Strategic Design Thinking

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  • 1. STRATEGIC DESIGN THINKING by Christophe Pradère 24.09.2009 AN INTRODUCTION TO
  • 2. Module 01 • Design: The Origin of the Story 1.1 • First Period: The Logic of the Industrial Age 1.2 • Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age 1.3 • Third Period: The Logic of the Digital Age 1.4 • So What Is Design? A Definition Module 02 • Design and Strategy: Visualizing a Concept 2.1 • The Disciplines of Design 2.2 • Design: An Economic Weapon 2.3 • The Art of War Module 03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept 3.1 • The Brand: A State of Mind 3.2 • The Design Approach 3.3 • Business Toolkit 3.3.1 • Creative Business Idea (CBI) 3.3.2 • Business Approach 3.4 • Strategical Toolkit 3.4.1 • Semiology 3.4.2 • Anthropology 3.4.3 • Culture 3.5 • Case Study: Air France 3.6 • Case Study: Sulwhasoo Summary
  • 3.
    • Module 01
    • Design: The Origin of the Story
  • 4.
    • 1.1
    • First Period: The Logic of the Industrial Age
  • 5. “ Design is first and foremost common sense.” Ferdinand Porsche
  • 6. People look at things and ask why? I dream about new things and ask why not? George Bernard Shaw
  • 7.
    • • 1851: The Great Exhibition (World Fair) - Crystal Palace in London
    • Design was born from the confrontation between “ Art ” (decoration) and “ Industry ” (manufacturing)
    • Our notion of design today was brought forth by the Industrial Revolution
    • • It was the beginning of mass production and the first consumer brands
    1.1 First Period: The Logic of the Industrial Age The Industrial Revolution
  • 8.
    • • The Industrial Revolution took place in the late 18th and early 19th centuries
    • It was a period where major changes in agriculture , manufacturing , mining , and transport had a profound effect on the socioeconomic and cultural conditions in the U.K.
    • Changes spread throughout Europe, North America, and eventually the rest of the world, marking a major turning point in human society
    • Almost every aspect of daily life was influenced in some way
    1.1 First Period: The Logic of the Industrial Age The Industrial Revolution
  • 9.
    • Some of the most notable inventions were:
    The Steam Engine (1775) The Automobile (1885) The Airplane (1903 ) MOBILITY The Telegraph (1863) The Telephone (1876 ) COMMUNICATION The Cotton Gin (1775) The Sewing Machine (1844) The Assembly Line (1913 ) MASS PRODUCTION 1.1 First Period: The Logic of the Industrial Age The Industrial Revolution
  • 10. The Industrial Revolution / The Concept of Mass Production
    • The sewing machine is a textile machine used to stitch fabric or other material together with thread.
    • Since its creation, the sewing machine has vastly improved the efficiency and productivity of the fabric and clothing industries, enabling the production of clothes en masse and later giving birth to the idea of fashion.
    Arts & Crafts Usability
    • Functional + Ornamental
    • Manual
    • Strength
    • Technique
    • Modern
    • Electric / Automatic
    • Ease
    • Guide
    1910 -1930 1990 - 2000 2009 1.1 First Period: The Logic of the Industrial Age Performance Decorative Machine Hyper Machine Super Machine
  • 11. Critical Thinking
    • 1) What does this object represent for you?
    • A machine?
    • A piece of art?
    • What is the perceived function? Explain why?
    • What is the design language behind the object? Describe.
    • 4) What is the symbolic dimension behind its shape?
    1.1 First Period: The Logic of the Industrial Age Art + Technology / BelOga Concept Sewing Machine by Kristine Brückner, Münich
  • 12.
    • As a device for communication, the telephone has become one of the most common household appliances in the world as well as an indispensable part of our lives.
    • Today, mobile phones seem to be the logical result of our evolving system of communication.
    The Industrial Revolution / The Concept of Communication
    • I Dial + I Speak + I See + I Move + I Play
    • - Functions: Split - Condesned - Fully Integrated
    • Multiple Components - Monoblock
    • Analog - Dual - Digital
    • Rotary Dial - Keypad - LCD Panel
    • Collective - Individual
    • Static - Dual - Mobile
    1.1 First Period: The Logic of the Industrial Age
  • 13. Critical Thinking 1.1 First Period: The Logic of the Industrial Age Future Concept Nokia Morph
    • 1) What does this object represent for you?
    • A machine?
    • A piece of art?
    • What is the perceived function? Explain why?
    • What is the design language behind the object? Describe.
    • 4) What is the symbolic dimension behind its shape?
  • 14.
    • The car, or automobile, is a quintessential symbol of modern transport and travel.
    • They symbolize society’s technological progress over the past century and have become extensions of ourselves, forever changing the way we live, work, and travel.
    The Industrial Revolution / The Concept of Mobility 1.1 First Period: The Logic of the Industrial Age From Horse Power to Mechanical Power Usability / Space to Live Performance Machine Ergonomic Machine / Monocoque Super Machine
    • Wood / Steel
    • Rudimentary, Practicality
    • Ornamental
    • Manual
    • The form expresses the origin
    • Streamlined / “Bolidisme”
    • The form expresses the performance of the function
    • Composite
    • Simplified: From an object to a space
    • Comfort / Secutiry
    • Hybrid / Electric/Automatic
    • The form expresses a pholosophy of mobility
  • 15. 01 • Design: The Origin of the Story Critical Thinking Peugeout BB1
    • 1) What does this object represent for you?
    • A machine?
    • A piece of art?
    • What is the perceived function? Explain why?
    • What is the design language behind the object? Describe.
    • 4) What is the symbolic dimension behind its shape?
  • 16. 01 • Design: The Origin of the Story Critical Thinking / The Concept of Mobility
  • 17.
    • 1.2
    • Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
  • 18. Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age A • Distribution B • Packaging 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
  • 19. Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age A • Distribution • A System of Images (Identity) • A System of Sales (Function) 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age • A retail concept is based on:
  • 20. Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
    • A • Distribution
    • • 1st Evolution (1950s – 1960s) - Mass Distribution  Hypermarkets
    •  Category Killers
    •  Flagships
    • • 2nd Evolution (1960s – 1990s) - Retail Network  Retail
        •  Thematic Distribution
    •  Brand Shops
    • • 3rd Evolution (1990s – …. ) - Motion Distribution  Showrooms
    •  Ephemeral Stores  Concept Stores
    • - Distribution of Entertainment  Entertainment-Themed Restaurants
    •  Boutique Hotels
    1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
  • 21.
    • Mass Distribution
  • 22. Mass Distribution Is the large scale distribution of consumer goods and serivces to the market with the objectives of:  Being cheap in terms of cost / price  Being universal in terms of selling everything to everyone (targeting the most number of customers) 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age COSCO, U.S.
  • 23.
    • Became commonplace in the early 20th century when the demand for food and other perishable goods grew sharply.
    • It is an effective strategy if production capacities are tested.
    • With mass distribution, companies shouldn’t take more orders for products if they cannot deliver.
    • Through mass distribution, wholesalers and retailers were able to rapidly and effectively sell their goods .
    • Mass Distribution ≠ Specialized Distribution
    • On the opposite end, specialized distribution focuses on limiting the target audience. As an exclusive distribution strategy, it is developed to create and enhance a certain image for products.
    • By limiting distribution, the concept of exclusivity can be created. This cannot be acheived through mass distribution.
    1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age Mass Distribution
  • 24. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age A superstore which combines a supermarket and a department store.  Hypermarkets
  • 25.
    • The result: a very large retail facility which carries an enormous range of products under one roof , including full lines of groceries and general merchandise.
    • Hypermakets are like ‘Big Box Stores’ (Category Killers); they pursue business models that focus on high-volume , low-margin sales .
    • These stores leave large footprints with retail spaces usually starting at 5,000 m2.
    • E.g. A typical Carrefour store can cover a surface are of 20,000 m2.
    • Through mass distribution, wholesalers and retailers were able to rapidly and effectively sell their goods .
    • Due to their large size, they are usually built in out-of-town locations which are accessible by automobile.
    1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age  Hypermarkets
  • 26. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
    • Before : One brand, One Format
    • Large size plays a key dominating factor along with a large store capacity to carry more brands.
    • - Average sizes:  Carrefour – 18,000 m2  Auchan – 13,200 m2  Wallmart – 24,000 m2
     Hypermarkets
  • 27. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
    • After : One brand, Multiformat
    • We now see a reduction in size and increased segmentation .
    • Superstores such as Tesco and Carrefour are slowly penetrating into urban areas with their own smaller versions.
    • E.g. Sainsbury’s Local , TESCO Express , Carrefour Market , Carrefour Contact, Carrefour City
     Hypermarkets
  • 28.  Supermarkets, Convenience Stores 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age A supermarket is a self-service store offering a wide variety of food and household merchandise, organized into departments. Also known as grocery stores in the U.S. Convenience stores are small stores or shop that sells items such as candy, ice-cream, soft drinks, lottery tickets, newspapers and magazines, along with a selection of processed food and perhaps some groceries.
  • 29. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age Large companies that put less efficient and highly specialized merchants out of business.  Category Killers BEST BUY, U.S. THE HOME DEPOT, U.S.
  • 30. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
    • - They offer an extensive and comprehensive range of products of a particular type at discounted prices.
    • Strategically attain their status by being cheaper , easier , bigger , or more popular than the competition , eventually eliminating the competition .
    • They dominate their product category . e.g. IKEA with stylish, affordable furniture and home accessories.
    • Also Known As: Big Box Stores
     Category Killers
  • 31. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age  Category Killers
  • 32. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age - Organization - Signage - Animation - Catergory Management DESIGN STAKES  Category Killers
  • 33. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age Flagship stores, or flagships, are main stores from retailers (usually a ‘mono brand’) designed to serve a mainstream of customers.  Flagships Louis Vuitton Flagship Champs-Élysées, Paris Louis Vuitton Flagship Ginza, Tokyo
  • 34. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
    • They are found in prominent shopping districts (e.g., Ginza, Madison Avenue, Champs-Élysées etc.)
    • that are targets for a main set of worldwide high-income shoppers.
    • Flagships are larger in retail size then normal stores or boutiques and hold the most volumes in merchandise.
    • They serve as the brand’s emblem – helping represent and increase the value of the brand.
    • Shopping at an upscale flagship is oftentimes seen as high social / economic status .
    • In French: ‘ Magasins Phares’
     Flagships
  • 35. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age  Flagships Paris Japan Hong Kong
  • 36. A Place of Trade and Communication  A place which gives more impact to the purchase made  A place that allows the brand to communicate with a multitude of publics An Ideal Retail Store, which serves as a theater for the brand to display its true essence  A place that further promotes publicity A Place of Renewable Experiences  A place which gives people the desire to come again and again  Capable of attracting all publics - first-timers and repeat customers  A premium address , a premium destination in the city 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age The flagship store, a retail store like nothing else…  Flagships
  • 37. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
    • A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY TO CREATE A NEW OPINION ON THE BRAND
    • TO MAKE A FLAGSHIP STORE EXEMPLARY OF THE BRAND IMAGE AND BUSINESS
    • TO ADDRESS A BRAND STRATEGY SHIFT
    The Brief: Renovation of the Champs-Élysées Retail Store Critical Thinking / Petit Bateau Case Study
  • 38. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
    • Embody the new brand positioning via two essential elements of the brand platform:
    •  Being Multigenerational
    •  Being Fashionable
    • Recruit new publics, new targets
    • Emerge among the noise and customer traffic of the Champs-Élysées
    • Counter offensive on competitors of the core business
    The Brief: Renovation of the Champs-Élysées Retail Store Critical Thinking / Petit Bateau Case Study
  • 39. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
    • Develop the brand’s level of profitability
    • Increase the brand’s attractiveness towards a mostly international audience
    • Improve the commercial functions
    •  Product presentations / Merchandise displays
    •  Turn offers into events
    •  Encourage impulse purchases
    The Brief: Renovation of the Champs-Élysées Retail Store Critical Thinking / Petit Bateau Case Study
  • 40. Petit Bateau exemple : Simple, Playful, Soft, Smart, Timeless, Qualitative 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age The Brief: Brand Image Critical Thinking / Petit Bateau Case Study
  • 41. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age Petit Bateau exemple : Basic Essentials, Multigender, Modernity, Qualitative Simplicity The Brief: Recent Ad Campaign Critical Thinking / Petit Bateau Case Study
  • 42. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age
    • QUESTIONS
    • Define the core target of the brand.
      • Already existing one
      • New one to be acquired
    • 2) Define the core image, values (core values, peripherical values), vision of the Brand
    • and style of the offer.
    • CONCLUSION (WHAT YOU LEARN FROM THE ANALYSIS AND WHAT IS YOUR RECOMMANDATION OF EVOLUTION)
    • 3) Define a new concept of space for the brand in terms of:
    • - Key words (Text)
    • - Image (Concept Boards and Mood Boards)
    • - Drawings
    • - Offer organization and Client Track
    Critical Thinking / Petit Bateau Case Study
  • 43. 1.2 Second Period: The Logic of the Commercial Age The Brief: A flagship exemplary of the brand’s business Critical Thinking / Petit Bateau Case Study
  • 44. Module 03 Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept
  • 45. Design is a practice between marketing and culture  To be both universal and intimate
    • It is at the crossroads of a dual approach:
      • Marketing: A quest for universality, linking the rational and the systematic
      • Culture: A quest for intimacy, linking the emotional and the individual
    03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept 3.2 The Design Approach
  • 46.
    • Having a cultural approach is the fundamental basis of imagination for a brand as
    • well as its origin (the Myth)
    • Design serves as the essence of a brand; it has the ability to manipulate its DNA
    • The issue is that design must resonate with the other media of the brand
    • Therefore, it must act synergistically with the brand’s language
    Design is a practice between marketing and culture  To be both universal and intimate 03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept The Design Approach
  • 47. 03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept The Design Approach Designing a range of media Creating a virtuous synergy Design is a medium: • of form and depth • of persistence
  • 48. 03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept 3.2.1 Creative Business Idea (CBI) Business Toolkit A Marketing Approach Prosumer Brand Category Creative Business Idea
  • 49.
    • Brand Vision / Brand Philosophy:
    • What a brand wants to bring and contribute to human society
    • The manner of imagining its business in the market
    • The expression of what the company wants to achieve in the long-term
    • The personal and specific way the company wants to address its business stakes
    • A vision is an ambitious and idealistic way to express the foundation of the company’s strategy.
    • Brand Mission / Brand Vocation:
    • What a brand wants to achieve for each customer
    • The role the company wants to play in the market
    • The way the company is going to achieve its vision
    • The description of the global assignment that the company gives to its team
    03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept Business Toolkit 3.2.2 Business Approach
  • 50. 03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept 3.2.2 Business Approach Business Toolkit
  • 51.
    • Brand Positioning:
    • How the brand targets its core audience
    • It involves the application of the 4 P’s of the Marketing Mix
    • Product
    • Price
    • Place (Distribution)
    • Promotion
    • Audience:
    • Target / customers, influencers, analyses, use what you learn in the ‘Prosumer Presentation of Marianne Urstel’
    03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept 3.2.2 Business Approach Business Toolkit
  • 52. 03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept Strategical Toolkit 3.3.2 Anthropology
  • 53. 03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept Strategical Toolkit
    • Culture:
    • This is the whole realization; the know-how related to the brand
    • The agglomeration of all the artistic, domestic, scientific, and political achievements of a society
    3.3.3 Culture
  • 54.
    • CORE VALUES
    • PERIPHERAL VALUES
    • VALUES OF PROGRESS / EVOLUTION
    VALUES / KEY WORDS: 03 • Methodology and Case: Translating a Concept Strategical Toolkit 3.3.3 Culture
  • 55. Thank you :-)