Generations Of Programming Languages

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Basic explanations of the 5 generations of programming.

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  • When my teacher said 'learn the 5 generations of programming languages' im like, wtf, thats over 100 years. Then i researched online, found this...my friends will be screwed for their test
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  • hope more detailed information will be posted and more topics to be learn
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Generations Of Programming Languages

  1. 1. Generations of Programming Languages
  2. 2. Generations of Programming Languages Logic languages 5 Object oriented languages 4 Imperative languages 3 Assembly language 2 Machine language 1 Language / Type Generation
  3. 3. Machine Language <ul><li>Low level language </li></ul><ul><li>1s and 0s </li></ul><ul><li>Complex and long-winded for programming </li></ul><ul><li>High level of developer control </li></ul><ul><li>Ultimately everything is translated into machine language. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Assembly Language <ul><li>Low level language. </li></ul><ul><li>Shortened instructions. </li></ul><ul><li>Needs thousands of instructions to perform one useful task. </li></ul><ul><li>Assembler program is needed to translate. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Imperative languages <ul><li>High level language </li></ul><ul><li>Must have some form of translation. </li></ul><ul><li>Usually written for a specific area of use: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>COBOL – business language </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BASIC – beginning programmer’s instruction code </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FORTRAN – scientists and engineers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Structured and sequential – logical sequence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>3 control structures </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Object Oriented & Event Driven Languages <ul><li>High level language. </li></ul><ul><li>Object oriented languages organise coding around objects. </li></ul><ul><li>Specific characteristics: inheritance, polymorphism, classes etc… </li></ul><ul><li>Event driven – the event triggers the outcome (eg: a click event). </li></ul><ul><li>Non-procedural </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: VB.NET, C++ </li></ul>
  7. 7. Logic Languages <ul><li>High level language. </li></ul><ul><li>Associated with Artificial Intelligence. </li></ul><ul><li>Uses knowledge bases and expert systems. </li></ul><ul><li>Less programmer control. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Prolog </li></ul>
  8. 8. Choice of language: <ul><li>Availability of programming translator program. </li></ul><ul><li>Cost of language translator and cost in time to create program. </li></ul><ul><li>Strengths and weaknesses of the programmer. </li></ul><ul><li>Suitability of approach. </li></ul><ul><li>Ease of programming in that language. </li></ul><ul><li>Future viability of the language. </li></ul>

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