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Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian
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Information literacy, e learning and the role of the librarian

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The updated presentation for a lecture I gave at the University of Sheffield, 28th February 2013

The updated presentation for a lecture I gave at the University of Sheffield, 28th February 2013

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  • 1. Information literacy, e-learning and the changing role of the librarian DR JANE SECKER LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE University of Sheffield, i School guest lecture 28th February 2013
  • 2. Overview About me Information literacy and librarians Librarians and e-learning Future trends to watch Ways to keep up to date
  • 3. My role Copyright and Digital Literacy Advisor at LSE Based in Centre for Learning Technology Work closely with colleagues in Library Advise staff about copyright and e-learning Run a programme of training for staff and PhD students: digital literacy Involved in information literacy initiatives for students: courses, online support
  • 4. How did I get here? My background: librarian and e-learning specialist, PhD in information science / history Worked in academic, government, museum libraries for the past 12 years Involved in many research projects: JISC, HEA Publications and conferences Regularly use Twitter (@jsecker) Maintain a few blogs!
  • 5. What else? Professional involvement: CILIP Information Literacy Group, Editor of Journal of Information Literacy, co-founder of LILAC Conference Member of UUK Copyright Working Group Former Chair of ALISS Completed LSE’s PGCert in Teaching in Higher Education – HEA Fellow Now teach on LSE’s PGCert Arcadia Fellow at Wolfson College Cambridge, 2011
  • 6. Information literacy and the librarian What does information literacy mean to you? Is an issue for all libraries or just academic libraries? How does it translate into what you might do as a librarian? What about librarians as teachers? Is information a new role for something librarians have always done?
  • 7. What do we mean byinformation literacy? “Digital fluency”
  • 8. “Information literacy empowers people in all walks of life to seek, evaluate, use and create information effectively to achieve their personal, social, occupational and educational goals. “It is a basic human right in a digital world and promotes social inclusion in all nations.” UNESCO (2005) Alexandria Proclamation
  • 9. A New Curriculum for Information Literacy Undertook research on developing a curriculum for information for undergraduates of the future – expert consultation / lit review Different to SCONUL 7 pillars and ACRL Standards – it’s a curriculum but also an approach to IL Designed to be flexible, adaptable, modular, embedded into programmes of study Not aimed just a librarians but at all educators Find out more from http://newcurriculum.wordpress.com
  • 10. ANCIL definition of Information LiteracyInformation literacy is a continuum of skills, behaviours, approaches and values that is so deeply entwined with the uses of information as to be a fundamental element of learning, scholarship and research.It is the defining characteristic of the discerning scholar, the informed and judicious citizen, and the autonomous learner.  ANCIL definition of information literacy (2011)
  • 11. ANCIL in practice The curriculum covers functional skills up to high-level intellectual operations Information literacy sessions can incorporate multiple strands but should be active, reflective, relevant to student needs Many resources on ANCIL blog At LSE we used the curriculum to audit provision for information literacy across the institution Undergraduate support at LSE: the ANCIL report Paper presented on LSE Teaching, Learning and Assessment committee was endorsed on 13th Feb 2013
  • 12. Information literacy at LSE A wide range of workshops provided by Academic Support Librarians – standalone and embedded Also use the VLE to provide online support in Library Companions Following ANCIL audit a new strategy is being developed to embed support and provide greater consistency across departments Work also to develop librarians as teachers: e.g. PGCert or short educational development sessions
  • 13. Digital Literacy in practice at LSE Digital literacy classes run by CLT and Library Open to all staff and PhD students Opt in programme but available each term Cover using new technologies to support teaching and research  social media (social networking, social bookmarking, Twitter, blogging), advanced internet searching, keeping up to date, developing your web presence Taught by CLT and Library staff but also will be reviewed in light of ANCIL audit Further information on CLT website
  • 14. Supporting PhD Students: the MY592 programme Information and digital literacy course comprising of six 2 hour workshops Aimed primarily at new PhD students Builds up skills over programme Specialist advice and support from liaison librarians Taught by CLT / Library staff Supported online in Moodle
  • 15. Course contents Week 1: Starting a literature search Week 2: Going beyond Google Week 3: Locating research publications Week 4: Specialist materials: primary sources Week 5: Managing information: Endnote, Zotero, Mendeley Week 6: Publication, ethical issues and keeping up to date Overview on LSE Library website
  • 16. Librarians as teachers Librarians can be highly innovative as teachers using social media and other technologies Some of the subjects we have to teach are challenging: plagiarism, referencing, copyright etc. Team teaching can be a great way to embed information literacy in a discipline – it’s also great for new teachers Getting a teaching qualification can really help Need to challenge traditional views about the role of librarians – it’s all about books right?
  • 17. E-learning and libraries E-learning support – librarians and learning technologists working in partnership to offer advice to staff and students Librarians can make use of e-learning for information literacy and other teaching opportunities E-learning offers some unique challenges in terms of copyright and licensing issues that librarians are often best placed to deal with
  • 18. Does it work in practice? In most institutions e-learning staff and librarians are rarely part of the same team Different cultures and different ways of working E-learning an emerging profession – no standard route into working in the field Professional body – ALT who have special interest groups, organise events and conferences and more recently accredit courses Academic support role means they can be ideal partners to help join up strategically and practically
  • 19. What are the issues Librarians may not have access to the VLE Librarians will need help and advice designing online courses E-learning staff may not understand copyright and licensing issues Students may not need to visit the Library if they have all their resources provided through a VLE Information literacy needs to be embedded in online courses as well as face to face
  • 20. Typical queries related to e-learning I want to include a video from YouTube in my online course – can I do this legally? I have lots of images taken from the website – is it ok to upload them to Moodle / Blackboard? Can I scan a chapter from a book and upload it to Moodle for my students? I downloaded a PDF from a journal – is it ok to share it with students using the VLE Who owns the materials I create when I use the university VLE?
  • 21. IPR and e-learning Increasingly universities are formalising their IPR policies and setting out the ownership of teaching materials In many cases there is no difference between paper teaching materials and those added to the VLE Some academics will work in partnership with e- learning colleagues to produce a resource, so institutional ownership is far easier Some institutions are encouraging staff to share teaching materials as open educational resources
  • 22. Open education Related to open access but different… Open educational resources are freely available teaching and learning resources often licensed under Creative Commons Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) are not just resources but courses MOOCs launched by several UK / US universities often through platforms such as Coursera, Udacity Also a great way of librarians sharing and reusing their information literacy teaching materials
  • 23. Future trends How might the needs of students evolve over the coming years and what impact will this have on teaching? What impact will fewer students visiting libraries and increased access to online readings be? How might VLEs evolve over the coming few years? What impact will MOOCs and open education have? What impact do other technologies such as social media have on the tools we use in education?
  • 24. Ways to keep up to date Conferences, events (LILAC, ARLG conference) JISC Regional Support Centres organise events for Further Education librarians LibCamp and TeachMeets Professional social networking: on LinkedIn, Twitter and by reading blogs Joining groups New Professionals Network, but also CILIP groups, other library groups Use a reader to follow blogs - consider writing your own to reflect on your work
  • 25. Further readings Secker, Jane and Coonan, Emma. (2012) Rethinking Information Literacy: a practical framework for supporting learning. Facet Publishing: London Bell, M., Moon, D. and Secker J. (2012) Undergraduate support at LSE: the ANCIL report. The London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK. Available at: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/48058/ Secker, Jane. (2010) Copyright and E-learning: a guide for practitioners. Facet Publishing: London New Curriculum Blog: http://newcurriculum.wordpress.com My blog: http://janesecker.wordpress.com LILAC Conference: http://www.lilacconference.com Follow me on Twitter @jsecker Join the CILIP CSG-Information Literacy Group – its free for students!
  • 26. Any questions?Dr Jane SeckerCopyright and Digital Literacy AdvisorCentre for Learning Technology, InformationManagement and Technology, LSEEmail j.secker@lse.ac.uk Find me on LinkedIn, Twitter etc.

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