Industrial China in 2013 and Graphite's role - Simon Moores

1,331 views
1,120 views

Published on

A look at the macro-drivers of the Chinese economy and the role graphite plays. A focus on how the government have restricted mining and minerals activities in the past and whether the same is on the horizon for flake and amorphous graphite supply.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,331
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
64
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Industrial China in 2013 and Graphite's role - Simon Moores

  1. 1. Industrial China in 2013 and graphite’s role China Graphite Field Trip & Briefing 2013 Simon Moores, Manager, Industrial Minerals Data – smoores@indmin.com indmin.com/Data   
  2. 2. 1. China’s main drivers 2. Macro changes to mining in China   3. Flake‐graphite changes in China  4. The future 
  3. 3. Shanghai 1990s
  4. 4. Shanghai 2010s
  5. 5. • Growth <8% = norm  • China still a huge country in the midst of  industrialisation • Net mineral consumer through major  industry:   • Steel  • Metals production (aluminium, copper, lead,  zinc) • Fertilizer  • Drivers  • Infrastructure (Real estate, rail, roads,  airports)  • Cars • Crop production  • All underpinned by population growth and  urbanisation (rise of the middle class)   1. China’s main drivers | Economy and mineral demand  GDP growth of major economies 2012‐2017 
  6. 6. China’s minerals demand forecast (indexed to 2012) Graphite  Graphite  1. China’s main drivers
  7. 7. 1. China’s main drivers China is now an importer of raw materials  • 2000 average import dependency:  15%  • 2011 average important dependency:  40%   0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Bauxite Copper Iron ore Coking coal Average 2000 2011 China’s dependency on imported raw materials Note: China is a net exporter of natural graphite 
  8. 8. 2. Macro changes to mining in China   Resource management  • Environmental reasons commonly given  • But…China no longer wants to be the bread basket for the rest of the world • Exports of raw materials at the expense of resources/environment no longer a  viable long term business • The rare earths excuse  
  9. 9. Pollution controls • Blanket ban on all round/downdraft kilns, Shanxi  • Heavily polluting, inefficient • Had to covert rotary kilns or go bust  • 75% of producers wiped out overnight  • Prices up 70%  2007 – Refractory‐grade bauxite  2009 – Flake Graphite, Inner Mongolia   2011 – Amorphous Graphite, Hunan  • Mine closures of older operations  • Pollution and demand grounds   • Government‐forced consolidation in  Lutang • Coal and amorphous graphite industries • 220 mines to 30 on pollution and  resource protection  grounds   2. Macro changes to mining in China   2012 – Flake Graphite, Jixi, Heilongjiang 
  10. 10. 2. Macro changes to mining in China   Developing a value‐added economy • Exports of raw materials at the expense of resources/environment no longer  viable • Development of the production value‐chain is critical The 7 key industries China wants to develop  1. New energy 2. New energy automotive 3. New materials 4. Energy saving and environmental protection 5. Biological science 6. New information industry 7. High‐end equipment manufacturing 
  11. 11. 2. Macro changes to mining in China   High quality, lower cost manufacturing  Consolidation – majority of production by the fewest companies China wants to compete on quality and quantity   Output of top ten steel producers ‐ % of total capacity 
  12. 12. 2. Macro changes to mining in China   Cost of mining in China is rising In the last 10 years:  • Total costs up 800% for fluorspar • Average wages up 250%  • Industrial machinery sales up 300% between 2006 and 2011 • Government crackdown on inefficient mining and processing practices • Forced replacement of low cost labour  100 120 140 160 180 200 220 240 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Wages Land Coal, Oil, Electricity Yuan Source: China  Economic Information  Network, Bloomberg,  The People’s Bank of  China, China Economic  Information  Rising costs in China (% indexed to 2004)
  13. 13. 3. Flake graphite changes in China  • Graphite now on the national radar • Amorphous graphite consolidation in Hunan 2010‐2011  • Capped capacity at 510,000 tpa • Real output in 2012: 250,000 tpa • 220 mines down to 20‐30   • In essence it was a coal consolidation • Graphite listed as a strategic mineral in China  • Questions over how serious the government is at reform = larger mineral  industries than graphite 
  14. 14. 3. Flake graphite changes in China  Policy changes in Shandong 
  15. 15. 3. Flake graphite changes in China  Policy changes in Shandong  • Formal notice service to Pingdu & Laixi on 30 October 2012  • Ban on any new graphite processing plants • Environmental reasons = polluting of Pingtang River  • Environmental approval for every plant must be saught, those that fall foul will  have to cease operation  Real regulation or rhetoric? Relocation of plants to Heilongjiang? Nanshu Graphite plant, Shandong
  16. 16. 3. Flake graphite changes in China  Reserve challenges – Heilongjiang vs Shandong  Shandong • Capacity: 160,000 tpa • Operating rate: 43%  • Oldest flake graphite mines in China • Extraction is deeper and becoming  more expensive • Processing plants importing  more raw material from  Heilongjiang
  17. 17. 3. Flake graphite changes in China  Reserve challenges – Heilongjiang vs Shandong  Heilongjiang • Capacity: 280,000 tpa • Operating rate: 60% • China’s largest flake graphite producing province  • Largest resources in Asia – Luobei and Jixi   • Produces spherical  graphite  • Establishing graphite  industrial zones 
  18. 18. 3. Flake graphite changes in China  Reserve challenges – Luobei and Jixi  Luobei • North‐east, on border with Russia  • 636m. tonnes resources in 9km2 area  • 1/3rd of China’s graphite resources Jixi  • 800m. Tonnes resources  • Mines in Jixi suspended by government in  mid‐2012   Rich resources of both Luobei and Jixi very  attractive to large Chinese corporations 
  19. 19. 3. Flake graphite changes in China  The need for structural change • Graphite is an old mining industry in China (“Black gold”) • Structured in the 1980s  • Little widespread change in mining and processing has taken place since Phosphate – case study • 10m. tonnes over-capacity (total: 23m. tpa) • Many smaller miners, very few major players = graphite • In 2012, the government started a consolidation program by nominating preferred producers • Free loans to buy out smaller competitors • Revoking of mining licences of troublesome smaller players
  20. 20. 3. Flake graphite changes in China  Establishing centres of hi‐tech development  Inner Mongolia • Consolidation program started in 2010 • Rising New Energy the preferred producer (owns all mining licences) • Centralised graphite processing hubs  • Advanced, value‐added materials • High purity, spherical, expandable, foil  Rising New Energy’s 1902 acre graphite industrial park  18 February 2013, indmin.com  
  21. 21. 4. The medium term future for China  • In need of modernisation  • Increased focus on more efficient graphite mining  • Consolidation will happen  • High potential for export supply restrictions in favour of value‐added products  • Net exporter of graphite for foreseeable future  • Steady, cheap supply of graphite concentrate from China is over  • China is industry leading with commercial spherical graphite  • China will compete in other advanced battery materials 
  22. 22. 15 March 2013, Indonesia  • 3rd fastest growing economy in Asia • Ban includes: bauxite, limestone, quartz, zeolite, feldspar, iron ore “Ban will be strict with no exceptions”  Thamrin Latuconsina, Director of Export of Industrial and Mining  Products from the Ministry of Trade, Indonesia 
  23. 23. January 2013, Shenzen BYD delivers first batch of fully electric police cars to Shenzen Police Dept.  

×