Remindthemhowmuchyouvalue them. c.Reaffirmthatyouthinkwell of thembutnotof theirperformance in thissituation. 4.Realize thatwhenthe reprimandisover,it'sover. The young manmay not have believedinthe effectivenessof the One Minute Reprimandif he hadn't personallyexperienceditseffect.There wasnodoubtthathe feltuncomfortable.Andhe didnotwant to experience itagain.However,he knew that everyone made mistakesnow andthen,andthathe mightverywell receiveanotherreprimandsome day.Buthe knew if itcame fromthe One Minute Manager, that itwouldbe fair;that itwouldbe a commenton hisbehaviorandnoton hisworth as a person. As he headedtowardthe One Minute Manager'soffice,he keptthinkingaboutthe simplicityof One Minute Management.All three of the secretsmade sense One Minute Goals,One Minute Praisings,and One Minute Reprimands.Butwhydotheywork?He wondered.Whyisthe One Minute Managerthe mostproductive managerinthe company? The One Minute ManagerExplains WHEN he got to the One Minute Manager's,hissecretarysaid,You can go rightin.He's beenwondering whenyou'dbe back to see him.Asthe youngman enteredthe office,he noticedagainhow clearand uncluttereditwas.He wasgreetedbya warm smile fromthe One Minute Manager. Well,whatdidyoufindoutin yourtravels?he asked. A lot!the youngman saidenthusiastically. Tell me whatyou learned, the managerencouraged. I foundoutwhy youcall yourself aOne Minute Manager. Youset One Minute Goals withyourpeople to make sure theyknowwhattheyare beingheldaccountable for andwhatgoodperformance lookslike. You thentry to catch themdoingsomethingrightsoyoucan give thema One Minute Praising.Andthen, finally,if theyhave all the skillstodosomethingrightandtheydon't,yougive thema One Minute Reprimand. What do youthinkaboutall that? askedthe One Minute Manager. I'm amazedat howsimple itissaidthe youngman, and yetitworksyou getresults. I'm convincedthatitcertainlyworksforyou. Andit will foryoutoo,if you're willingtodoit,the managerinsisted. Perhaps,saidthe youngman,but I wouldbe more likelytodoitif I couldunderstandmore aboutwhyit works.
  25. 25. That's true of everyone,youngman.The more youunderstandwhyitworks,the more aptyou are to use it.I'd be happy,therefore,totell youwhatI know.Where doyouwant to start? Well,firstof all,whenyoutalkaboutOne Minute Management,doyoureallymeanittakesa minute to do all the kindsof thingsyouneedto doas a manager? No,not always.Itjustis a way to saythat beinga managerisnot as complicatedaspeople wouldhave youbelieve.Andalsomanagingpeople doesn'ttake aslongas you'dthink.So whenIsay One Minute Management,itmighttake more than a minute foreachof the keyelementslike goal setting,butit's justa symbolicterm.Andveryoftenitdoestake only aminute. Let me showyouone of the notesI keeponmy desk.Whenhe looked,the youngman saw: The Best Minute I SpendIsThe One I InvestInPeople It's ironic,the managersaid.Most companiesspend50% to 70% of theirmoneyonpeople'ssalaries. Andyettheyspendlessthan1% of theirbudgettotraintheirpeople.Mostcompanies,infact,spend more time and moneyonmaintainingtheirbuildingsandequipmentthantheydoonmaintainingand developingpeople. I neverthoughtof that,the youngmanadmitted.Butif people getresults,thenitcertainlymakesgood sense toinvestinpeople. Exactly,the managersaid.I wishI hadhad someone investinme soonerwhenIfirst wenttowork. What do youmean?the youngman asked. Well,inmostof the organizationsIworkedinbefore,Ioftendidn'tknow whatIwas supposedtobe doing.Noone botheredtotell me.If youaskedme whetherIwas doinga goodjob,I wouldsayeither"I don't know'or "I thinkso."If you askedwhyI thoughtso,I wouldreply,"Ihaven'tbeenchewedoutby my bosslately'or'no newsis good news."Itwasalmostas if my mainmotivationwastoavoid punishment. That's interesting,the youngmanadmitted.ButI'mnot sure I understandit.Thenhe addedanxiously, In fact,if it's all rightwithyou,maybe I couldunderstandthingsbetterif Icouldgetto some of my 'why' questions.Let'sstartwithOne Minute Goal Setting.Whydoesitworkso well? WhyOne Minute GoalsWork YOU wantto knowwhyOne Minute Goalswork,the managersaid.Fine.He gotup and beganto pace slowlyaroundthe room.
  26. 26. Let me give youan analogythat mighthelp.I've seenalotof unmotivatedpeople atworkinthe various organizationsI've beenemployedinoverthe years.ButI've neverseenanunmotivatedpersonafter work.Everyone seemstobe motivatedtodosomething. One night,forexample,IwasbowlingandIsaw some of the 'problememployees'atworkfrom mylast organization.One of the real problempeople,whoIrememberedall toowell,tookthe bowlingball and approachedthe line androlledthe ball.Thenhe startedtoscreamand yell andjumparound.Why do youthinkhe was so happy? Because he got a strike.He had knockeddownall the pins. Exactly.Whydon't youthinkhe and otherpeople are thatexcitedatwork? Because he doesn'tknowwhere the pinsare,smiledthe youngman.Igetit.How longwouldhe wantto bowl if there were nopins? Right,saidthe One Minute Manager. Now you can see whathappensinmostorganizations.Ibelieve that mostmanagersknowwhat theywanttheirpeople todo.Theyjustdon'tbotherto tell theirpeople ina waytheywouldunderstand.Theyassume theyshouldknow.Ineverassume anythingwhenit comesto goal setting. Whenyouassume that people knowwhat'sexpectedof them, youare creatinganineffectiveformof bowling.Youputthe pinsup butwhenthe bowlergoestoroll the ball,he noticesthere isa sheetacross the pins.So whenhe rollsthe ball,anditslipsunderthe sheet,he hearsacrack but doesn'tknow how manypinshe knockeddown.Whenyouaskhimhow he did,he says,I don'tknow.But it feltgood. It's like playinggolf atnight.A lotof my friendshave givenupgolf andwhenIaskedthemwhy,they said,"Because the coursesare too crowded."WhenIsuggestedthattheyplayat night,theylaughed because whowouldeverplaygolf withoutbeingable tosee the pins? It's the same withwatchingfootball.How manypeople inthiscountrywouldsitinfrontof theirTV'son a SundayafternoonorMonday nightand watchtwo teamsrun up anddownthe fieldif there wereno goalsto shootat or anyway to score? Yeah!Why isthat? askedthe youngman. It's all because clearlythe numberone motivatorof people isfeedbackonresults.Infact,we have anothersayinghere that'sworthnoting:"Feedbackisthe Breakfastof Champions."Feedbackkeepsus going.Unfortunately,however,whenmostmanagersrealizethatfeedbackonresultsisthe numberone motivatorof people,theyusuallysetupathirdform of bowling. Whenthe bowlergoestothe line toroll the ball,the pinsare still upand the sheetisinplace but now there isanotheringredientinthe game a supervisorstandingbehindthe sheet.Whenthe bowlerrolls
  27. 27. the ball,he hearsthe crash of the fallingpins,andthe supervisorholdsuptwofingerstosignifyyou knockeddowntwopins.Actually,domostmanagerssayyougot two? No,the youngman smiled.Theyusuallysayyoumissed eight. Righton! saidthe One Minute Manager. The questionIalwaysusedtoask waswhy doesn'tthe manager 'liftthe sheetup'so bothhe andhis subordinate cansee the pins.Why?Because he hasthe great AmericantraditionPerformance Reviewcomingup. Because he has Performance Review comingup?wonderedthe youngman. Right.I usedto call that "NIHYSOB'whichstandsfor "Now I have youSOB."Such managersdon't tell theirpeople whattheyexpectof them;theyjustleave themaloneandthen'zap' themwhentheydon't performat the desiredlevel. Why doyou suppose theywoulddothat?the youngman inquired,beingveryfamiliar withthe truthin the manager'scomments. So theycan lookgood,saidthe manager. What do youmean,so theycan lookgood?askedthe youngman. How doyou thinkyouwouldbe viewedbyyourbossif youratedeveryone thatreportedtoyouat the highestlevelonyourperformance review scale? As a 'softtouch,"as someone whocouldnotdiscriminate betweengoodperformance andpoor performance. Precisely,saidthe manager.Inordertolookgoodas a managerinmostorganizations,youhave tocatch some of your people doingthingswrong.Youhave tohave a few winners,afew losers,andeveryone else somewhere inthe middle.Yousee,inthiscountrywe have anormal-distribution-curvementality.I rememberone time whenvisitingmyson'sschool,Iobservedafifth-grade teachergivingastate capitalstestto herclass.WhenI askedher whyshe didn'tput atlasesaroundthe roomand letthe kids use themduringthe test,she said,"I couldn'tdothat because all the kidswouldget100 percent."As thoughit wouldbe badfor everyone todowell. I rememberonce readingthatwhensomeoneaskedEinsteinwhathisphone numberwas,he wentto the phone bookto lookitup. The youngman laughed.You're kidding. No,I'm not kidding.He saidhe neverclutteredhismindwithinformationhe couldfindsomewhereelse. Now,if youdidn'tknowbetter,the managercontinued,whatwouldyouthinkof someone whowentto the phone bookto lookuphis ownnumber?Wouldyouthinkhe wasa winneror a loser?The young man grinnedandsaid,A real loser.
  28. 28. Sure,the managerresponded.Iwould,too,butwe'dbe wrong,wouldn'twe?The youngmannodded hisagreement. It's easyfor anyof us to make thismistake,the managersaid.Thenhe showedhisvisitorthe plaque he had made forhimself.Lookatthis: Everyone Is A Potential Winner Some People Are DisguisedAsLosers, Don't Let TheirAppearancesFool You. You see,the managersaid,youreallyhave three choicesasa manager.First,youcan hire winners.They are hard to findandtheycost money.Or,second,if youcan't finda winner,youcanhire someone with the potential tobe a winner.Thenyousystematicallytrainthatpersontobecome awinner.If youare not willingtodoeitherof the firsttwo (andI am continuallyamazedatthe numberof managerswho won'tspendthe moneyto hire a winnerortake the time to trainsomeone tobecome a winner),then there isonlythe thirdchoice leftprayer.That stoppedthe youngmancold.He putdownhisnotebook and penand said, Prayer?The manager laughedquietly.That'sjustmyattemptat humor,youngman.But whenyouthink aboutit, there are many managerswhoare sayingtheirprayersdaily"Ihope thispersonworksout." Oh,the youngmansaid seriously.Well,let'stake the firstchoice.If youhire awinner,it'sreallyeasyto be a One Minute Manager,isn'tit? It sure is saidthe managerwitha smile. He wasamazedat how seriousthe youngman wasnow as thoughbeingmore seriousmade apersona bettermanager. All youhave to do witha winnerisdoOne Minute Goal Settingandletthemrunwiththe ball. I understandfromMs. Brown,sometimesyoudon'tevenhave todo thatwithher said the youngman. She'sabsolutelyrightsaidthe manager.She'sforgottenmore thanmostpeopleknow aroundhere.But witheveryone,winnerorpotential winner,One Minute Goal Settingisabasic tool forproductive behavior. I rememberonce readingthatwhensomeoneaskedEinsteinwhathisphone numberwas,he wentto the phone bookto lookitup. The youngman laughed.You're kidding. No,I'm not kidding.He saidhe neverclutteredhismindwithinformationhe couldfindsomewhereelse. Now,if youdidn'tknowbetter,the managercontinued,whatwouldyouthinkof someone whowentto the phone bookto lookuphis ownnumber?Wouldyouthinkhe wasa winneror a loser?The young man grinnedandsaid,A real loser.
  29. 29. Sure,the managerresponded.Iwould,too,butwe'dbe wrong,wouldn'twe?The youngmannodded hisagreement. It's easyfor anyof us to make thismistake,the managersaid.Thenhe showedhisvisitorthe plaque he had made forhimself.Lookatthis: Is ittrue that nomatter whoinitiatesthe One Minute Goal Setting,the youngmanasked,eachgoal alwayshasto be writtendownona single sheetof paper? Absolutely,insistedthe One Minute Manager. Why isthat so important? So people canreviewtheirgoals frequentlyandthenchecktheirperformance against those goals. I understandyouhave themwrite downonlytheirmajorgoalsandresponsibilitiesand noteveryaspect of theirjob,the youngmansaid. Yes.That's because I don'twant thisto be a paper mill.Idon'twant a lotof piecesof paperfiledaway somewhere andlookedatonlyonce a yearwhenit's time fornextyear'sgoal settingorperformance review,orsome suchthing. As youprobablysaw,everyone whoworksforme hasa plaque nearthemthat looks like this.He showedhisvisitorhiscopyof the plaque. Take A Minute: LookAtYour Goals LookAtYour Performance See If YourBehaviorMatchesYourGoals The young manwas amazed.He'dmissedthisinhisbrief visit.Ineversaw this,"he said.It'sterrific. CouldI getone of these plaques? Sure,the managersaid.I'll arrange it.Ashe waswritingdownsome of whathe waslearning,the aspiringmanagersaid,withoutliftinguphishead,Youknow,it'sdifficulttolearneverythingthere isto learnaboutOne Minute Managementinsuch a short time.There'scertainlymore I'dlike tolearnabout One Minute Goals,for instance,butmaybe Icoulddo that later. Couldwe move toOne Minute Praisingsnow?askedthe youngman,as he lookedup fromhisnotebook. Sure,saidthe One Minute Manager. You're probablywonderingwhythatworks,too. I certainlyam,the visitorresponded. WhyOne Minute PraisingsWork
  30. 30. LET'S lookat a fewexamples,the One Minute Managersaid.Maybe thenitwill be clearto youwhyOne Minute Praisingsworksowell. I'd like that,saidthe youngman. I'll start witha pigeonexampleandthenmove ontopeople,saidthe manager. Justrememberyoungman,people are notpigeons.Peopleare more complicated.Theyare aware,they thinkforthemselvesandtheycertainlydon'twanttobe manipulatedbyanotherperson.Remember that and respectthat.It isa keytogood management. Withthat in mind,letuslookat several simpleexampleswhichshow usthatwe all seekwhatfeelsgood to us and we avoidwhatfeelsbadtous. Suppose youhave anuntrainedpigeonthatyouwantto entera box in the lowerleft- handcornerand run across the box to the upperright-handcornerandpush a leverwithhisrightfoot.Suppose thatnot too far fromthe entrypointwe have a pelletmachine thatis,amachine that can release pelletsof food to rewardand reinforce the pigeon.Whatdoyou thinkisgoingto happenif we putthe pigeoninthe box and waituntil the pigeonrunsovertothe upperright-handcornerandpushesthe leverwithhis rightfoot before we give himanyfood?askedthe One Minute Manager. He wouldstarve todeath,respondedthe youngman. You're right.We're goingto lose a lotof pigeons.The pigeonisgoingtostarve todeathbecause he doesn'thave anyideawhat he is supposedtodo. Nowit's actuallynottoo hardto train a pigeontodo thistask.All youhave to do is todraw a line not too far fromwhere the pigeonentersthe box.If the pigeonentersthe box andcrossesthe line,bangthe pelletmachine goesoff, andthe pigeongetsfed.Prettysoonyouhave the pigeonrunningtothatspot, but youdon't wantthe pigeonthere.Where doyouwantthe pigeon? In the upperright-handcornerof the box,saidthe youngman. Right!the One Minute Manager confirmed.Therefore,afterawhile youstoprewardingthe pigeonfor runningto thatspot and drawanotherline whichisn'ttoofar fromthe last line,butisinthe directionof the goal the upperright-handcornerof the box.Now the pigeonstartsrunningaroundhisoldspotand doesn'tgetfed.Prettysoonthough,the pigeonmakesitacrossthe new line andbangthe machine goes off againand the pigeongetsfed. Thenyou drawanotherline.Againthisline hastobe inthe directionof the goal,butnottoo far away that the pigeoncan't make itagain.We keepsettingupthese linescloserandclosertothe upperright- handcorner of the box until we won'tfeedthe pigeonunlesshe hitsthe leverandthenfinallyonly whenhe hitsthe leverwithhisrightfoot.
  31. 31. Why doyou setup all these little goals?wonderedthe youngman. By settingupthese seriesof lines,we are establishinggoalsthatthe pigeoncanachieve.Sothe keyto trainingsomeone todoa newtask is,inthe beginning,tocatchthemdoingsomethingapproximately rightuntil theycan eventuallylearntodoitexactlyright. We use thisconceptall the time withkidsandanimals,butwe somehow forgetitwhenwe are dealing withbigpeople adults.Forexample,atsome of these SeaAquariumsyousee aroundthe country,they usuallyendthe showbyhavinga huge whale jumpoverarope whichishighabove the water.Whenthe whale comesdownhe drenchesthe firsttenrows. The people leave thatshowmumblingtothemselves”That'sunbelievable.How do they teachthat whale todo that?" Do youthinktheygo out inthe ocean ina boat, the managerasked,andput a rope outoverthe water and yell,"Up,up!"until a whale jumpsoutof the wateroverthe rope?And thensay,"Hey,let'shire him.He's a real winner." No,laughedthe youngman,but thatreallywouldbe hiringawinner.The twomenenjoyedthe laugh theyshared. You're rightthe managersaid.Whentheycapturedthe whale,he knew nothingaboutjumpingover ropes.Sowhentheybeganto trainhimin the large pool,where doyouthinktheystartedthe rope? At the bottomof the pool,answeredthe youngman. Of course!respondedthe manager.Everytime the whale swamoverthe rope which waseverytime he swampast he got fed.Soon,theyraisedthe rope a little. If the whale swamunderthe rope,he didn'tgetfedduringtraining.Wheneverhe swamoverthe rope, he got fed.So aftera while the whale startedswimmingoverthe rope all of the time.Thentheystarted raisingthe rope a little higher. Why dotheyraise the rope?askedthe young man. First,the managerbegan,because theywere clearonthe goal:to have the whale jumphighoutof the waterand overthe rope. AndsecondtheOneMinuteManagerpointedout,it'snotaveryexcitingshowforatrainertosay,"Folks,the whalediditagain."Everybodymaybelookinginthewaterbuttheycan'tseeanything.Overaperiodoftime theykeeponraisingtheropeuntiltheyfinallygetittothesurfaceofthewater.Nowthegreatwhaleknowsthat inordertogetfed,hehastojumppartiallyoutofthewaterandovertherope.Assoonasthatgoalisreached, theycanstartraisingtheropehigherandhigheroutof thewater. So that's howtheydo it,the youngman said.Well,Ican understandnow how using
  32. 32. that methodworkswithanimals,butisn'tita bitmuch to use it withpeople? No,it's verynatural infacto the managersaid.We all do essentiallythe same thingwiththe childrenwe care for.How do youthinkyouteach themto walk?Canyou imagine standingachildupandsaying "Walk,"and whenhe fallsdownyoupickhimupand spankhimand say,"I toldyou to walk."No,you standthe childupand the firstday he wobblesalittle bit,andyougetall excitedandsay,"He stood,he stood,"andyou hug andkissthe child.The nextday he standsfor a momentandmaybe wobblesastep and youare all overhimwithkissesandhugs. Finallythe child,realizingthatthisisa prettygooddeal,starts to wobble hislegsmore andmore until he eventuallywalks. The same thinggoesforteachinga childto speak.Suppose youwantedachildtosay,"Give me a glass of water,please."If youwaiteduntil the childsaidthe wholesentence before yougave heranywater, the childwoulddie of thirst.Soyoustart off bysaying"Water,water."All of a suddenone daythe child says,"Waller."Youjumpall overthe place,hug andkissthe child,getgrandmotheronthe phone sothe childcan say "Waller,waller."Thatwasn't'water,"butit was close. Nowyoudon't want a kidgoingintoa restaurantat the age of twenty-oneaskingforaglassof 'waller' so aftera while youonlyacceptthe word'water' and thenyoubeginon'please." These examplesillustrate thatthe mostimportantthingintrainingsomebodytobecome awinneristo catch themdoingsomethingrightinthe beginningapproximatelyrightandgraduallymovingthem towardsthe desiredbehavior.Withawinneryoudon'thave to catch themdoingthingsrightveryoften, because goodperformerscatchthemselvesdoingthingsrightandare able to be self-reinforcing. Is that whyyouobserve newpeoplealotinthe beginning,askedthe youngman,or whenyourmore experiencedpeopleare startinganewproject? Yes,the One Minute Manager said.Most managerswaituntil theirpeople dosomethingexactlyright before theypraise them.Asa result,manypeople nevergettobecome highperformersbecause their managersconcentrate oncatchingthemdoingthingswrongthat is,anythingthatfallsshortof the final desiredperformance.Inourpigeonexample,itwouldbe like puttingthe pigeoninthe box andnotonly waitinguntil he hitsthe levertogive himanyfoodbutputtingsome electricgrillsaroundthe box to punishhimperiodicallyjusttokeephimmotivated. That doesn'tsoundlike itwouldbe veryeffective,the youngmansuggested. Well,itisn't,agreedthe One Minute Manager.Aftergettingpunishedforawhile andnotknowingwhat acceptable behavioris(thatis,hittingthe lever),the pigeonwouldgointothe cornerof the box andnot move.To the pigeonitisa hostile environmentandnotworthtakingany risksin.
  33. 33. That is whatwe oftendowithnew,inexperiencedpeople.We welcome themaboard,take themaround to meeteverybody,andthenwe leave themalone.Notonlydowe notcatch themdoinganything approximatelyright,butperiodicallywe zapthemjusttokeepthemmoving.Thisisthe mostpopular leadershipstyle of all.We call itthe 'leave alone-zap'style.Youleave apersonalone,expectinggood performance fromthem,andwhenyoudon'tget it,youzap them. What happenstothese people?askedthe youngman. If you've beeninanyorganization,andI understandyou've visitedseveral,the managersaid,youknow, because you've seenthem.Theydoaslittle aspossible. Andthat's what's wrongwithmostbusinessestoday.Theirpeople reallydonotproduce eitherquantity or quality. Andmuch of the reasonforthispoor businessperformance issimplybecause the peopleare managed so poorly.The youngmanput hisnotebookdown.He thoughtaboutwhathe justheard.He was beginningtosee One Minute Managementforwhatitisa practical businesstool.Itwasamazingtohim howwell somethingassimple asthe One Minute Praisingworkedwhetheritwasinside oroutside the businessworld. That remindsme of some friendsof mine,the youngmansaid.Theycalledme andsaidthat they'd gottena newdog.Theyaskedme whatI thoughtof theirplannedmethodof trainingthe dog.The managerwas almostafraidto ask. How were theygoingtodo it? Theysaidif the doghad an accidenton the rug, theywere goingtotake the dog, shove hisnose init, poundhimon the butt witha newspaperandthenthrow the dogout thislittle window inthe kitchen intothe back yard where the dogwas supposedtodohisjob. I sure enjoya praisingmore thana reprimand,the youngmanlaughed. I thinkI understandnowwhyOne Minute GoalsandOne Minute Praisingswork.Theyreallydomake goodsense tome. Good,said the One Minute Manager. But I can't imagine whythe One Minute Reprimandworks,the youngmanwonderedoutloud. Let me tell youa fewthingsaboutit,saidthe One Minute Manager. WhyOne Minute ReprimandsWork THERE are several reasonswhythe One Minute Reprimandworkssowell.
  34. 34. To beginwith,the managerexplained,the feedbackinthe One Minute Reprimandisimmediate.Thatis, youget to the individualassoonas youobserve the 'misbehavior'oryourdata informationsystemtips youoff.It isnot appropriate togunnysackor save up negative feelingsaboutsomeone'spoor performance. The fact that the feedbackissoimmediateisanimportantlessoninwhythe One Minute Reprimand worksso well.Unlessdisciplineoccursasclose to the misbehavioraspossible,ittendsnottobe as helpful ininfluencingfuture behavior.Mostmanagersare 'gunnysack'discipliners.Thatis,theystore up observationsof poorbehaviorandthensome daywhenperformance review comesortheyare angry in general because the 'sackisso full,"theycharge inand'dump everythingonthe table."Theytellpeople all the thingstheyhave done wrongfor the lastfew weeksormonthsor more.The youngman breathed a deepsighandsaid,So true. Andthen,the One Minute Manager wenton,the managerand subordinate usuallyendupyellingat each otheraboutthe facts or simplykeepingquietandresentingeachother.The personreceivingthe feedbackdoesn'treallyhearwhathe orshe has done wrong.Thisisa versionof the 'leave alone-zap' formof discipline thatI've spokenaboutearlier. I rememberitwell,respondedthe youngman.ThatiscertainlysomethingIwanttoavoid. Absolutely,agreedthe manager.If managerswouldonlyintervene early,theycoulddeal withone behaviorata time andthe personreceivingthe disciplinewouldnotbe overwhelmed.Theycouldhear the feedback.That'swhyI thinkperformance review isan ongoingprocess,notsomethingyoudoonly once a year. So,one reasonthatthe One Minute Reprimandworksisthatthe personreceivingthe reprimandcan 'hear' the feedback,because whenthe managerdealswithone behaviorata time,itseemsmore fair and clear,the youngman summarized. Yes,the manager said.Andsecondly,whenIgive aOne Minute Reprimand,Ineverattacka person's worthor value as a person.Since theirOK-nessasapersonisnot 'up forgrabs," theydon'tfeel they have to defendthemselves.Ireprimandthe behavioronly.Thus,myfeedbackandtheirownreactionto it isaboutthe specificbehaviorandnottheirfeelingsaboutthemselvesashumanbeings. So often,whendiscipliningpeople,managerspersecute the individual.Mypurpose ina One Minute Reprimandistoeliminate the behaviorandkeepthe person. So that's whyyoumake the secondhalf of the reprimandapraising,the youngmansaid.Theirbehavior isnot OK.They are OK. Yes,agreedthe One Minute Manager.
  35. 35. Why wouldn'tyougive the praisingfirstandthenthe reprimand?suggestedthe youngman. For some reason,itjustdoesn'twork,insistedthe manager.Some people,know thatIthinkof it,say that I am Nice 'n' Tough as a manager.But to be more accurate, I'm reallyTough'n' Nice. Tough 'n' Nice,echoedthe youngman. Yes,insistedthe One Minute Manager.Thisisan oldphilosophythathasworkedwell forliterally thousandsof years. There is,infact, a story inancientChinathat illustratesthis.Once upon atime,anemperorappointeda secondincommand.He calledthisprime ministerinand,ineffect,saidtohim:Whydon't we divide up the tasks?Why don't youdo all the punishingandI'll doall the rewarding?The prime ministersaid,Fine. I'll do all the punishingandyoudoall the rewarding. I thinkI'm goingto like thisstory,the youngmansaid. You will,youwill,the One Minute Managerrepliedwithaknowingsmile. Nowthisemperor,the managercontinued,soonnoticedthatwheneverhe askedsomeone todo something,theymightdoitortheymightnot do it.However,whenthe prime ministerspoke,people moved.Sothe emperorcalledthe prime ministerbackinandsaid:Why don't we divide the tasksagain? You have beendoingall the punishinghere forquite awhile.Now letme dothe punishingandyoudo the rewarding.Sothe prime ministerandthe emperorswitchedrolesagain. And,withinamonththe prime ministerwasemperor.The emperorhadbeenanice person,rewarding and beingkindtoeveryone;thenhe startedtopunishpeople.People said:What'swrongwiththatold codger?and theythrewhimouton hisear. Whentheycame to lookfor a replacement,theysaid:You knowwho'sreallystartingtocome aroundnow the prime minister.So,theyputhimrightintooffice. Is that a true story? the youngman asked. Who cares?saidthe One Minute Manager,laughing.Seriously,he added,Idoknow this. If you are firsttoughon the behavior,andthensupportiveof the person,itworks. Do youhave any modern-dayexamplesof where the One Minute Reprimandhas workedotherthanin management?the youngmanaskedthe wise manager. Yes certainly,the managersaid.Letme mentiontwo:one withsevere adultbehaviorproblemsand anotherindisciplining children. What do youmeanwhenyousay 'severe adultbehaviorproblems'?the youngmanasked. I'm talkingaboutalcoholicsinparticular,the manageranswered.Aboutthirtyyearsagoanobservant clergymandiscoveredatechnique whichisnow called'crisisintervention."He made the discoverywhen he was helpingaphysician'swife.She wasinaMinnesotahospital incritical conditionandslowlydying
  36. 36. fromcirrhosisof the liver.Butshe wasstill denyingthatshe hada drinkingproblem.Whenall herfamily had gatheredather bedside,the clergymanaskedeachof themtodescribe specificdrinkingincidents theyhad observed.That'sanimportantpart of the One Minute Reprimand.Beforegivingareprimand youhave to see the behavioryourself youcan'tdependonwhatsomeone else saw.Younevergive a reprimandbasedon'hearsay" Interesting,the youngmanbroke in. Let me finish.Afterthe familydescribedspecificbehaviors,the clergymanaskedeachof the family memberstotell the womanhowtheyfelt aboutthose incidents.Gatheredcloselyaroundher,one by one theytoldherfirstwhat she did,andsecond,how theyfeltaboutit.Theywere angry,frustrated, embarrassed.Andthentheytoldherhow muchtheylovedher,andtheyinstinctivelytouchedherand gentlysaidhowtheywantedhertolive andto enjoylife once again.Thatwaswhytheywere so angry withher. That soundsso simple,saidthe youngman,especiallywithsomethingascomplicatedasadrinking problem.Diditwork? Amazinglyso,the One Minute Managerinsisted.Andnow there are crisisinterventioncentersall over the country.It's not as simple asI've summarizedit,of course.Butthese three basicingredients: 1.tellingpeople whattheydidwrong; 2.tellingpeople howyoufeelaboutit;and 3.remindingpeople thattheyare valuable andworthwhile leadtosignificantimprovementsinpeople's behavior. That's nothingshortof incredible,the youngmansaid. I knowit isthe manageragreed. You saidyou'dgive me two examplesof how otherpeople successfullyuse methodslike the One Minute Reprimand,the youngmansaid. Yes,of course.Inthe early1970's, a familypsychiatristinCaliforniaalsomade the same amazing discoverywithchildren.He hadreada lot aboutbondingthe emotional tiespeople have topeople.He knewwhatpeople needed.People needtobe incontact withpeople whocare aboutthemto be acceptedas valuable justbecause theyare people.The doctoralsoknew thatpeople needtohave a spade calledaspade to be pulledupshortbypeople whocare whentheyare notbehavingwell. How doesthattranslate,the youngman wantedtoknow,intopractical action?
  37. 37. Each parent istaughtto physicallytouchtheirchildbyputtingtheirhandonthe child'sshoulder, touchinghisarm, or if he is youngactuallysittingthe childintheirlap.Thenthe parenttellsthe child exactlywhathe didwrongand howthe parentfeelsaboutitandinno uncertainterms.(Youcan see that thisisverylike whatthe familymembersdidforthe sickwoman.) Finally,the parenttakesadeep breath,and allowsfora fewsecondsof silencesothe childcanfeel whateverthe parentisfeeling.Then the parenttellsthe youngsterhowvaluableandimportantthe childistothe parent. You see,itisveryimportantwhenyouare managingpeople torememberthatbehaviorandworthare not the same things.Whatis reallyworthwhile isthe personmanagingtheirownbehavior.Thisisas true of eachof us as managersas itis of each of the people we are managing. In fact,if you knowthis,the managersaid,as he pointedtoone of his favorite plaques,youwillknow the keyto a reallysuccessful reprimand: We Are NotJust Our Behavior We Are The PersonManagingOur Behavior If you realize thatyouare managingpeople,andnotjusttheirrecentbehavior,the managerconcluded, youwill dowell. It soundslike there'salotof caring and respectbehindsuchareprimand,the young mansaid. I'm gladyou noticedthat,youngman.You will be successful withthe One Minute Reprimandwhenyou reallycare about the welfare of the personyouare reprimanding. That remindsme the youngmaninjected,Mr.Levytoldme that youpat himon the shoulder,orshake hands,or insome otherway make contact withhimduringa praising.Andnow Inotice that the parents are encouragedtotouchtheirchildrenduringthe scolding.Istouchinganimportantpartof the One Minute PraisingsandReprimands? Yesandno,the manageransweredwithasmile.Yes,if youknow the personwelland are clearly interestedinhelpingthe persontosucceedinhisor herwork.Andno, if youor the otherpersonhas any doubtsaboutthat. Touch isa verypowerful message,the managerpointedout.Peoplehave strong feelingsaboutbeing touched,andthat needstobe respected.Wouldyou,forinstance,likesomeone whose motivesyou weren'tsure of,to touchyou duringa praisingora reprimand? No,the youngman answeredclearly.Ireallywouldn't!
  38. 38. You see whatI mean,the managerexplained.Touchisveryhonest.People know immediatelywhenyou touch themwhetheryoucare aboutthem, or whetheryouare justtryingto finda new wayto manipulate them. There isa verysimple rule abouttouching,the managercontinued.Whenyoutouch,don'ttake.Touch the people youmanage onlywhenyouare givingthemsomethingreassurance,support, encouragement,whatever. So youshouldrefrainfromtouchingsomeone,the youngmansaid,until youknow themandtheyknow youare interestedintheirsuccess,thatyouare clearlyontheirside.Ican see that. But, the youngman saidhesitantly,while the One Minute Praisingsandthe One Minute Reprimands looksimple enough,aren'ttheyreallyjustpowerfulwaysforyouto getpeople todowhat youwant themto do? Andisn'tthat manipulative? You are rightaboutOne Minute Managementbeingapowerful waytoget people todo whatyou wantthemto do, the managerconfirmed. Howevermanipulationisgettingpeople todosomethingtheyare eithernotaware of or don't agree to. That is whyitis so importanttoleteachpersonknow up frontwhat youare doingandwhy. It's like anythingelseinlife,the managerexplained.There are thingsthatwork,andthingsthat don't work.Beinghonestwithpeopleeventuallyworks.Onthe otherhand,as youhave probablylearnedin your ownlife,beingdishonesteventuallyleadstofailingwithpeople.It'sjustthatsimple. I can see now, the youngman said,where the powerof yourmanagementstyle comesfrom:youcare aboutpeople. Yes,the manager saidsimply,IguessIdo.The youngman rememberedhow gruff he thoughtthis special managerwaswhenhe firstmethim.It wasas thoughthe manager couldreadhismind. Sometimes,the One Minute Managersaid,youhave tocare enoughtobe tough.And I am.I am very toughon the poor performance butonlyonthe performance.Iam nevertoughonthe person.The youngman likedthe One Minute Manager.He knew now whypeople likedtoworkwithhim. Maybe youwouldfindthisinteresting,Sir,the youngermansaid,ashe pointedtohisnotebook.Itisa plaque I've createdtoremindme of how goalsthe One Minute Goalsand consequences:the Praisings and the Reprimandsaffectpeople'sbehavior. GoalsBeginBehaviors ConsequencesMaintainBehaviors That's verygood!the managerexclaimed. Do youthinkso? the youngman asked,wantingtohearthe complimentonce again.
  39. 39. Young man,the managersaid veryslowlyforemphasis,itisnotmy role inlife tobe a humantape recorder.I donot have time to continuallyrepeatmyself.Justwhenhe thoughthe wouldbe praised, the youngman felthe wasin foranotherOne Minute Reprimand,somethinghe wanted toavoid.The brightyoungman kepta straightface and saidsimply:What?Theylookedateach otheronlyfora momentandthentheybothburst intolaughter. I like you,youngman,the managersaid.How wouldyoulike togo to workhere?The youngmanput downhisnotebookandstaredinamazement.Youmeango to workfor you?he askedenthusiastically. No.I meango to work foryourself like the otherpeopleinmydepartment.Nobodyeverreallyworksfor anybodyelse.Ijusthelppeopleworkbetterandinthe processtheybenefitourorganization.Thiswas, of course,whatthe youngman had beenlookingforall along. I'd love towork here,he said.Andsohe didforsome time.The time the special managerhadinvested inhim paidoff.Because eventually,the inevitablehappened. HE became a One Minute Manager. He became a One Minute Manager notbecause he thoughtlike one,ortalkedlike one,butbecause he behavedlike one.He setOne Minute Goals.He gave One Minute Praisings.He gave One Minute Reprimands.He askedbrief,importantquestions;spoke the simple truth;laughed,worked,and enjoyed.And,perhapsmostimportantof all,he encouragedthe people he workedwithtodothe same. He had evencreatedapocketsize Game Planoto make iteasierforthe people aroundhimtobecome One Minute Managers.He had givenitas a useful gifttoeachpersonwhoreportedtohim. A GiftToYourself MANY yearslater,the man lookedbackonthe time whenhe firstheardof the principlesof One Minute Management.Itseemedlike alongtime ago.He was gladhe had writtendownwhathe learnedfrom the One Minute Manager. He hadput hisnotesintoa book,and had givencopiestomanypeople.He rememberedMs.Gomez's telephoningtosay,Ican't thankyou enough.It'smade a bigdifference inmy work. That pleasedhim. As he thoughtback onthe past,he smiled.He rememberedhow muchhe hadlearnedfromthe original One Minute Manager, andhe wasgrateful.The new managerwasalsohappythat he couldtake the knowledge one stepfurther.Bygivingcopiestomanyotherpeople inthe organization,he hadsolved several practical problems.Everyonewhoworkedwithhimfeltsecure.Noone feltmanipulatedor threatenedbecause everyone knewupfrontwhathe was doingandwhy.Theycouldalsosee whythe
  40. 40. seeminglysimple One Minute ManagementtechniquesGoals,PraisingandReprimandsworkedsowell withpeople.Everypersonwhohadtheirowncopyof the textcouldreadand re-readitat theirown pace until they couldunderstanditandputitto good use themselves.The managerknew full well the verypractical advantage of repetitioninlearninganythingnew.Sharingthe knowledge inthissimple and honestwayhad,of course,savedhima gooddeal of time.Andit had certainlymade hisjobeasier. Many of the people reportingtohimhad become One Minute Managersthemselves.Andthey,inturn, had done the same for manyof the people whoreportedtothem.The entire organizationhadbecome more effective.Ashe satat hisdeskthinking,the new One Minute Managerrealizedwhatafortunate individualhe was.He hadgivenhimself the giftof gettinggreaterresultsinlesstime.He hadtime to thinkandto plan to give hisorganizationthe kindof helpitneeded.He hadtime toexercise andstay healthy.He knewhe didnotexperience the dailyemotional andphysical stressothermanagers subjectedthemselvesto.Andhe knewthatmanyof the otherpeople whoworkedwithhimenjoyedthe same benefits.Hisdepartmenthad fewercostlypersonnel turnovers,lesspersonal illness,andless absenteeism.The benefitswere significant. As he lookedback,he wasglad he had notwaitedtouse One Minute Managementuntil he thoughthe coulddo itjust right.Afterhisstaff hadread aboutthismanagementsystem, he hadaskedeachperson whoreportedtohim if theywouldlike tobe managedbya One Minute Manager. He was amusedto learnthat there wassome thingthat people reallywantedevenmore thanlearninghow tobecome a One Minute Manager themselves.Andthatwastohave one for a boss!Once he knew this,itwasa lot easierforhimto clearlytell hisstaff thathe wasn'tsure that he coulddoit justexactlythe wayhe was supposedtoo. I'm not accustomedtotellingpeople how goodtheyare orhow I feel aboutthings,he hadsaid.AndI'm not sure I can remembertocalmdownafterI've givensomeoneareprimandandremindedthemof howgood theyare as a person.The typical answerfromhisassociateshadcausedhimtosmile. Well, youcouldat leastgive ita try! By simplyaskingif hisstaff wantedtobe managedbya One Minute Manager and byadmittingthathe maynot alwaysbe able to doit right,he had accomplishedsomething veryimportant.The people he workedwithfelt thathe washonestlyontheirside fromthe very beginning.Andthatmade all the difference.Thenthe new One Minute Managergotup fromhisdesk and beganto walkabouthisunclutteredoffice.He wasdeepinthought.He feltgoodabouthimself asa personandas a manager.Hiscaring aboutpeople hadpaidoff handsomely.He hadriseninthe organization,gainingmore responsibilitiesandmore rewards.Andhe knew he hadbecome aneffective manager,because bothhisorganizationandthe people inithadclearlybenefitedfromhispresence.
  41. 41. A GiftFor Others SUDDENLY the intercombuzzedandstartledthe man.Excuse me,sir,forinterruptingyou,he heardhis secretarysay,but there isa youngwomanon the phone.She wantsto know if she can come and talk to youabout the way we manage people here.The new One Minute Managerwaspleased.He knewmore womenwere enteringthe businessworld.Andhe wasgladthat some of themwere as keentolearn aboutgood managementashe had been.The manager'sdepartment wasnow runningsmoothly.As youmightexpect,itwasone of the bestoperationsof itskindinthe world.Hispeople were productive and happy.Andhe was happytoo.It feltgoodto be in hisposition. Come any time he heardhimself tellingthe caller. Andsoonhe foundhimselftalkingtoabrightyoungperson.I'mglad to share my managementsecrets withyou,the newOne Minute Manager said,as he showedthe visitortohiscouch.I will onlymake one requestof you. What isthat, the visitorasked. Simply,the managerbegan,thatyou... Share It With Others Acknowledgments Overthe yearswe have learnedfrom,andbeeninfluencedby,manyindividuals.We wouldlike toacknowledge andgive apublicpraisingtothe followingpeople: A Special Praisingto:Dr.GeraldNelson,the originatorof The One Minute Scolding,anamazingly effectivemethodof parental discipline.We have adaptedhismethodintoThe One Minute Reprimand, an equallyeffective methodof managerial discipline. and to: Dr.ElliottCarlisle forwhathe taughtus aboutproductive managerswhohave time to thinkandplan. Dr. Thomas Connellanforwhathe taughtusabout makingbehavioral conceptsand theoriesclearandunderstandable toall. Dr. Paul Hersey forwhathe taughtus aboutweavingthe variousappliedbehavioral sciencesintoauseful fabric. Dr. VernonJohnsonforwhathe taught usabout the CrisisInterventionMethodof treatmentforalcoholics. Dr.DorothyJongeward,JayShelov,andAbe Wagnerforwhattheytaughtus about communicationandthe OK-nessof people. Dr. RobertLorber forwhat he taught usabout the applicationanduse of behavioral
  42. 42. conceptsinbusinessandindustry. Dr. KennethMajerforwhat he taught usabout goal-settingandperformance. Dr. CharlesMcCormickfor whathe taughtus abouttouchingand professionalism. Dr. Carl Rogersfor whathe taught us aboutpersonal honestyandopenness. LouisTice forwhathe taught us aboutunlockinghumanpotential. Aboutthe Authors Dr. KennethBlanchard,Chairmanof BlanchardTrainingandDevelopment,Inc.(BTD), isan internationallyknownauthor,educatorandconsultanttrainer. He isthe co-authorof the highlyacclaimedandmostwidelyusedtextonleadership and organization behavior- Managementof OrganizationBehavior:UtilizingHuman Resources - whichisin itsfourtheditionandhasbeentranslatedintonumerous languages. Dr. BlanchardreceivedhisB.A.from Cornell UniversityinGovernmentandPhilosophy,anMA. from Colgate UniversityinSociologyandCounselinganda Ph.D.fromCornell inAdministrationand Management. He presentlyservesasaprofessorof LeadershipandOrganizationalBehavioratUniversityof Massachusetts,Amherst.Inaddition,he isamemberof the National TrainingLaboratories(NTL). Dr. Blanchardhas advisedsuchdistinguishedcorporationsandagenciesasChevron,Lockheed,ATT, HolidayInns,YoungPresidents'Organization(YPO),the UnitedStatesArmedForces,andUNESCO. Then,theyaskedme whatI thoughtwouldhappenwiththismethod.IlaughedbecauseIknew what wouldhappen.Afteraboutthree daysthe dogwouldpooponthe floorand jumpoutthe window.The dog didn'tknowwhatto do,but he knew he had betterclearthe area. The managerroared hisapproval. That's a great story,he said.You see,that'swhat punishmentdoeswhenyouuse itwithsomebodywho lacksconfidence orisinsecure because of lackof experience.If inexperiencedpeople don'tperform (thatis,do what youwant themtodo),thenrather thanpunishthemwe needtogo back to One Minute Goal Settingandmake sure theyunderstandwhatisexpectedof them, andthattheyhave seen whatgood performance lookslike. Well,then,afteryouhave done One Minute Goal Settingagain,the youngmanasked, do youtry to catch themdoingsomethingapproximatelyrightagain? Preciselyso,the One Minute Manageragreed.You're alwaystryingtocreate situationsinthe beginning where youcan give a One Minute Praising.Then, lookingthe youngmanstraightinthe eyes,the
  43. 43. managersaid,You are a veryenthusiasticandreceptive learner.Thatmakesme feel goodaboutsharing the secretsof One Minute Managementwithyou.Theybothsmiled.Theyknew aOne Minute Praising whentheyheardone.

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