Physics 2 notes:  WAVES ONLY- Notes on the difference between longitudinal, transverse, & electromagnetic waves with illustrations, LABS, and video links
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Physics 2 notes: WAVES ONLY- Notes on the difference between longitudinal, transverse, & electromagnetic waves with illustrations, LABS, and video links

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Notes on the difference between longitudinal, transverse, & electromagnetic waves with illustrations, LABS, and video links

Notes on the difference between longitudinal, transverse, & electromagnetic waves with illustrations, LABS, and video links

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  • 1. Physics 2 WAVES ppt. by Robin D. Seamon (Heat & Temperature Energy Waves)
  • 2.
    • temperature: average kinetic Energy of particles in an object
    Solid Liquid Gas http://www.bcssa.org/newsroom/scholarships/great8sci/Matter/Choose_Matter.html The more kinetic E the higher the temp. Interactive LAB
  • 3.
    • Thermometer : thin glass tube filled with mercury or alcohol
    • Thermal expansion: temp goes up, volume goes up b/c particles spread out
    • examples: thermometer, hwy joints, bimetallic strips in thermostats
    Kelvin 0 = when all molecular motion stops 32 °F 0 °C 273 °K 98.6 °F 37 °C 310 °K 212 °F 100 °C 373 °K Farenheit Celcius Kelvin
  • 4. Thermostat:
  • 5.
    • Conduit: conducts/ allows Energy transfer; water, metal
    • Insulator: does not allow Energy transfer; fiberglass, cardboard, air, cork, wood, rubber, wood
    • Heat: Energy transferred between objects at different temperatures; thermal Energy If two objects are connected, there is always transfer between high temp to low temp
    • Thermal equilibrium Energy transfer until the same temperature on both
  • 6. Put ‘C’ for Conductor & ‘I’ for Insulator. Curling iron oven mitt ceramic bowl iron skillet stove coil cookie sheet plastic spatula fiberglass insulation copper pipe
  • 7.
    • Conduction transfer of thermal energy through direct contact
    • Convection transfer of thermal energy by movement of liquid/gas (hot up, cold down)
    • Radiation transfer of thermal energy by electromagnetic waves (visible light & ultraviolet waves)
  • 8. Which changes temperature faster: --air, water? Can’t measure transferred E directly; must be calculated: Heat (J) = specific heat x mass x change in temp
  • 9. LAB: Feel the Heat
    • Procedure :
    • Bundle the nails together with a rubber band. Record the mass. Tie string around, leaving one end 15 cm long.
    • Put bundle of nails into a cup, letting string dangle out. Fill the cup with hot water, covering nails. Set aside 5 min.
    • Use graduated cylinder to measure enough cold water to exactly the mass of nails. Record.
    • Measure & record the temp of the hot water with the nails & temp of cold water.
    • Use string to transfer the bundle of nails to the cup of cold water. Use the thermometer to monitor the temperature of water-nail mixture. When the temp stops changing record this final temp.
    • Empty cups, dry nails. Repeat for trial 2, but switch the hot & cold water. Record data.
    • Conclusion:
    • The cold water in Trial 1 gained energy. Where did the E come from? How does the E gained by the nails in Trial 2 compare with the E lost by the hot water in Trial 2? Which material seems to be able to hold E better… iron or water?
    p. 430 Materials : balance, 2 cups, cylinder, 10 nails, string, rubber band, thermometer, hot water, cold water 2 1 Final temp of water and nails combined Initial temp of water to which nails will be transferred Initial temp. of water & nails Volume of water that equals mass of nails (mL) Mass of nails (g) Trial
  • 10. WAVES SCIENCE SONGS
  • 11.
    • Wave: disturbance than transmits Energy through matter or empty space;
    • --as wave travels it does work on everything in its path
    • Mechanical waves : need a medium examples- sound wave, ocean wave
    • Some waves don’t need a medium examples- visible light, microwaves, tv, radio signals, x-rays
  • 12. Compression waves pressed close together Rarefraction waves stretched farther apart Example: sound wave
  • 13. Rarefraction Transverse Wave Longitudinal Wave
  • 14.  
  • 15.  
  • 16. Waves: Transverse wave- particles move up & down, perpendicular to direction wave is going Longitudinal wave- particle move horizontally along the wave in the direction the wave is moving Surface wave - combination of transverse & longitudinal wave VIDEO: HSW Wavelength Basics ADVANCE
  • 17. Transverse wave- particles move up & down, perpendicular to direction wave is going BACK
  • 18. Longitudinal wave- particle move horizontally along the wave in the direction the wave is moving BACK
  • 19. Surface Waves HSW: Waves of Destruction Surface Waves (3 min) BACK
  • 20.  
  • 21.
    • Properties of Waves
    • Amplitude: maximum distance the particles vibrate
    • Wavelength: distance between two crests or compressions in a wave
    • Frequency: number of waves in a given amount of time
    • Wave speed: speed at which wave travels (v)
  • 22. Wave Interactions reflection - wave bounces back after hitting a barrier; examples: light reflected lets us see it sound echoes refraction - bending of a wave as it passes from one medium to another at an angle (because wave changes speed in a different medium) example: light through a prism (light is dispersed into separate colors) HSW: Exploring sound, Reverberation (3 min)
  • 23. Diffraction bending of waves around a barrier Interference two or move waves overlap - constructive interference 2 waves overlap crests & troughs, combining both waves’ energy… makes it stronger! -destructive interference 2 waves overlap one crest on one trough, cancels out each other’s Energy HSW: Assignment Discovery: Sound/Interference (1 ½ min) Ripple Tank Simulation
  • 24.  
  • 25.  
  • 26. Standing waves: pattern looks like wave is standing still Resonance: two objects naturally vibrate at the same frequency; sound of one causes the other to vibrate VIDEO: Sound/Resonance-Shattering glass (15 min) United Streaming
  • 27.  
  • 28. LAB: Musical Instruments
  • 29. SCIENCE SONGS
  • 30.
    • HSW: Exploring Sound (23 min) not saved
    • HSW: Exploring Light ( 3 min) not saved
    • Physical Science: Light ( 20 min)
    • Physical Science: Sound ( 20 min)