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Economic Development and Early Childhood Education
 

Economic Development and Early Childhood Education

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For every dollar Invested in early childhood education, there is up to a $17 return on investment. Learn why early childhood education is vital, how the Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative and ...

For every dollar Invested in early childhood education, there is up to a $17 return on investment. Learn why early childhood education is vital, how the Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative and partner organizations like SECOM are making sure that all young children have the opportunity to succeed, and how businesses, churches, and individuals can help.

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    Economic Development and Early Childhood Education Economic Development and Early Childhood Education Presentation Transcript

    • Economic Importance of Early Childhood Education
    • 2 CURRENT REALITY THE CURRENT REALITY IN GRAND RAPIDS •Only 17% of students entering kindergarten, score “proficient” or better on their entrance tests •The four-year graduation rate in Grand Rapids Public Schools is 44.6% •Due to their family status, income level, parental education or other variables, approximately 4,600 children under the age of five are considered vulnerable.
    • 3 COMPLICATING FACTORS •Parent’s working multiple jobs and barely making ends meet •Single-parent households suffering the impacts of economic stress •Parent’s lack the time and or skills to interact and teach basic facts such as letters or numbers •English not the primary language at home •55% of parents do not have a high school diploma themselves
    • 4 EARLY EDUCATION MATTERS •First five years of life – 90% of a child’s brain development takes place •Positive and intellectually stimulating experiences early in life spur neuron connections that determine intelligence and behavior •Poverty, deprivation and stress can slow down brain development. •If children do not receive the necessary stimulation until age 5, much of their potential mental development opportunity has been lost, and it cannot ever be regained.
    • Economic Impact Nationally Costs when children aren’t prepared for Kindergarten: •$115 million in K-12 spending •$303 million in increased government spending and decreased tax revenues •$180 million in increased social costs
    • 6 THE ECONOMIC PAYOFF Children who can learn effectively do not get held back to repeat grades. Annual cost of children repeating kindergarten in GRPS -$1,189,910 annually Children who are ready to learn consume a proportionate, rather than disproportionate amount of teacher resources. Children prepared to learn when they enter school have a higher likelihood of contributing to economic development Economic Benefits: Every dollar spent=$17 return on investment (High Scope Educational Research Foundation). •584 million in reduced government spending and increased tax revenues •$221 million in K-12 savings •$347 million in reduced social costs to the public
    • 7 OUR SOLUTION •SECOM is one of seven neighborhood grass-roots organizations who came together in 2010 and formed the Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative (www.elncgr.org) to develop a solution to the problem of educational readiness in six targeted neighborhoods in Grand Rapids where children are most vulnerable •Shared Principles • Children need access to qualified learning experiences at an early age in order to fully develop their brain capacity • If they receive this early education, they will be ready to learn when they enter school. They cannot catch up if they start out behind • The best place for children to learn is in their own community, with qualified teachers who look like and understand them and their culture • Parents are critical partners in a child’s development and education process. They must be part of the solution. • A quality educational experience that meets these requirements can be best provided by organizations that are already “on the ground” in these communities
    • 8 “LITTLE STEPS” SECOM/ELNC PRESCHOOL •Giving 32 children an opportunity for life-long learning •3 hours per day, 4 days per week, 34 weeks per year • Curriculum focused on 38 skill areas including early literacy, math, social and motor skills •Ongoing assessments of child’s progress •Learning through play makes education fun
    • Additional Work in Early Childhood Education •Great Start serves as a hub to connect families to quality early childhood education options, including ELNC preschools. •Talent 2025 and other groups are working to support these efforts through advocacy, policymaking, and financial support.
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    • 12 INVEST IN QUALITY PRESCHOOL • Volunteer! • Adopt policies that support working parents • Educate employees on the value of Early Childhood Education • Convey to policy makers your support of public investment in Early Childhood Education programs • Invest financial resources in quality programs- Earn $17.00 for $1.00 spent!
    • 13 MORE INFORMATION • SECOM • www.secomministries.org • 616-452-7684 • Early Learning Neighborhood Collaborative • www.elncgr.org • 616-819-1407