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  • 1. English for Progress online ReportContentsPurpose of the report ...............................................................................................................................................2Aims and objectives of EfPonline ............................................................................................................................ 2Evaluation ................................................................................................................................................................ 2Delivery platform ...................................................................................................................................................... 3Promotion ................................................................................................................................................................ 3EfPonline main features...........................................................................................................................................4 Landing page ....................................................................................................................................................... 4 Session pages...................................................................................................................................................... 4 Live streaming ...................................................................................................................................................... 4 Recordings ........................................................................................................................................................... 4 Blogs ....................................................................................................................................................................4 Interviews ............................................................................................................................................................. 4 Photos ..................................................................................................................................................................4 Twitter ..................................................................................................................................................................5Audience engagement .............................................................................................................................................6Internet coverage .....................................................................................................................................................7Budget .....................................................................................................................................................................7Summary of web statistics .......................................................................................................................................8Breakdown of web statistics ....................................................................................................................................8 Web pages ........................................................................................................................................................... 8 Live streaming ....................................................................................................................................................10 YouTube ............................................................................................................................................................. 10 Blogs ..................................................................................................................................................................11Appendix 1: EfPonline ‘e-vite’ ................................................................................................................................ 13Report authorStephen Jennerstephen.jenner@in.britishcouncil.org14 December 2009
  • 2. English for Progress online ReportPurpose of the reportThis report aims to present an overview and evaluation of ‘English for Progress online’ (EfPonline), which wasdeveloped to run alongside the Third Policy Dialogue, Delhi 18-20 November 2009. The site is available atwww.britishcouncil.org.in/EfPonline. The content of the report may be of interest to any organization intending torun an online ELT event, and especially to BC offices worldwide looking to develop a delivery platform.Aims and objectives of EfPonlineEfPonline aimed to bring the discussions at the Third Policy Dialogue to a wider audience in India and Sri Lankaand worldwide. It was assumed that discussions on teacher education and training, English in the corporatesector, and the launch of David Graddol’s new research ‘English Next India’ would attract an internationalaudience in addition to engaging with the Project English audience in India and Sri Lanka.The objectives for the online event were to:1. Engage with remote audiences (see target audiences below).2. Create a permanent record of conference proceedings.3. Demonstrate the BC’s ability to use ICT tools effectively.4. Promote the launch of English Next India.Specific target audiences were identified:1. T1 and T2 contacts in the corporate and state education sectors not present at the conference.2. T3 teachers, corporate trainers, learners, i.e. the ‘recipients’ of policy decisions.3. ELT contacts and stakeholders in the UK and internationally.4. BC staff worldwide, especially those involved in ELT activities.5. Conference participants themselves.EvaluationNo specific targets were identified for web hits and unique users because there was no comparable event tobenchmark EfPonline against. Rather, it was hoped that the quantity and quality of content generated wouldshow this to be successful and worthwhile initiative.The main successes of EfPonline were: The majority of content (recordings, interviews and photos) were all uploaded during the two day event itself The delivery platform proved to be an effective way to reach our target audiences, was easy to manage and inexpensive The event was very interactive, with remote audiences able to take part in conference discussions via the blog and film comments page Content generated by the blogs was of very high quality and succeeded in drawing in a range of T1 to T3 contacts The BC was seen by conference delegates and the remote audience as effectively using ICT The event contributed to the highest ever recorded web traffic for BC IndiaThe main learning point is that the online event took a lot of the time of managers who during the event were notable to devote sufficient time to the physical conference. Time management during the event would need to beplanned well if we run a similar online conference in the future. 2 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 3. English for Progress online ReportDelivery platformA combination of three types of delivery platform was used:1. BC India web site to host the EfPonline landing page.2. Existing BC India accounts with Wordpress, YouTube and Picassa to host blogs, videos and photos.3. Specially designed web pages to host session pages and film pages.The use of this combination had several advantages:1. Using the BC India site allowed us to draw in traffic to the overall site and easily link to Project English and the Third Policy Dialogue pages.2. Using existing BC accounts with Wordpress, YouTube and Picassa had the potential to draw traffic to other BC projects (e.g. Low Carbon Futures) which also have accounts. The use of established web 2.0 tools opens up the content of EfPonline to a much wider audience. These tools are also user friendly (for the uploader as well as for the downloader) and easy to access.3. Commissioning the design of special pages for sessions and films allowed us to introduce functionality which is not available to the BC with its Obtree web content management system.The customer journey was considered very carefully. A viewer took four steps in order to view a film:1. EfPonline landing page to access the conference programme2. Click on the desired session on the conference programme3. Read the abstract, speaker bio/s, presentation/s and click on a link to watch the film4. The film page shows the live stream or recording with a ‘live’ comments boxPromotionPromoting EfPonline before the actual event was critical to its success. The aim was to build up a ‘critical mass’of viewers who were interacting online and promoting the event before it started. This was achieved through theblog and Twitter; blog discussions on conference themes were started two weeks before the event andsucceeded in drawing in a large audience. One blog discussion on ‘Which variety of English should be taught?’generated nearly 50 comments before the conference from bloggers worldwide. The EfPonline Twitter accountattracted over 30 followers before the event, which meant that conference tweets were reaching many moreTwitterers as a result of ‘re-tweets’ (when a follower sends your update to all their followers).The name ‘Efponline’ was chosen for the online event to give consistency and allow easy web searching. Thename formed part of the url of all web pages and the tag #efponline was used in the blogs and Twitter.EfPonline was promoted to the target audience via postings on the Talking English newsletter, ELTeCS, abanner on the British Council home page, the home pages of India and Sri Lanka sites, and on the home pageof Teaching English. A specially designed ‘e-vite’ (see Appendix 1) was sent via email to: All invited delegates and speakers BC internal mailing lists (MM forum, TechTeach, YL Forum, TT Forum) NASSCOM members All staff India and Sri Lanka UK based E&E senior management and Communications UK ELT contacts 3 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 4. English for Progress online ReportEfPonline main featuresLanding pagewww.britishcouncil.org.in/efponlineThe landing page gave an introduction to the event and links to all the main features.Session pageswww.britishcouncil.org/india-projects-english-tpdschedule.htmA conference programme page was created where the user could click on the session page they wanted toview. The session pages contained the title and day/time of the session, the abstract, speaker’s bio and photoand presentation for download. There was also a link to the live stream or recording.Live streamingAn external vendor, 24 Frames Digital based in Mumbai, was chosen to deliver live web streams. 9 sessionswere streamed over 2 days, to very high quality. Two download speeds were available. After each session thestream was converted into a recording for upload. One fixed camera was used in order to keep costs down. Thismeant that the viewer was only able to see the stage (as the camera was not able to pan the room).RecordingsIn addition to the live streams that were converted into recordings, 6 parallel sessions were also recorded anduploaded to the site, using a professional film crew. The recordings were played using Vimeo player, which is afree third party plug-in video player. Both the live stream and recording film pages had a comments box, whereusers could add their comments on the session. The comments were updated in real time (after moderation)and archived so that each user could view all the comments that had been made, whether viewing the livestream or recording.Blogshttp://britishcouncilindia.wordpress.com/The BC India Wordpress account was used to set up an ‘English for Progress online’ blog. An internal bloggingteam (Senior Training Consultants based in Chennai and Colombo) were asked to post on topics relevant to theconference and engage in discussion. To date the EfPonline blog has generated 51 posts and 201 comments.Interviewswww.youtube.com/user/BritishcouncilindiaA film crew was engaged to conduct formal, sit down interviews with key contacts during the conference. Inaddition, roving interviewers used Flip HD video recorders to capture ‘on the spot’ interviews with delegates andspeakers. Chetan Bhagat’s evening address was also filmed and uploaded. 29 films were uploaded.Photoshttp://picasaweb.google.com/BritishCouncilIndiaAn official photographer captured images during the conference, in order to give a flavour of the event to theremote audience. 94 photos were uploaded to the British Council Picassa account during the conference. 4 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 5. English for Progress online ReportTwitterhttp://twitter.com/efponlineTwitter is a social networking application which allows the user to create an account and update their own homepage with a single ‘Tweet’ or message of 140 characters or less. Users can ‘follow’ other users, which meansthey also see the updates of the people they follow on their home page. The activity of following and beingfollowed is what makes Twitter a powerful networking tool, because it is possible to build a personal networkvery quickly and easily and find new contacts. The use of tags (a user inserts a hash tag before a key word inthe tweet) has turned Twitter into a very effective search engine; it is possible to search for key words insideTwitter and so find new discussions and contacts in a chosen field. Twitter currently has over 1 million usersworldwide. A 2008 Harvard report estimated that 10% of Twitterers post 90% of Tweets, implying that theapplication is used by core groups. There are many specialist networks using Twitter, e.g. ELT groups, who postupdates about conferences, new research/practice and discussions.For EfPonline Twitter was used to:1. Promote EfPonline before the event by sending updates of new content uploaded to the web site and building an audience of followers.2. Cover the conference while it was taking place by sending tweets of the content of session content. This is called ‘micro blogging’ and effectively allows users to follow the proceedings of a conference remotely in real time.3. Announce when live streams were about the take place. In fact, Twitter was the only tool available which could make announcements over the web in real time.To date the EfPonline Twitter account has attracted 37 followers (including 2 Twitter ELT ‘lists’) and 67 tweetshave been sent. The tag #efponline was used on all tweets. The ‘Tweetcloud’ below shows all the keywords onTwitter grouped around this tag.The most interesting fact about the Twitter account is that it was the second biggest referrer, after the EfPonlinelanding page. This shows the huge potential of Twitter as a marketing tool. 5 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 6. English for Progress online ReportAudience engagementEngagement with target audiences (defined on p.2) can be measured in two ways:1. People who joined the discussion on the blog Name Organisation Designation/job Location George Pickering N/A ELT Consultant UK Manish Sabarwal Teamlease CEO and Founder Delhi Sarita Manuja RBI Director Punjab Amol Padwad N/A Editor ELTeCS ISL India David Graddol The English Company Freelance writer UK Shefali Kulkarni N/A Freelance trainer Kerala K Chattopadhyay Bankim Sardar College Sr Lecturer in English West Bengal Nishant Lohagun JNU Student Delhi K S Manojkumar Trainer and founder Academy of English Language Pune Uma Raman HCL Technologies DGM Skills Enhancement Chennai G. H.Asoka Project Leader Bilingual Ed National Institute of Education Sri Lanka Shefali Bakshi Amity School of Languages Deputy Director Lucknow Anamika Basu Genpact Training Manager Hyderabad Carmen Rhor Universidad S.Ignacio De Loyola Part time teacher Peru Anupma Diddi Young Learners Academy Course Director Mumbai Susan Hillyard N/A Teacher trainer, materials writer Argentina2. The comments people left on the blog and film pages“It’s really a fantastic initiative to have a virtual event alongside the actual one. This will expand the reach of theevent tremendously and may allow the participation of much larger section of concerned people.”Amol PadwadA very good initiative by the British Council to hold a dialogue and deliberate on such important issues ofLanguage. We talk about Indian Council for languages but one needs to take the initiative and start somethingof this kind. Kudos to BC and thanks to them in making me a part of such a wonderful event.Shefali Bakshireally cool! the live streamimg was awesome.. very clear, very less buffering.. loved the panel discussion onmultilingualism.Sarita ManujaThanks very much to British Council for providing the live streams. I tuned in to watch some of the live streams.It was very interesting and informative. Congratulations to all the presenters. All did splendidly well.Anooja NairThank you all so much for making my presence possible even though I’m so far away. The joy of technologyand the willingness of people to share and discuss openly!Susan Hilyard 6 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 7. English for Progress online ReportInternet coverageSome web sites picked up the content of EfPonline and re-produced it on specially created pages on their sites:Webinar Newswww.webinarreviews.org/webcast-english-for-progress-online/ELT World Newswww.eltworld.net/news/2009/07/india-english-for-progress/Nagpur Universityhttp://nagpuruniversity.blogspot.com/2009/07/learn-english-english-for-progress.htmlBilingual Education Platformhttp://bilingualeduc.ning.com/events/english-for-progress-thirdELT Worldwww.eltworld.net/2009/07/india-english-for-progress/Budget Activity INR GBP* Webcaster (2 days) 215,085 2,801 Internet lines at Hyatt 94,200 1,227 Web page design 25,000 326 Film crew 80,000 1,042 Rent of 2 Reliance dongles 2400 31 Test stream equipment + crew 20,000 260 Total 436,685 5,686*BKR = 76.8 7 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 8. English for Progress online ReportSummary of web statisticsArea Unique users Page views Posts Comments FollowersLive stream videos 192 - 19 Nov 377 - 19 Nov N/A 19 N/A 233 - 20 Nov 464 - 20 NovAll web pages No information 11,099 N/A N/A N/A availableBlog N/A 3,677 51 201 N/AYouTube N/A 1,160 N/A N/A N/ATwitter N/A N/A N/A N/A 37All stats are to date figures.Unique users are defined as a single IP address.Page views are the total number of times a page is visited.Stats for other projects/events using the BC blog have been removed.Breakdown of web statisticsWeb pages Page Visits Views English for Progress online - Landing page 1788 2205 http://www.britishcouncil.org/india-english-efp-online English for Progress online - Programme Schedule 1247 1819 http://www.britishcouncil.org/india-projects-english-tpdschedule English Next India: Policy Implications 731 893 http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/19_1.html Web Casting 671 1123 http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/webcasting/Vimeomain.asp Inauguration and Introduction to ENI 410 530 http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/18.html Rozgar Project: British Council India 303 1046 http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/ sessions/19_3.html 8 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 9. English for Progress online ReportManaging a Silent Revolution 252 402http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20_4.htmlTransforming the Workforce for 2020 Part 1 206 275http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/19_2_1.htmlThe Future of English Language Education: Methodological choices 204 340http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20_3.htmlBringing India s National Curriculum Framework to Life 187 272http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20_2_3.htmlTransforming the Workforce for 2020 Part 2 173 224http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/19_2_2.htmlMeeting the recruitment challenge 169 231http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/19_4_3.htmlContinuous Professional Development 163 234http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20_2_1.htmlIn-service and pre-service English Language Teacher Education 140 207http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20_2_2.htmlTesting Language Proficiency: Models for Indian Higher Education Sector 127 189http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20_5_1.htmlEducation for All 124 185http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20_5_2.htmlRecommendations and conclusions emerging from the first day 117 156http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/19_5.htmlFrom planning for change to seeing intended change in practice 112 146http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20_1.htmlEnglish Next India: Policy Implications for English Teaching 107 135http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20.htmlEffective Partnership in Examination Policy Reform Projects 105 148http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/19_4_2.htmlThe Role of English in Conflict Transformation 104 140http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20_5_3.htmlInternational qualifications for students as an incentive 99 150http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/19_4_1.htmlThe Way Forward 46 49http://www.britishcouncil.org.in/efponline/sessions/20_6.htmlTotals 7585 11099 9 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 10. English for Progress online ReportLive streamingThese web logs from the webcaster show the stats for the live streams on both days of the conference. Event Date: 19/11/2009 Event Date: 20/11/2009 For Low Speed: 100Kbps For Low Speed: 100Kbps Hits: 255 Hits: 255 Visitors: 129 Visitors: 116 Cities: 10 Cities: 11 Data Transfer: 1.64GB Data Transfer: 1.42GB Countries: 4 Countries: 6 Event Date: 19/11/2009 Event Date: 20/11/2009 For High Speed: 250Kbps For High Speed: 250Kbps Hits: 122 Hits: 209 Visitors: 63 Visitors: 117 Cities: 8 Cities: 8 Data Transfer: 1.82GB Data Transfer: 3.78GB Countries: 6 Countries: 7YouTubeA total of 29 films were uploaded (some films were split up due to the 10 min limit on a single YouTube film).League table of page views (above 10) shows:Film Views Film ViewsChetan Bhagat 239 Stephen Jenner 17Nandan Nilekani 212 Som Mittal 15Delhi DoE 184 Rod Bolitho 14Jill Coates 53 Julian Parry 14Martin Davidson 51 George Pickering 16Delhi school children 40 Dinali Fernando 13Alison Barrett 34 Nirupa Fernandez 10Chris Gibson 33 Maya Menon 8Philippa Mathewson 29 Prof Abhai Maurya 4David Graddol 28 Nirupa Fernandez 10 10 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 11. English for Progress online ReportBlogsWordpress allows the admin user to gain a wealth of information into blog use:1. Over 3000 page views were recorded. The busiest day was 20 Nov (day 2 of the conference) with 348 views.This chart shows the number of views over three months since the BC blog was set up. The sharp increase inviews for Nov shows how much traffic was generated for the BC blog by English for Progress online.2. Referrals occur when someone clicks through to your site (in this case the blog) from a link. The chart belowshows the top referrers above 5 clicks. Not surprisingly most users clicked through from the EfPonline landingpage. More surprising is that Twitter was the second highest referrer (when 3 entries are put together). 11 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 12. English for Progress online Report3. This chart shows the top posts by page view (above 20 views). The first topic on varieties of English wasclearly a topic that caught the imagination of bloggers. 12 © The British Council, India 2009
  • 13. English for Progress online ReportAppendix 1: EfPonline ‘e-vite’ 13 © The British Council, India 2009