Chi Test

2,044 views
1,947 views

Published on

Co-Author Rosetta Jones and sharon Tutt Statistical Analysis using the Chi-Test on Domestic Violence

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,044
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chi Test

  1. 1. Null Hypothesis: The use of knives in domestic violence incidents has significantly changed during 1994 and 1995. Research Hypothesis: The use of knives in domestic violence incidents has not changed during 1994 and 1995. Our hypothesis is drawn from a sampling that observed 1994 and 1995 aggravated and non-aggravated assault charges drawn from the Statistical Crime Data for the State of Maryland, c. 1995. The one-way chi-test can be usedto determine whether the frequencies observed differs significantly from an even distribution (or any other distribution hypothesized).What should the frequency distribution of correct observances look like if the null hypothesis were true? The charts below demonstrate twocategories with the anticipation that 50% of the reported results should fall in each classification. With 20.378 incidents for 1994 and 24.021 for1995, we should expect 4.08 occurrences (in 1994) and 4.80 occurrences (in 1995) in each Type of Weapon Category. The expected frequencies arethose frequencies that are expected to occur under the term of the Null Hypothesis.1994 (In Hundreds) fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Type of Weapons feFirearm .272 4.08 -3.80 14.44 3.5Knife .849 4.08 -3.23 10.43 2.6Other Dangerous 1.423 4.08 -2.66 7.08 1.7WeaponsHands, Fists, Feet, .667 4.08 -3.41 11.63 2.9etc.Non-Aggravated 17.167 4.08 13.09 171.3 41.9 Total 20.378 52.61995 (In Hundreds) fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Type of Weapons feFirearm .252 4.80 -2.28 5.19 1.1
  2. 2. Knife 1.074 4.80 -3.73 13.91 2.9Other Dangerous 1.771 4.80 -3.03 9.18 1.9WeaponsHands, Fists, Feet, .672 4.80 -4.13 17.06 3.6etc.Non-Aggravated 20.252 4.80 15.45 238.70 49.7 Total 24.021 59.2 Null Hypothesis: The use of knives in domestic violence incidents has significantly changed during 1994 and 1995. Research Hypothesis: The use of knives in domestic violence incidents has not changed during 1994 and 1995. (Continued)The chi-squared method allows us to test the significance of the difference between a set of observed frequencies and expected frequencies.Based on just the observed and expected frequencies, the formula for chi-square is: (fo - fe)2 X2 = Σ fewhere fo = observed frequency in any categoryfe = expected frequency in any categoryOur next step is to interpret the chi-square value by determining the appropriate degrees of freedom. df = k - 1where k = number of categories in the observed frequency distribution. Our example shows 5 categories (firearms; knives; other dangerous weapons;hands, fists, feet, etc.; and non-aggravated) in 1994 and 1995:
  3. 3. df = 5 - 1 = 4Now by checking The Critical Value of Chi-Square at the .05 and .01 Chart, we look for the .05 significant level to check 4 degrees of freedom. Thevalue is 9.488. This is the value that we must exceed before we can reject the null hypothesis. Because our calculated chi-square for 1994 is 52.6 andfor 1995 is 59.2, it is larger than the table value, we reject the null hypothesis and accept the research hypothesis. The observed frequencies do differsignificantly from the expected occurrence for an equal distribution under the null hypothesis for knife usage in domestic violence situations. In comparing the chi-squared test to our obtained frequencies, the reported sampling did not indicate a perfectly even distribution (4.08 in 1994 and 4.80 in 1995 for each type of weapon), the degree of unevenness was sufficiently large. Null Hypothesis: Unknown factors do not play a significant role in domestic violence occurrences during 1994 and 1995. Research Hypothesis: Unknown factors do play a significant role in domestic violence occurrences during 1994 and 1995.This hypothesis was also taken from a sampling that observed 1994 and 1995 unknown factors indomestic violence drawn from The Statistical Crime Data for the State of Maryland, c. 1995.Again, the one-way chi-test will be used to determine whether the frequencies observed differssignificantly from an even distribution (or any other distribution hypothesized).We want to demonstrate if this frequency distribution for unknown factors shows if the nullhypothesis is true? The charts below demonstrate two categories with the anticipation that 50% ofthe reported results should fall in each classification. With 20.378 incidents for 1994 and 24.021incidents for 1995, we should expect .926 occurrences (in 1994) and 1.091 occurrences (in 1995)for each year’s Circumstances Category. The expected frequencies are those incidents that areexpected to occur under the term of the Null Hypothesis.1994 (In fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Hundreds)
  4. 4. Circumstances feAlcohol 2.686 .926 1.76 3.098 3.4Drugs .373 .926 -0.553 .306 .3Food/Cooking .100 .926 -0.826 .682 .7Friends .169 .926 -0.757 .573 .6Gambling .005 .926 -0.921 .848 .9Household .128 .926 -0.798 .637 .7ChoresInfidelity 1.055 .926 0.129 .017 0Employment/Job .104 .926 -0.822 .676 .7Mental .090 .926 -0.836 .699 .8ImbalanceMoney .817 .926 -0.109 .012 0Children .914 .926 -0.012 1.44 1.6Property .609 .926 -0.317 .100 .1Relative .114 .926 -0.812 .659 .7Sex .168 .926 -0.758 .575 .6Hobby .011 .926 -0.915 .837 .9T.V. .054 .926 -0.872 .760 .8
  5. 5. Separation .628 .926 -0.298 .089 .1Divorce .129 .926 -0.797 .635 .7Reconciliation .030 .926 -0.896 .803 .9Out Late .398 .926 -0.528 .279 .3Other 3.716 .926 2.79 7.784 8.4Unknown 8.080 .926 7.154 51.180 55.3 Total 20.378 78.51995 (In fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Hundreds) feCircumstancesAlcohol 3.139 1.091 2.048 4.194 3.8Drugs .458 1.091 -.633 .401 .4Food/Cooking .163 1.091 -.928 .861 .8Friends .278 1.091 -.813 .661 .6Gambling .012 1.091 -1.079 1.164 .1Household .162 1.091 -.929 .863 .8ChoresInfidelity 1.372 1.091 .281 .079 .1Employment/Job .122 1.091 -.969 .939 .9
  6. 6. Mental .110 1.091 -.981 .962 .9ImbalanceMoney 1.043 1.091 .048 2.304 2.1Children 1.181 1.091 .09 8.1 7.4Property .963 1.091 -.128 .016 .0Relative .202 1.091 -.889 .790 1.4Sex .224 1.091 -.867 .752 .7Hobby .011 1.091 -1.08 1.166 .1T.V. .061 1.091 -1.03 1.061 .9Separation .901 1.091 .19 .036 .0Divorce .162 1.091 .929 .863 .8Reconciliation .037 1.091 1.054 1.111 1.0Out Late .510 1.091 -.581 .338 .3Other 2.877 1.091 1.786 3.190 2.9Unknown 10.033 1.091 8.942 79.96 73.29 Total 24.021 101.29 Null Hypothesis: Unknown factors do not play a significant role in domestic violence occurrences during 1994 and 1995.
  7. 7. Research Hypothesis: Unknown factors do play a significant role in domestic violence occurrences during 1994 and 1995. (Continued)The chi-squared method allows us to test the significance of the difference between a set of observed frequencies and expected frequencies.Based on just the observed and expected frequencies, the formula for chi-square is: (fo - fe)2 X2 = Σ fewhere fo = observed frequency in any categoryfe = expected frequency in any categoryOur next step is to interpret the chi-square value by determining the appropriate degrees of freedom. df = k - 1where k = number of categories in the observed frequency distribution. Our example shows 22 categories (Alcohol, Drugs, Food/Cooking, Friends,Gambling, Household Chores, Infidelity, Employment/Job, Mental Imbalance, Money, Children, Property, Relative, Sex, Hobby, T.V., Separation,Divorce, Reconciliation, Out Late, Other and Unknown) in 1994 and 1995: df = 22 - 1 = 21Now by checking The Critical Value of Chi-Square at the .05 and .01 Chart, we look for the .05 significant level to check 21 degrees of freedom. Thevalue is 32.671. This is the value that we must exceed before we can reject the null hypothesis. Because our calculated chi-square for 1994 is 78.5and for 1995 is 101.29, it is larger than the table value, we reject the null hypothesis and accept the research hypothesis. The observed frequencies dodiffer significantly from the expected occurrence for an equal distribution under the null hypothesis for unknown factors in domestic violencesituations.In comparing the chi-squared test to our obtained frequencies, the reported sampling did not indicate a perfectly even distribution (.926 in 1994 and1.091 in 1995 for each circumstance), the degree of unevenness was sufficiently large.
  8. 8. Null Hypothesis: The morning hours have an effect on domestic violence during 1994 and 1995. Research Hypothesis: The morning hours have no effect on domestic violence during 1994 and 1995.The above hypothesis was also taken from a sampling that observed domestic violence’s 1994 and1995 incidents occurring in the morning hours. This sample was also drawn from The StatisticalCrime Data for the State of Maryland, c. 1995. Again, the one-way chi-test will be used todetermine whether the frequencies observed differs significantly from an even distribution (or anyother distribution hypothesized).We want to demonstrate if this frequency distribution for the morning hours shows if the nullhypothesis is true? The charts below demonstrate two categories with the anticipation that 50% ofthe reported results should fall in each classification. With 76.95 incidents for 1994 and 93.57incidents for 1995, we should expect 6.41 morning occurrences (in 1994) and 7.80 morningoccurrences (in 1995) for each year’s Morning Hours Category. The expected frequencies are thoseincidents that are expected to occur under the term of the Null Hypothesis.1994 (In Hundreds) fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Morning Hours fe12:00 A.M. 9.85 6.41 3.44 11.83 1.81:00 A.M. 10.6 6.41 4.19 17.56 2.72:00 A.M. 8.34 6.41 1.93 3.72 .63:00 A.M. 6.38 6.41 -.03 9 1.4
  9. 9. 4:00 A.M. 4.33 6.41 -2.08 4.33 .75:00 A.M. 2.92 6.41 -3.49 12.18 1.96:00 A.M. 3.22 6.41 -3.19 10.17 1.67:00 A.M. 3.29 6.41 -3.12 9.73 1.58:00 A.M. 4.58 6.41 -1.83 3.35 .59:00 A.M. 5.92 6.41 -.49 .24 .010:00 A.M. 7.91 6.41 1.5 2.25 .411:00 A.M. 9.61 6.41 3.2 10.24 1.6 Total 76.95 14.71995 (In Hundreds) fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Morning Hours fe12:00 A.M. 12.89 7.8 5.09 25.9 3.31:00 A.M. 13.17 7.8 5.37 28.8 3.72:00 A.M. 10.7 7.8 2.9 8.41 1.13:00 A.M. 8.02 7.8 .22 .04 5.14:00 A.M. 4.97 7.8 -2.83 8 15:00 A.M. 3.79 7.8 -4.01 16 2.16:00 A.M. 3.44 7.8 -4.36 19 2.4
  10. 10. 7:00 A.M. 4.17 7.8 -3.63 13.2 1.7 8:00 A.M. 5.45 7.8 -2.35 5.52 .7 9:00 A.M. 7.22 7.8 -.58 .34 0 10:00 A.M. 9.34 7.8 1.54 2.37 .3 11:00 A.M. 10.41 7.8 2.61 6.81 .9 Total 93.57 22.3 Null Hypothesis: The morning hours have an effect on domestic violence occurrences during 1994 and 1995. Research Hypothesis: The morning hours have no effect on domestic violence occurrences during 1994 and 1995. (Continued)The chi-squared method allows us to test the significance of the difference between a set of observed frequencies and expected frequencies.Based on just the observed and expected frequencies, the formula for chi-square is: (fo - fe)2 X2 = Σ fewhere fo = observed frequency in any categoryfe = expected frequency in any categoryOur next step is to interpret the chi-square value by determining the appropriate degrees of freedom.
  11. 11. df = k - 1where k = number of categories in the observed frequency distribution. Our example shows 12 categories (from 12:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m.) in 1994and 1995: df = 12 - 1 = 11Now by checking The Critical Value of Chi-Square at the .05 and .01 Chart, we look for the .05 significant level to check 11 degrees of freedom. Thevalue is 19.675. This is the value that we must exceed before we can reject the null hypothesis. Because our calculated chi-square for 1994 is 14.7and for 1995 is 22.3, it is smaller than the table value, we accept the null hypothesis and reject the research hypothesis. The observed frequencies donot differ significantly from the expected occurrence for an equal distribution under the null hypothesis for morning incidents in domestic violencesituations.In comparing the chi-squared test to our obtained frequencies, the reported sampling did indicate a perfectly even distribution (6.41 in 1994 and 7.8in 1995 for each circumstance) for the Morning Hours Category in 1994. However, comparing the chi-squared test to our obtained frequencies for theMorning Hours Category in 1995, the reported sampling did not indicate a perfectly even distribution (6.41 in 1994 and 7.8 in 1995 for eachcircumstance) the degree of unevenness was significantly large. Null Hypothesis: The afternoon hours have an effect on domestic violence occurrences during 1994 and 1995. Research Hypothesis: The afternoon hours have no affect on domestic violence occurrences during 1994 and 1995.The above hypothesis was also taken from a sampling that observed domestic violence 1994 and1995 incidents occurring in the afternoon hours. This sample was also drawn from The StatisticalCrime Data for the State of Maryland, c. 1995. Again, the one-way chi-test will be used todetermine whether the frequencies observed differs significantly from an even distribution (or anyother distribution hypothesized).We want to demonstrate if this frequency distribution for the afternoon hours shows if the nullhypothesis is true? The charts below demonstrate two categories with the anticipation that 50% ofthe reported results should fall in each classification. With 76.95 incidents for 1994 and 93.57
  12. 12. incidents for 1995, we should expect 5 morning occurrences (in 1994) and 6 morning occurrences(in 1995) for each year’s Afternoon Hours Category. The expected frequencies are those incidentsthat are expected to occur under the term of the Null Hypothesis.1994 (In Hundreds) fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Afternoon Hours fe12:00 P.M. 8.17 10.57 -2.4 5.76 .51:00 P.M. 6.79 10.57 -3.78 14.29 1.42:00 P.M. 9.43 10.57 -1.14 1.3 .13:00 P.M. 9.89 10.57 -.068 .46 04:00 P.M. 9.99 10.57 -.58 .34 05:00 P.M. 8.87 10.57 -1.7 2.89 .36:00 P.M. 10 10.57 -.57 .32 07:00 P.M. 11.58 10.57 1.01 1.02 .18:00 P.M. 11.93 10.57 1.36 1.85 .29:00 P.M. 12.57 10.57 2 4 .410:00 P.M. 13.98 10.57 3.41 11.63 1.111:00 P.M. 13.63 10.57 3.06 9.36 .9 Total 76.95 51995 (In Hundreds) fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2
  13. 13. Afternoon Hours fe12:00 P.M. 10.42 12.22 -1.8 25.9 .31:00 P.M. 8.09 12.22 -4.13 28.8 1.42:00 P.M. 10.05 12.22 -2.17 8.41 .43:00 P.M. 10.66 12.22 -1.56 .04 .24:00 P.M. 10.43 12.22 -1.79 8 .35:00 P.M. 10.05 12.22 -2.17 16 .46:00 P.M. 11.61 12.22 -.61 19 07:00 P.M. 13.21 12.22 .99 13.2 08:00 P.M. 14.34 12.22 2.12 5.52 .49:00 P.M. 15.23 12.22 3.01 .34 .710:00 P.M. 16.08 12.22 3.86 2.37 1.211:00 P.M. 16.47 12.22 4.25 6.81 .7 Total 146.64 6 Null Hypothesis: The afternoon hours have an effect on domestic violence occurrences during 1994 and 1995. Research Hypothesis: The afternoon hours have no effect on domestic violence occurrences during 1994 and 1995.
  14. 14. (Continued)The chi-squared method allows us to test the significance of the difference between a set of observed frequencies and expected frequencies.Based on just the observed and expected frequencies, the formula for chi-square is: (fo - fe)2 X2 = Σ fewhere fo = observed frequency in any categoryfe = expected frequency in any categoryOur next step is to interpret the chi-square value by determining the appropriate degrees of freedom. df = k - 1where k = number of categories in the observed frequency distribution. Our example shows 12 categories (from 12:00 p.m. through 11:00 p.m.) in1994 and 1995: df = 12 - 1 = 11Now by checking The Critical Value of Chi-Square at the .05 and .01 Chart, we look for the .05 significant level to check 11 degrees of freedom. Thevalue is 19.675. This is the value that we must exceed before we can reject the null hypothesis. Because our calculated chi-square for 1994 is 5 andfor 1995 is 6, it is smaller than the table value, we accept the null hypothesis and reject the research hypothesis. The observed frequencies do notdiffer significantly from the expected occurrence for an equal distribution under the null hypothesis for morning incidents in domestic violencesituations.In comparing the chi-squared test to our obtained frequencies, the reported sampling did indicate a perfectly even distribution (10.57 in 1994 and12.22 in 1995 for each circumstance). Null Hypothesis: The months of the year have an effect on domestic violence during 1994 and 1995.
  15. 15. Research Hypothesis: The months of the year have no affect on domestic violence during 1994 and 1995.The above hypothesis was also taken from a sampling that observed domestic violence 1994 and1995 incidents occurring in the month of the year. This sample was also drawn from The StatisticalCrime Data for the State of Maryland, c. 1995. Again, the one-way chi-test will be used todetermine whether the frequencies observed differs significantly from an even distribution (or anyother distribution hypothesized).We want to demonstrate if this frequency distribution for the month of the year shows if the nullhypothesis is true? The charts below demonstrate two categories with the anticipation that 50% ofthe reported results should fall in each classification. With 20.378 incidents for 1994 and 24.021incidents for 1995, we should expect 1.7 monthly occurrences (in 1994) and 2 monthly occurrences(in 1995) for each of the year’s Month of the Year Category. The expected frequencies are thoseincidents that are expected to occur under the term of the Null Hypothesis.1994 (In Hundreds) fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Month of Year feJanuary 1.542 1.7 -.158 .03 .014February 1.486 1.7 -.214 .05 .027March 1.734 1.7 .034 .001 0April 1.710 1.7 .01 0 0May 1.690 1.7 -.01 0 0
  16. 16. June 1.705 1.7 .005 0 0July 1.822 1.7 .122 .01 0August 1.812 1.7 .112 .01 0September 1.834 1.7 .134 .02 0October 1.804 1.7 .104 .01 0November 1.666 1.7 .034 .001 0December 1.573 1.7 .127 .02 0 Total 20.378 .0411995 (In Hundreds) fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Month of Year feJanuary 1.937 2 -.063 .001 .005February 1.526 2 -.474 .224 .112March 1.941 2 -.059 .002 .001April 1.906 2 -.094 .001 .005May 2.128 2 .128 .02 .01June 2.046 2 .046 2.12 1.06July 2.277 2 .277 .08 .139August 2.181 2 .181 .03 .015
  17. 17. September 2.003 2 .003 0 0October 1.986 2 -.014 0 0November 1.918 2 -.082 .006 .003December 2.172 2 .172 .029 .015 Total 24.021 1.365 Null Hypothesis: The months of the year have an effect on domestic violence during 1994 and 1995. Research Hypothesis: The months of the year have no effect on domestic violence during 1994 and 1995. (Continued)The chi-squared method allows us to test the significance of the difference between a set of observed frequencies and expected frequencies.Based on just the observed and expected frequencies, the formula for chi-square is: (fo - fe)2 X2 = Σ fewhere fo = observed frequency in any categoryfe = expected frequency in any categoryOur next step is to interpret the chi-square value by determining the appropriate degrees of freedom. df = k - 1where k = number of categories in the observed frequency distribution. Our example shows 12 categories (from January through December) in 1994and 1995:
  18. 18. df = 12 - 1 = 11Now by checking The Critical Value of Chi-Square at the .05 and .01 Chart, we look for the .05 significant level to check 11 degrees of freedom. Thevalue is 19.675. This is the value that we must exceed before we can reject the null hypothesis. Because our calculated chi-square for 1994 is .041and for 1995 is 1.365, it is smaller than the table value, we accept the null hypothesis and reject the research hypothesis. The observed frequencies donot differ significantly from the expected occurrence for an equal distribution under the null hypothesis for monthly incidents in domestic violencesituations.In comparing the chi-squared test to our obtained frequencies, the reported sampling did indicate a perfectly even distribution (1.7 in 1994 and 2 in1995 for each circumstance). Null Hypothesis: The day of the week has an affect on domestic violence occurring in 1994 and 1995. Research Hypothesis: The day of the week has no effect on domestic violence occurring in 1994 and 1995.The above hypothesis was also taken from a sampling that observed domestic violence 1994 and1995 incidents occurring on a certain day of the week. This sample was also drawn from TheStatistical Crime Data for the State of Maryland, c. 1995. Again, the one-way chi-test will be used to determine whether the frequencies observed differs significantly from an even distribution (or any other distribution hypothesized). We want to demonstrate if this frequency distribution for the day of the week shows if the null hypothesis is true? The charts below demonstrate two categories with the anticipation that 50% of the reported results should fall in each classification. With20.378 incidents for 1994 and 24.021 incidents for 1995, we should expect 2.911 monthlyoccurrences (in 1994) and 3.432 monthly occurrences (in 1995) for each of the year’s Day of theWeek Category. The expected frequencies are those incidents that are expected to occur under theterm of the Null Hypothesis.
  19. 19. 1994 (In Hundreds) fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Day of Week feMonday 3.017 2.911 .106 .011 .003Tuesday 2.703 2.911 -.208 .043 .015Wednesday 2.457 2.911 -.454 .206 .07Thursday 2.479 2.911 -.432 .187 ..064Friday 2.846 2.911 -.065 .004 .001Saturday 3.290 2.911 .379 .144 .049Sunday 3.586 2.911 .675 .456 .157 Total 20.378 .3591995 (In Hundreds) fo fe fo - fe (fo - fe)2 (fo - fe)2Day of Week feMonday 3.322 3.432 -.11 .012 3.5Tuesday 3.246 3.432 -.186 .346 .01Wednesday 3.019 3.432 -.413 .171 .05Thursday 2.956 3.432 -.476 .227 .07Friday 3.207 3.432 -.225 .051 .01Saturday 3.980 3.432 .548 .3 .08
  20. 20. Sunday 4.291 3.432 .859 .738 .02 Total 24.021 3.74 Null Hypothesis: The day of the week has an effect on domestic violence occurring in 1994 and 1995. Research Hypothesis: The day of the week has no effect on domestic violence occurring in 1994 and 1995. (Continued)The chi-squared method allows us to test the significance of the difference between a set of observed frequencies and expected frequencies. Based on just the observed and expected frequencies, the formula for chi-square is: (fo - fe)2 X2 = Σ fewhere fo = observed frequency in any categoryfe = expected frequency in any categoryOur next step is to interpret the chi-square value by determining the appropriate degrees of freedom. df = k - 1where k = number of categories in the observed frequency distribution. Our example shows 7 categories (from Monday through Sunday) in 1994 and1995: df = 7 - 1 = 6Now by checking The Critical Value of Chi-Square at the .05 and .01 Chart, we look for the .05 significant level to check 6 degrees of freedom. Thevalue is 12.592. This is the value that we must exceed before we can reject the null hypothesis. Because our calculated chi-square for 1994 is .359and for 1995 is 3.74, it is smaller than the table value, we accept the null hypothesis and reject the research hypothesis. The observed frequencies do
  21. 21. not differ significantly from the expected occurrence for an equal distribution under the null hypothesis for day of the week incidents in domesticviolence situations.In comparing the chi-squared test to our obtained frequencies, the reported sampling did indicate a perfectly even distribution (2.911 in 1994 and3.432 in 1995 for each circumstance). INTRODUCTIONThe act of domestic violence has no label. It could happen to any gender, at any age andin any occupation. Domestic violence can also take on the form of mental, physical,verbal, emotional, and psychological abuse. The ultimate goal of a domestic violenceabuser is to have total control and power over another person. This situation can beinflicted upon anyone at anytime. Russell Hovan’s perspective states, “There aresituations in life to which the only satisfactory response is a physically violent one. If youdon’t make that response, you continually relive the unresolved situation over and over inyour life.” (b. 1925, U.S. author. Novelists in Interview (ed. by John Haffenden, 1985)).The scariest account of domestic violence occurs when you do not have to see a scar tofeel one. It’s like a thief in the night, because we don’t think about it until it indirectly ordirectly affects us on a personal level. There are many cases that have unknown causesand probably as many that go unreported. It’s a time bomb waiting to explode, and we willshow the impact of the explosion by reviewing 1994 and 1995 domestic violence data.Our source was provided through the publication, The Statistical Crime Data for the Stateof Maryland. By using the chi-squared test, it will demonstrate if there is a significant orinsignificant trend.CONCLUSION
  22. 22. As the data shows, domestic violence in the State of Maryland for 1994 and 1995indicates it is on the rise. We must all take steps to neutralize this time bomb. Becauseeverybody is a victim as long as the abuse continues. In addition, everyone must begin totake an active and responsible role to curve this silent offense. As long as we continue toallow these abuses to perpetuate, we are threatening our own futures. If the trendcontinues to rise as it has been reported in 1994 and 1995, our children’s behaviors maygrow more vicious in nature.

×