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Digital literacies at LSE
 

Digital literacies at LSE

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A short talk about the range of support provided to postgraduate students at LSE by the Centre for Learning Technology and LSE Library

A short talk about the range of support provided to postgraduate students at LSE by the Centre for Learning Technology and LSE Library

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  • Write all the technologies that people mention onto the board – add any missing: Moodle PRS Lecture Capture Powerpoint Discussion forums Email Audio feedback Video Social networking Web 2.0 tools – blogs, twitter, etc. Wikis Online assessment Skype Video conferencing / Wimba classroom

Digital literacies at LSE Digital literacies at LSE Presentation Transcript

  • Supporting PhD students - digital and information literacy Dr Jane Secker LSE Centre for Learning Technology 5th May 2011
  • Overview
    • Definitions of information and digital literacy and useful models
    • Information skills classes at LSE
    • Digital literacy classes at LSE
    • MI512 programme
    • Other support and training
  • Introduction
    • What do we mean by digital and information literacies?
    • What relevance do digital and information literacy have to PhD students?
        • Researcher development framework
    • How can we best support research students?
  • Definition of information literacy
    • Information literacy empowers people in all walks of life to seek, evaluate, use and create information effectively to achieve their personal, social, occupational and educational goals. It is a basic human right in a digital world and promotes social inclusion in all nations.
    • UNESCO (2005) Alexandria Proclamation
    • “… Information literacy is knowing when and why you need information, where to find it, and how to evaluate, use and communicate it in an ethical manner.
    • CILIP (2004) Information literacy definition
  • Definition of digital literacy
    • “… the skills, knowledge and understanding that enables critical, creative, discerning and safe practices when engaging with digital technologies in all areas of life”
    • FutureLab, (2010)
  •  
  • New SCONUL model
  • FutureLab (2010) model of digital literacy
  • IL in practice
    • Information skills classes run by Library
      • Open to all students – focus on PGTs and UGs
      • Optional – run each term
      • Covers using library resources, literature searching, internet searching, citing and referencing, Endnote, keeping up to date
      • Taught by Library staff
      • Full programme listed on LSE Library website
  • DL in practice
    • Digital literacy classes run by CLT and Library
      • Open to all staff and PhD students
      • Optional – run each term
      • Cover using web 2.0 tools (social networking, social bookmarking, Twitter, blogging), internet searching, keeping up to date, managing your web presence
      • Taught by CLT and Library staff
      • Further information on CLT website
  • The MI512 programme
    • Information and digital literacy course comprising of six 2 hour workshops
    • Aimed primarily at new PhD students
    • Builds up skills over programme
    • Specialist advice and support from liaison librarians
    • Taught by CLT / Library staff
    • Supported online in Moodle
  • Course contents
    • Week 1: Starting a literature search
    • Week 2: Going beyond Google
    • Week 3: Locating research publications
    • Week 4: Specialist materials: primary sources
    • Week 5: Managing information
    • Week 6: Next steps and keeping up to date
    • Overview on LSE Library website
  • Course structure
    • Pre-course assessment
    • Activity based workshops all in computer classrooms
    • Support in Moodle but primarily F2F
    • Based around SCONUL 7 pillars and designed (and redesigned) to support student learning
    • Post course evaluation
    • Tailored feedback given to each student
  • Feedback
    • Course evaluation form has consistently good feedback - good or excellent
    • Students find it saves them time, improves their ability to find resources
    • Most are happy to attend a class for 6 weeks
    • Positive experience of meeting other PhD students from different departments
    • Raised profile of information literacy programmes and led to other training sessions for masters and undergrad students
  • Other support
    • Researchers Companion and PhD Net in Moodle
    • Research consultations offered with liaison librarians
    • Subject specific mini-MI512 programmes
    • DL and IL now embedded into PGCert that all PhD students who teach have to undertake
  • Challenges
    • Attendance varies across disciplines - more qualitative subjects attend rather than quantitative
    • Drop out rate around one third each term - in other programmes much worse
    • Staff time and skill to teach the programme
    • Appealing to students at different skills levels
    • Need to constantly update materials
    • How to provide ongoing support for previous cohorts
  • What next?
    • Drafted an information and digital literacy strategy for LSE
    • More closely align training programmes to the Researcher Development Framework
    • Continue to work collaboratively with other training providers across LSE to avoid duplication / better target training
    • Follow on course to MI512
  • Useful references
    • Jones, C, Ramanau, R, Cross, S and Healing, G (2010) ‘Net generation or Digital Natives: Is there a distinct new generation entering university?’, Computers & Education , 54, (3) , 722-732.
    • Margaryan, A and Littlejohn, A. (2009). Are digital natives a myth or reality? Students use of technologies for learning. Available at: http://www.academy. gcal .ac.uk/anoush/documents/DigitalNativesMythOrReality-MargaryanAndLittlejohn-draft-111208. pdf (Accessed 2nd June 2010)
    • Rowlands, I. et al ‘The Google generation: the information behaviour of the researcher of the future’, Aslib Proceedings New Information Perspectives , 60, (4) 290-310.
    • SCONUL (2011) The SCONUL 7 Pillars Core model. Available at: http://www.sconul.ac.uk/groups/information_literacy/seven_pillars.html
    • Secker, Jane and Macrae-Gibson, Rowena. (2011) Evaluating MI512: an information literacy course for PhD students. Library Review , 60 (2). pp. 96-107. ISSN 0024-2535. Available at: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/32975/
  • Contact details
    • Email j. [email_address] .ac. uk
    • Twitter @jsecker
    • Personal Blog http: //elearning . lse .ac. uk/blogs/socialsoftware/
    • DELILA Project Blog
    • http://delilaopen.wordpress.com
    • Arcadia Fellow for Easter Term based at Wolfson College / CARET so do get in touch!