RRM Contingency Planning Presentation

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  • Concept: You should purposely have train issues, deaths, lightning, etc., because these are the races getting all the publicity these days!I am not a “know-it-all” – just a guy with a lot of experience, both good and bad. So everything I pass along today is from personal experience.
  • Except for Falmouth and Chicago.Carey said “everything goes smooth as silk.”
  • Who has had a crisis? No one gets away unscathed!
  • Except for Falmouth and Chicago.Carey said “everything goes smooth as silk.”
  • So, you want to be a Race Director, eh? The buck stops with you!
  • Pressure is a privilege.
  • Better to prevent fires versus having to have to put out fires.Lack of planning causes event management to turn into crisis management.
  • Weather – Boston 2007, Chicago, lightning. Runners can run in nasty weather, but we can’t always manage in any conditions.
  • Weather – Boston 2007, Chicago, lightning. Runners can run in nasty weather, but we can’t always manage in any conditions.
  • Batterson LakeManureWater main breakUSTS – 700 clubBAA half this yearLocked in port-o-john OTHERS…Deaths at races.Terrorism – suspicious packages, threats.Transportation issues.Timing chip malfunctions.Water, food, vendors do not show.Personal no shows.Officiating issues.Examples given from race directors – rapid fire a long list of crazy examples…photos?
  • Communication plan (photo of me with headset?)
  • Bring all key players together before the race (Table Top exercises)
  • Communication plan (photo of me with headset?)
  • Communication plan (photo of me with headset?)
  • Bring all key players together before the race (Table Top exercises)
  • Communication plan (photo of me with headset?)
  • Communication plan (photo of me with headset?)
  • Communication plan (photo of me with headset?)
  • Communication plan (photo of me with headset?)
  • Communication plan (photo of me with headset?)
  • Communication plan (photo of me with headset?)
  • Communication plan (photo of me with headset?)
  • Every race, no matter how well planned, will have some “Ah ha, we didn’t think of that!” moments.
  • Tell my story – Goodwill Games – hide behind tree – my fault.
  • Congratulations, race directors – you’re the mouse!
  • RRM Contingency Planning Presentation

    1. 1. “WHAT DO YOU DO IF…”A Guide to Contingency Planning for Road Race Directorsby Dave McGillivray<br />
    2. 2. CONTINGENCY PLAN<br />Who’s presenting today?<br />
    3. 3. It’s 90 degrees…I hear thunder…It’s the pothole from Hell…They ran out of ambulances…It’s starting to rain…The key person went home sick…The lead vehicle got lost…They didn’t obtain the permit…The bridge is going up…Someone died…The porta-potties are locked…The mayor is angry…The microphone doesn’t work…The road construction started early…We don’t have enough cups…A train is coming…The bibs are numbered wrong…The wind collapsed the tents…I thought YOU brought the zip ties…The forecast is for snow…The cops are on strike…The battery on the lift is dead…<br />WHY ME?<br />
    4. 4. MURPHY’S LAW<br />Yes, it applies to road races.<br />
    5. 5. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />MURPHY’S LAW<br />Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong!<br />McGILLIVRAY’S LAW<br />…And the EXPERIENCED event directoris PREPARED for it!<br />
    6. 6. PREPARATION<br />If you’re not prepared for EVERYTHING, you’re not prepared for ANYTHING.<br />
    7. 7. Who knowswhat thisimage is?<br />
    8. 8.
    9. 9. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />At least I’m not HIM!<br />
    10. 10. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />WHY ME???<br />
    11. 11. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />
    12. 12. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />COMMON PROBLEMS IN ROAD RACES<br />
    13. 13. WEATHERPROBLEMS<br />
    14. 14. “SMOOTH AS SILK”<br />…until the temperature hits 88 degrees with high humidity<br />
    15. 15. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />WEATHER PROBLEMS EXAMPLE #1<br />EVENT:<br />1987 California International Marathon<br />Sacramento, California<br />Submitted by John Mansoor<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>Hurricane winds of 50 mph
    16. 16. Driving rains
    17. 17. Falling trees</li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>Took down banners and tents
    18. 18. Race went on despite weather</li></li></ul><li>WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />WEATHER PROBLEMS EXAMPLE #2<br />EVENT:2007 Twin Cities MarathonMinneapolis-St. Paul, MinnesotaSubmitted by Brian Mastel<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>Temperatures reached high 80’s
    19. 19. Fluid consumption exceeded budget
    20. 20. Record drop-outs and strained medical resources</li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>Monitor and review hot weather plan with the Ops Team
    21. 21. Contacted the water supplier and bus companies early in the week to have additional resources on standby
    22. 22. Notify hospital ER's, followed Mass Casualty Incident plan</li></li></ul><li>COURSE<br />DISRUPTION<br />
    23. 23. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />COURSE DISRUPTION EXAMPLE #1<br />EVENT:<br />1992 KeyBank Vermont City Marathon<br />Vermont City, Vermont<br />Submitted by Joe Connelly<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>Rail yard lost job sheet
    24. 24. Rail yard employees began to move trains
    25. 25. Runners were still crossing tracks</li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>Course director parked vehicle on tracks</li></li></ul><li>WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />COURSE DISRUPTION EXAMPLE #2<br />EVENT:<br />2009 Fifth Third River Bank 25K Run<br />Grand Rapids, Michigan<br />Submitted by Kristen Aidif<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>Heavy flooding left standing water on course route with less than one week left to event
    26. 26. Event was USATF 25K national championship</li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>Quickly designed and certified new course
    27. 27. Notified participants and volunteers via email
    28. 28. Kept media informed throughout process</li></li></ul><li>WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />COURSE DISRUPTION EXAMPLE #3<br />EVENT:<br />2009 Wine Country Half Marathon<br />Santa Barbara, California<br />Submitted by Matt Dockstader<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>Jesusita Fire nearby evacuates 30,000 people, closes roads, jeopardizes air conditions and limits public safety personnel availability</li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>Used website, email and local media to keep runners and volunteers updated
    29. 29. Last minute weather improvements allowed race to go on with limited public safety staff</li></li></ul><li>DATABASE/TIMING<br />ISSUES<br />
    30. 30. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />DATABASE/TIMING ISSUES EXAMPLE<br />EVENT:<br />2008 Jingle Bell Run<br />Springfield, Illinois<br />Submitted by Alan Avery<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>Organizer re-sorted the participant database after printing packet labels then sends it to timer
    31. 31. Database submitted to timer did not match physical bibs handed out to participants</li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>Unused packets and numbers were quickly reassigned to pre-registered participants in alphabetical order</li></li></ul><li>PERSONNEL/PUBLIC SAFETYISSUES<br />
    32. 32. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />PERSONNAL/PUBLIC SAFETY ISSUES EXAMPLE<br />EVENT:<br />1979 Mardi Gras Marathon<br />New Orleans, Louisiana<br />Submitted by Mike Cambre<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>With only weeks left, the New Orleans Police Dept. went on strike, eliminating all public safety support.</li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>The event was moved to the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway which was shut down at both ends to accommodate the event.</li></li></ul><li>EQUIPMENT/MATERIALISSUES<br />
    33. 33. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />EQUIPMENT/MATERIAL ISSUES EXAMPLE #1<br />EVENT:<br />2009 Pittsburgh Marathon<br />Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania<br />Submitted by Patrice Matamoros<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>Days prior to the event, the cups from the water sponsor arrived. Upon opening the boxes, organizers discovered that the cups were styrofoam.
    34. 34. The sponsor insisted on their use.</li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>Organizers used the cups and were “slammed” by the participants for safety and environmental concerns. New specifications were established for future events.</li></li></ul><li>WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />EQUIPMENT/MATERIAL ISSUES EXAMPLE #2<br />EVENT:<br />2007 U.S. 10K Classic<br />Marietta, Georgia<br />Submitted by Skip Breeser<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>Water for a 7,500 participant race was parked in a secured compound with electronic metal fencing.
    35. 35. Lightening hit the gates the night before the event, disabling the electronic gate. </li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>With minutes to spare, the fire department’s emergency response team cut the gate open.</li></li></ul><li>EVENT CANCELLATION<br />
    36. 36. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />CANCELLATION EXAMPLE #1<br />EVENT:<br />2008 Miles for Moffitt<br />Tampa, Florida<br />Submitted by Susan Meadows<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>Wildfires burning in Georgia and north Florida forced cancellation of the race the day prior to the event.</li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>Disaster plan was executed – All participants, volunteers and general public were notified by email, radio PSAs, posters, all news media outlets, and board members at the event site on race morning
    37. 37. Event was rescheduled four weeks later.</li></li></ul><li>WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />CANCELLATION EXAMPLE #2<br />EVENT:<br />2003 Washington DC Marathon<br />Washington, DC<br />Submitted by Beth Salinger<br />CHALLENGES:<br /><ul><li>Iraq war began days prior to the event. Local officials urged its cancellation “due to security issues.”</li></ul>RESPONSE:<br /><ul><li>Email went out Wednesday after which the phones and inbound email were turned off.
    38. 38. Several hundred runners staged their own Unofficial Washington DC Marathon on the same course without public safety support or registration fees.</li></li></ul><li>WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING<br /><ul><li>Being PREPARED is the biggest asset.</li></li></ul><li>BE PREPARED.You have no idea when the shit storm will ensue.<br />
    39. 39. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING<br /><ul><li>Being PREPARED is the biggest asset.
    40. 40. Documentation provides emphasis and reference material.</li></li></ul><li>2009 CELLCOM GREEN BAY MARATHON<br />POST-START INCLEMENT WEATHER<br />COMMUNICATIONS FLOW<br />STAGE 1: SEVERE WEATHER* SPOTTED<br />“DECISION MAKING BOX”<br />Sean RyanRace Director(at Start)<br />Cal KrommRace Ops Mgr(in vehicle on course)<br />Dr. ObmaMedical Director<br />Div. Chief Dan GunnPublic Safety Director<br />National Weather Service<br />Water Station DirectorSarah Malooly<br />Local Public SafetyDirectors<br />Water StationCaptains<br />Public Safety Officers(Field)<br />*SEVERE WEATHER = LIGHTNING OR TORNADO<br />
    41. 41. Media Relations DirectorLisa Hildebrand<br />Lead / SAGVehiclesShauna Coleman<br />Info Tent<br />Sports Radio 107.5<br />Finish Line Announcer<br />WFRVTV-5<br />VIP Tent<br />OtherMedia<br />Lambeau<br />2009 CELLCOM GREEN BAY MARATHON<br />POST-START INCLEMENT WEATHER<br />COMMUNICATIONS FLOW<br />STAGE 2: EVENT CANCELED<br />“DECISION MAKING BOX”<br />Sean RyanRace Director(at Start)<br />Cal KrommRace Ops Mgt(in vehicle on course)<br />National Weather Service<br />Dr. ObmaMedical Director<br />Div. Chief Dan GunnPublic Safety Director<br />Communications DirectorBonnie Cayemberg<br />Water StationDirectorSarah Malooly<br />Technology DirectorJanet Process<br />Bus DirectorCindi Lawler<br />LocalPublic SafetyDirectors<br />Medical DirectorHeidi Gutschow<br />Water Station Captains<br />Medical Personnel<br />NetNetTechs<br />BusDrivers<br />Public Safety Officers(Field)<br />RUNNERS, VOLUNTEERS AND SPECTATORSMESSAGE: “Go to the nearest water station and wait for a shuttle to pick you up.”<br />
    42. 42. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING<br /><ul><li>Being PREPARED is the biggest asset.
    43. 43. Documentation provides emphasis and reference material.
    44. 44. Bring all key parties to the table BEFORE the race.</li></li></ul><li>INVOLVE ALL DEPARTMENTS.Avoid “we were neither asked nor informed.”<br />
    45. 45. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING<br /><ul><li>Being PREPARED is the biggest asset.
    46. 46. Documentation provides emphasis and reference material.
    47. 47. Bring all key parties to the table BEFORE the race.
    48. 48. Have constant follow up – Don’t assume everyone “GETS IT.”</li></li></ul><li>DUHThere’s one in every crowd.<br />
    49. 49. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING<br /><ul><li>Being PREPARED is the biggest asset.
    50. 50. Documentation provides emphasis and reference material.
    51. 51. Bring all key parties to the table BEFORE the race.
    52. 52. Have constant follow up – Don’t assume everyone “GETS IT.”
    53. 53. Have multiple fall back plans if possible (Plan B, Plan C, etc.)</li></li></ul><li>PLAN BA good back up plan never hurts.<br />
    54. 54. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING<br /><ul><li>Being PREPARED is the biggest asset.
    55. 55. Documentation provides emphasis and reference material.
    56. 56. Bring all key parties to the table BEFORE the race.
    57. 57. Have constant follow up – Don’t assume everyone “GETS IT.”
    58. 58. Have multiple fall back plans if possible (Plan B, Plan C, etc.)
    59. 59. Centralize communication and crisis decision making… Have a Unified Command Center and know who is in it.</li></li></ul><li>COMMAND CENTERJust pick someplace.<br />
    60. 60. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING<br /><ul><li>Being PREPARED is the biggest asset.
    61. 61. Documentation provides emphasis and reference material.
    62. 62. Bring all key parties to the table BEFORE the race.
    63. 63. Have constant follow up – Don’t assume everyone “GETS IT.”
    64. 64. Have multiple fall back plans if possible (Plan B, Plan C, etc.)
    65. 65. Centralize communication and crisis decision making… Have a Unified Command Center and know who is in it.
    66. 66. Timing is critical–WHEN it happens is as important as WHAT.</li></li></ul><li>TIMINGYou go inside BEFORE the giant wave of doom hits.<br />
    67. 67. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING<br /><ul><li>Being PREPARED is the biggest asset.
    68. 68. Documentation provides emphasis and reference material.
    69. 69. Bring all key parties to the table BEFORE the race.
    70. 70. Have constant follow up – Don’t assume everyone “GETS IT.”
    71. 71. Have multiple fall back plans if possible (Plan B, Plan C, etc.)
    72. 72. Centralize communication and crisis decision making… Have a Unified Command Center and know who is in it.
    73. 73. Timing is critical–WHEN it happens is as important as WHAT.
    74. 74. Make sure all information is CREDIBLE.</li></li></ul><li>CREDIBLE INFORMATIONMake sure it’s objective and verifiable .<br />
    75. 75. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING<br /><ul><li>Being PREPARED is the biggest asset.
    76. 76. Documentation provides emphasis and reference material.
    77. 77. Bring all key parties to the table BEFORE the race.
    78. 78. Have constant follow up – Don’t assume everyone “GETS IT.”
    79. 79. Have multiple fall back plans if possible (Plan B, Plan C, etc.)
    80. 80. Centralize communication and crisis decision making… Have a Unified Command Center and know who is in it.
    81. 81. Timing is critical–WHEN it happens is as important as WHAT.
    82. 82. Make sure all information is CREDIBLE.
    83. 83. A solid race day communication system/plan is essential.</li></li></ul><li>COMMUNICATIONS PLANFunction over fashion<br />
    84. 84. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />BEST PRACTICES FOR CONTINGENCY PLANNING<br /><ul><li>Being PREPARED is the biggest asset.
    85. 85. Documentation provides emphasis and reference material.
    86. 86. Bring all key parties to the table BEFORE the race.
    87. 87. Have constant follow up – Don’t assume everyone “GETS IT.”
    88. 88. Have multiple fall back plans if possible (Plan B, Plan C, etc.)
    89. 89. Centralize communication and crisis decision making… Have a Unified Command Center and know who is in it.
    90. 90. Timing is critical–WHEN it happens is as important as WHAT.
    91. 91. Make sure all information is CREDIBLE.
    92. 92. A solid race day communication system/plan is essential.
    93. 93. Accept that you can’t anticipate EVERYTHING.</li></li></ul><li>D’OH!Expect it once per race minimum.<br />
    94. 94. “If all other contingency plans fail, we do have one final backup plan…”<br />
    95. 95.
    96. 96. CRISIS MANAGEMENTRecognize when you are in over your head.<br />
    97. 97. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />CRISIS MANAGEMENT is the process by which an organization deals with a major unpredictable event that threatens to harm the organization, its stakeholders, or the general public. Three elements are common to most definitions of crisis: (a) a threat to the organization, (b) the element of surprise, and (c) a short decision time.<br />(Wikipedia 2009)<br />
    98. 98. CRISIS LEADERSHIPIf all else fails, hide behind a tree!<br />
    99. 99. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />REMEMBER<br />DON’T PANIC!!!<br />
    100. 100.
    101. 101. WHAT DO YOU DO IF…? A Guide to Contingency Planning<br />Three cornerstonesof CRISIS MANAGEMENT<br />OPERATIONS<br />What should be done immediately to solve the crisis?<br />HUMAN RELATIONS<br />How and when to deal with those involved?How to keep them focused on primary objectives?<br />PUBLIC RELATIONS<br />Who needs to know?How should the information be communicated?<br />
    102. 102. MITIGATION & PREVENTION<br />PREPAREDNESS<br />Contingency planningandCRISIS MANAGEMENT…a neverending process<br />RESPONSE<br />RECOVERY<br />
    103. 103. PREPARATION“By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”Benjamin Franklin<br />

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