Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Smoking Feature
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Smoking Feature

12,162
views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine

1 Comment
8 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Smoking Cannabis While Pregnant is bad go this website if you want to know more about it http://www.smokingweedwhilepregnant.blogspot.com
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
12,162
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
921
Comments
1
Likes
8
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Prof. (Dr.) SEBASTIAN K.L. KIZHAKAYIL
  • 2. SMOKING: A DEADLY STATITICS
    • 1.3 billion people worldwide smoke.
    • 6000 billion cigarette sticks are smoked worldwide every year.
    • 4.9 million death every year worldwide due to tobacco smoking (WHO) will reach to 10 million by 2020, 70% of which will occur in developing countries.
    • INDIA – 6,35,000 people die from tobacco related diseases every year (WHO)
    4 lakh cases of cancer, 13 lakh cases of heart ailments, 80 to 90% of lung cancer cases due to smoking. Pattern of Consumption l 54% Beedis 27% Pan Masala, Snuff, Chewing tobacco, 19% Cigarette 55,000 children start smoking in an year. Indian’s smoke 90 billion cigarettes an year. At an average Rs. 2 a cigarette Rs. 180 billion goes up in smoke. According to Indian Council of Medical Research the cost of treating tobacco related diseases and cancers was Rs. 2776 crores. Whereas the value of tobacco products sold nation wide is about 24,400 crores. If this trend goes unchecked 13% of all deaths in India would be solely due to tobacco .
  • 3. SMOKING INCREASES YOUR CHANCES OF DEVELOPING MANY DISEASES (AVERAGE SMOKER OVER NON SMOKER DISEASE INCREASED CHANCES CHRONIC BRONOHITIS 2000% CANCER OF LUNG 1000% CANCER OF THE MOUTH 850% CANCER OF THE LARYNX 475% CANCER OF THE AESAPHAGUS 300% CANCER OF THE LIVER AND GALL BLADDER 180% CANCER OF THE PANCREAS 170% PEPTIC ULCER 116% LIVER CIRRHOSIS 93% A cigarette has fire at one end and a fool at the other end.
  • 4.  
  • 5. SELECTED CIGARETTE SMOKE CONSTITUENTS SUBSTANCE EFFECTS TAR CARCINOGEN POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS CARCINOGEN NICOTINE STIMULANT, DEPRESSANT ADDICTING DRUG PHENOL CARCINOGEN AND IRRITANT CRESOL CARCINOGEN AND IRRITANT B-NAPTHYLAMINE CARCINOGEN AND IRRITANT BENZO PYRENE CARCINOGEN NICKEL, ARSENIC, POLONIUM 210 (Radioactive) CARCINOGEN INDOLE TUMOR ACCELERATOR CARBAZOLE TUMOR ACCELERATOR CATECHOL CARCINOGEN
  • 6. GASES CARBON MONOXIDE POISONOUS HYDROCYANIC ACID CILIOTOXIN AND IRRITANT ACETALDEHYDE CILIOTOXIN AND IRRITANT ACROLEIN CILIOTOXIN AND IRRITANT AMMONIA CILIOTOXIN AND IRRITANT FORMALDEHYDE CILIOTOXIN AND IRRITANT OXIDES OF NITROGEN CILIOTOXIN AND IRRITANT NITROSOAMINES CILIOTOXIN AND IRRITANT HYDROZINE CILIOTOXIN AND IRRITANT VINYL CHLORIDE CILIOTOXIN AND IRRITANT
  • 7. This patient had a habit of placing tobacco beneath his lips, greatly incre- asing his chances of developing cancer of the lips, tongue and mouth. Cancer of the oral cavity destroyed his tongue. Ultimately he required an oper-ation to remove his tongue.
  • 8. Tobacco, panmasala usage initially causes a loss in taste sensation of the tongue. With time, ulcers form on the tongue and lips… eating becomes difficult… white patches of leucoplakia form… the early stages of cancer.
  • 9. SMOKE – A DEADLY MIXTURE BURNING CIGARETTES AT TEMP. 900 0 C PRODUCES, A DEADLY MIXTURE OF 3500 CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES. A PERSON WHO SMOKES 20 CIGARETTES MAKES 78,000 PUFFS AN YEAR. EACH PUFF HAS 15 BILLION PARTICLES!! THESE ARE THE CHEMICALS: NICOTINE, TAR, PYRIDINE, METHYL ALCOHOL, AMMONIA, CARBON MONOXIDE, FORMALDEHYDE, BENZOPYRENE, PHENOLS, ARSENIC, FORMIC ACID, HYDROGEN CYANIDE etc. AND EVEN INCLUDING INSECTICIDES AND RADIOACTIVE POLONIUM 210. THESE CHEMICALS ABSORBED INTO THE BLOOD, REACHES EVERY ORGAN SYSTEM IN THE BODY AND ARE CANCER CAUSING, MUTAGENIC AND TUMOR CAUSING.
  • 10. PRODUCTIVE HAZARDS OF SMOKING Reproductive health problems
    • Woman
    • Egg production (oogenesis) decreases
    • Implantation failure increase
    • Early pregnancy losses (miscarriage) increase
    • Small-for-date babies increase
    • Premature/pre-term labour increase
    • Man
    • Sexual potency decreases
    • Fertility is impaired
    • Sperm count decreases
    • Sperm movements decreases
    • Abnormal forms of sperm increases
  • 11. HEART
  • 12. STROKE
  • 13.
    • Immediate Problems
    • Risk associated with pre-term/premature delivery.
    • Still births increase.
    • Small-for-date babies
    • Sudden infant death syndrome
    • Nicotine has been found in the urine of newborn babies (born to mothers who are smokers-active and passive)
    • Delayed Problems
    • Gene mutations (Alterations)
    • Diabetes mellitus
    • Increased risk of cardiovascular disease (high blood pressure, heart attack)
    • Risk of cancer
    HEALTH RISK FOR WOMEN
  • 14. PHYSICAL WITHDRAWL SYMPTOMS When you decide to stop giving your body nicotine and break the cycle, it may respond through “withdrawal symptoms”. These physical symptoms may include:  Restlessness  Constipation  Irritability  Dry mouth or sore throat  Difficulty concentrating  Fatigue  Sleep disturbances  Coughing  Increased appetite  Nicotine “craving”  Headache
  • 15. COST Smoking is expensive. It isn’t hard to figure out how much you spend on smoking: multiply how much money you spend on tobacco every day by 365 (days per year). The amount may surprise you. Now multiply that by the number of years you have been using tobacco and that amount will probably astound you. Multiply the cost per year by 10 (for the upcoming 10 years) and ask yourself what you would rather do with that much money. And this doesn’t include the higher costs for health and life insurance, as well as the possible health care costs due to tobacco-related conditions.
  • 16. KILLER WEED The Portuguese introduced tobacco in India 400 years ago. Tobacco consumption has been rising from that time. The tobacco fact sheet is scary. Tobacco is the second major cause of death in the world. It is currently responsible for the death of one in 10 adults worldwide (about five million deaths each year). If current smoking pattern continue, it will cause some 10 million deaths each year by 2020. Half the people that smoke today – that is about 650 million people – will eventually be killed by tobacco. According to the Indian Council for Medical Research (ICMR) the cost of treating tobacco related disorders like COPD, CAD and cancers was Rs. 2,776 crores whereas the value of tobacco products sold nation wide was about Rs. 24,400 crores. If this trend goes unchecked 13 per cent of all deaths in India would be solely due to tobacco. Eight lakh people die every year, 2,200 deaths per day and 90 per hour. The Government of India has passed an anti-tobacco legislation. “The Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products Act 2003”, which came into force on May 1, 2004. This replaces the Cigarette Act 1975. If this act is enforced fully, there can be a tobacco-free India.
  • 17. Some of the problems that smoking can cause are: Hair loss; Cataracts; Hearing loss; Wrinkling; Skin cancer; Tooth decay; Emphysema; Osteoporosis; Heart disease; Stomach ulcers; Discolored fingers; Uterine cancer and miscarriage; Infertility; Psoriasis; Buerger’s disease; Cancer (Smokers are 22 times more likely to develop lung cancer)
  • 18.
    • Salient features of “The Cigarettes and Other
    • Tobacco Products Act 2003”
    • Enforce smoking ban in public places more aggressively.
    • Prohibition of selling tobacco to children below 18 years.
    • Stop the attractive and deceptive advertisements which tantalises the gullible to resort to smoking not knowing that he is putting his systems to risk.
    • Make the smoke-free kits more affordable.
    • To end all forms of sponsorship and advertisement.
    • Measures to reduce ETS exposure in work places and public places.
    • Strong health warnings with graphics about the dangers of smoking on the tobacco containers in their local language.
    • An end of duty free tobacco products and duty imports.
  • 19. Smoking also causes more damage to the ears. Smokers are more likely to have hearing impairment, especially at high-frequency noise levels. This is probably because of decreased blood flow to the inner ear. The fact that smokers are less healthy than non-smokers could also contributed to hearing loss. Hearing loss also occurs with exposure to passive smoke. Smoking increases that risk of some urinary tract conditions, and is also associated with atherosclerosis, including the blood vessels that go to the kidney. This causes high blood pressure and loss of kidney function. Smoking tends to cause chronic coughing, which can add to the problem of bladder control, and also increase the risk of bladder cancer. Smoking causes sleep disturbances linked to insomnia, excessive sleepiness, and sleep-ordered breathing. Severe daytime sleepiness is 60 per cent more likely in smokers that non-smokers. Smoking causes throat muscles to swell and increases the formation of mucus, resulting in snoring.
  • 20. The Effects on Women Women who smoke are at an increased risk for developing various cancers, including cervical cancer, lung cancer, skin cancer, and cancers of the mouth, larynx, pharynx, oesophagus, pancreas, kidney and bladder. Studies have found that women smokers reach menopause at a younger age and are more likely to experience menopausal symptoms. They are also at an increased risk for osteporosis and hip fractures, compared to those who don’t smoke. Smoking may also impair fertility. Pregnant woman who smoke are prone to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery and the babies are of low birth weight. Studies have also shown a strong association between smoking during pregnancy and the risk of invasive meningitis during early childhood. The risk of bacterial meningitis is five times higher among children whose mothers smoke during pregnancy.
  • 21. In addition to other health problems, childhood meningitis can cause inflammation of the cornea and pink eye. And finally, oxygen therapy given to sustain the lives of premature infants can cause retinopathy of prematurity, causing permanent vision loss or blindness. Passing it on Those who breastfeed their babies may pass on harmful chemicals through breast milk. Babies born to parents who smoke are more susceptible to diseases such as asthma and suffer an increased risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).
  • 22. Tarred by tobacco use Most people have heard that smoking causes much damage to the body. But what does it actually do. Smoking attacks the blood vessels and blood cells making them sticky. This allows the build up of dangerous fatty substances like cholesterol. The attack begins as soon as a person starts smoking and continues with each cigarette. Early Damages A 10-year study by the U.S. based National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutions of Health) found that the damage begins very early in life. More than 1400 people from 15 to 34 years were studied and autopsies were performed within 48 hours of death. Blood vessels were examined for atherosclerosis, which is a forerunner of heart disease, strokes and other forms of diseases. Blood was examined to check the level of cholesterol and thiocyanate (a marker of smoking) It was found that the smokers had early signs of atherosclerosis in the aorta, the main blood vessel.
  • 23. This raises the question of whether the condition of the arteries will improve if people quit smoking. The answer is yes. In most cases, the blood vessels will not get any worse and the damage can dissipate. When tobacco burns, it generates particulate matter, called tar, which is a part of cigarette smoke. Each particle of tar is made up of nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and a wide range of volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals. When condensed, it is a sticky brown substance – the main cause of cancers in smokers. It can also causes stains on the fingers and teeth. An average smoker inhales about 150 mls in a year. All this does not remain permanently in the lungs. Some of it is exhaled when the smoke is breathed out. Some of it is coughed up. But the tar absorbed by the lungs leads the cells to die.
  • 24. Lung trouble Cigarette smoke paralyses or destroys the cilia – the fine hairs that line the upper airways and help protect against infection. Damaged cilia help the tar penetrate further into the lungs, where it causes more damages. The immediate problems this causes are coughing and shortness of breath or tightness in the chest. Lung damage caused by smoking can lead to also lead to other health problems like emphysema. Cigarette smoke contains over 4000 compounds, many pharmacologically active, toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic. There are also 43 known carcinogens in tobacco smoke. If one gives up smoking, cilia that are only paralysed (and not destroyed) can recover. Chest and lung conditions (asthma and chest infections) caused by smoking. Remember, it is never too late to quit smoking. And it is never too early for tobacco to cause damage.
  • 25. Within seven seconds after you inhale your cigarette nicotine has entered your brain. Carbon monoxide enters the brain and limits the oxygen supply. Smoke acts as an irritant to your nose and mouth. With in three seconds after you inhale your cigarette, nicotine has entered your bloodstream. Now the smoke enters your lungs where 90 percent of the dangerous substances are absorbed. Your lungs begin to look black and deformed from the substances you inhale. Try exhaling the smoke from your cigarette into a white handkerchief. What you see on there is what your lungs look like. These air sacs are as fragile as balloons. When this heavy sticky targets on them it makes it difficult for them to take in and let out air. This makes it difficult for you to breathe. Within your lungs are tiny air sacs. Tar from the smoke sticks to the sacs. This causes the sacs to become deformed in shape, lose their elasticity, and prevent air from easily entering your lungs.
  • 26. Over 3,500 dangerous substances are flowing through your body. They are being carried in your blood to all organ systems in your body. They touch the mouth, nose, esophagus, stomach, kidney, liver, bladder, pancreas etc. All of the organs of the body are exposed to cancer-causing agents. No part of the body remains untouched by the smoke.
  • 27.  
  • 28. QUIT SMOKING
  • 29. Roots of Mind Like the roots of a tree Mind likes to hold on to its structure firmly Attachment and fixation in time Are the sole objectives of mind
  • 30.  
  • 31. QUITTING PROCESS SMOKE PASSAGE OF TIME PASSAGE OF TIME “ WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS DEVELOP TOLERANCE TO NICOTINE SMOKE TO REDUCE WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS
  • 32.
    • When Smokers Quit-What Are the Benefits Over Time?
    • 20 minutes after quitting: Your blood pressure drops to a level close to that before the last cigarette. The temperature of your hands and feet increases to normal. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1988, pp. 39, 202)
    • 8 hours after quitting: The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1988, p. 202)
    • 24 hours after quitting: Your chance of a heart attack decreases. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1988, p. 202)
  • 33. 2 weeks to 3 months after quitting: Your circulation improves and your lung function increases up to 30%. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. 193, 194, 196, 285, 323) 1 to 9 months after quitting: Coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue, and shortness of breath decreases; cilia (tiny hair like structures that move mucus out of the lungs) regain normal function in the lungs, increasing the ability to handle mucus, clean the lungs, and reduce infection. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, pp. 304, 307, 319, 322)
  • 34.
    • 1 year after quitting: The excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker’s. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, p. vi)
    • 5 years after quitting: Your smoke risk is reduced to that of a nonsmoker 5-15 years after quitting. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, p. 79)
    • 10 years after quitting: The lung cancer death rate is about half that of a continuing smoker’s. The risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney and pancreas decreases. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, p. 110, 147, 152, 155, 159, 172)
    • 15 years after quitting: The risk of coronary heart disease is that of a nonsmoker’s. (US Surgeon General’s Report, 1990, p. 79)
  • 35. Visible and Immediate Rewards of Quitting Quitting helps stop the damaging effects of tobacco on your appearance including:  Premature wrinkling of the skin  Gum disease  Bad breath  Bad smelling clothes and hair  Stained teeth  Yellow fingernails Kicking the tobacco habit also offers benefits that you’ll notice immediately and some that will develop gradually in the first few weeks. These rewards can improve your day-to-day life substantially.  Food tastes  Sense of smell returns to normal  Ordinary activities no longer leave you out of breath (climbing stairs, light housework, etcetera) The prospect of better health is a major reason for quitting, but there are others as well. Smoking is expensive. The economic costs of smoking are estimated to be about $3,391 per smoker per year. Do you really want to continue burning up your money with nothing to show for it except possible health problems?
  • 36. You Can Quit Smoking Learn how to get help to quit smoking and improve your chances of quitting. This document explains the best ways for you to quit as well as new treatments to help. It lists new medications that can double or triple your chances of quitting and quitting for good. It also tells about ways to avoid relapses and talks about concerns you may have about quitting, including weight gain. All information is based on scientific research about what will give you the best chances of quitting. Nicotine: A Powerful Addiction If you have tried to quit smoking, you know how hard it can be. It is hard because nicotine is a very addictive drug. For some people, it can be as addictive as heroin or cocaine. Quitting takes hard work and a lot of effort, but you can quit smoking.
  • 37. Good Reason for Quitting
    • Quitting smoking is one of the most important things you will ever do:
    • You will live longer and live better
    • Quitting will lower your chance of having a heart attack, stroke or cancer.
    • If you are pregnant, quitting smoking will improve your chances of having a healthy baby.
    • The people you live with, especially your children, will be healthier.
    • You will have extra money to spend on things other than cigarettes.
  • 38. Five Keys for Quitting
    • Studies have shown that these five steps will help you quit for good. You have the best chances of quitting if you use them together:
    • Get ready
    • Get support
    • Learn new skills and behaviors
    • Get medication and use it correctly
    • Be prepared for relapse or difficult situations.
  • 39. 1. Get Ready
    • Set a quit date
    • Change your environment
      • Get rid of ALL cigarettes and ashtrays in your home, car, and place of work.
      • Don’t let people smoke in your home.
    • Review your past attempts to quite. Think about what worked and what did not.
    • Once you quit, don’t smoke – NOT EVEN A PUFF!
  • 40. 2. Get Support and Encouragement
    • Tell your family, friends and coworkers that you are going to quit and want their support. Ask them not to smoke around you or leave cigarettes out.
    • Talk to your health care provider (for example, doctor, dentist, nurse, pharmacist, psychologist, or smoking counselor).
    • Get individual, group, or telephone counseling. The counseling you have, the better your chances are of quitting. Programs are given at local hospitals and health centers. Call your local health department for information about programs in your area.
    Studies have shown that you have a better chance of being successful if you have help. You can get support in many ways:
  • 41. 3. Learn New Skills and Behaviors
    • Try to distract yourself from urges to smoke. Talk to someone, go for a walk or get busy with a task.
    • When you first try to quit, change your routine. Use a different route to work. Drink tea instead of coffee. Eat breakfast in a different place.
    • Do something to reduce your stress. Take a hot bath, exercise or read a book.
    • Drink a lot of water and other fluids.
  • 42. 4. Get Medication and Use It Correctly
    • Medications can help you stop smoking and lessen the urge to smoke.
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved five medications to help you quit smoking:
    • Bupropion SR – Available by prescription
    • Nicotine gum – Available over-the-counter
    • Nicotine inhaler – Available by prescription
    • Nicotine nasal spray – Available by prescription
    • Nicotine patch – Available by prescription and over-the-counter.
    • Ask your health care provider for advice and carefully read the information on the package.
    • All of these medications will more or less double your chances of quitting and quitting for good.
    • Everyone who is trying to quit may benefit from using a medication. If you are pregnant or trying to become pregnant, nursing, under age 18, smoking fewer than 10 cigarettes per day, or have a medical condition, talk to your doctor or other health care provider before taking medications.
  • 43. 5. Be Prepared for Relapse or Difficult Situations Most relapses occur within the first 3 months after quitting. Don’t be discouraged if you start smoking again. Remember, most people try several times before they finally quit. Here are some difficult situations to watch for:
    • Alcohol. Avoid drinking alcohol. Drinking lowers your chances of success.
    • Other smokers. Being around smoking can make you want to smoke.
    • Weight gain. Many smokers will gain weight when they quit, usually less than 10 pounds. Eat a healthy diet and stay active. Don’t let weight gain distract you from your main goal-quitting smoking. Some quit-smoking medications may help delay weight gain.
    • Bad mood or depression. There are a lot of ways to improve your mood other than smoking.
    If you are having problems with any of these situations, talk to your doctor or other health care provider.
  • 44. Special Situations or Conditions
    • Studies suggest that everyone can quit smoking. Your situation or condition can give you a special reason to quit.
    • Pregnant women/new mothers: By quitting, you protect your baby’s health and your own.
    • Hospitalized patients: By quitting, you reduce health problems and help healing.
    • Heart attack patients: By quitting, you reduce your risk of a second heart attack.
    • Lung, head, and neck cancer patients: By quitting, you reduce your chance of a second cancer.
    • Parents of children and adolescents: By quitting, you protect your children and adolescents from illnesses caused by second-hand smoke.
  • 45. Ways to quit smoking Immediate: Stop at once. This has been found to be the best way to quit smoking. But in the case of heavy smokers and those who have been smoking for a long time. “Cold Turkey” may not be the best method. Gradual: Reduce the number of cigarettes gradually each day till you reach the no smoking stage. Another option is to delay lighting up another cigarette until you can go through a day without smoking.
  • 46. Nicotine Replacement: Heavy smokers can use some form of nicotine replacement, which slowly releases small amounts of nicotine into the body. This allows the body to adjust its dependence on the drug. There is also the patch, inhaler, Lozenges or chewing gum, which slowly help wean off cigarettes.
  • 47. Tablets: The prescription drug, bupropion hydrochloride, does not contain Nicotine, but can help reduce craving and withdrawal symptoms. Some people get symptoms like dizziness, headaches and lack off concentration when they first stop smoking. Others may experience tangling sensations in their arms and legs. These and other symptoms go away after one or two weeks, as the body adjusts. Drink water to flush out the poisons from the body and symptoms go away faster.
  • 48. Curb the urge: Support from family and friends helps people stick to the decision to quit. But finally it is the individual will that matters.
  • 49. Where addictions Lies When smokers satisfy their urge for a cigarette, they dampen their mental resistance to addiction. Researchers at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor imaged smokers’ cerebral blood flow as they puffed on a cigarette after a night of nicotine abstinence. They also took images as the subjects smoked a low-nicotine cigarette. Comparing the two images removed signs of activity related to the non-nicotine aspects of smoking, leaving a map of pure nicotine stimulation. The drug intake increased blood flow in areas rich in nicotine receptors (left, orange). But it also decreased blood flow in areas involved in memory formation and regions that normally moderate drug-seeking behaviour (right). – Nicole Garbarini.
  • 50.  
  • 51. MEDITATION
    • Find a quite place
    • Close your Eyes
    • Pick a word, any word.
    • Say it again and again
    How to Meditate
  • 52. The first rule in prayer is to approach God only with legitimate desires. The second is to pray for their fulfillment, not as a beggar, but as a son: “I am thy child. Thou art my Father. Thou and I are One”. PRAYER
  • 53. For more help INNER SPACE KIZHAKKAYIL BUILDING KOTTARAMATTOM PALA P.O., PIN – 686 575 PH: 9447599673 Director: Prof. (Dr.) Sebastian K.L.