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Neuro shopping - The Next Step in Mystery Shopping
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Neuro shopping - The Next Step in Mystery Shopping

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Mystery Shopping has been stuck in time, along with a lot of Customer Service research. …

Mystery Shopping has been stuck in time, along with a lot of Customer Service research.

These disciplines must ask themselves a key question "Are we asking the right questions?"

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Transcript

  • 1. Reading your customers’ minds Are we asking the right questions?
  • 2. Silent movies were cool But we don’t watch them anymore. The Customer Service industry is stuck in the silent film age.
  • 3. We see it differently As a Mystery Shopping company we are obsessed with getting to the truth, not just asking what has always been asked. But the biggest question is this: “Are we asking the right questions?”
  • 4. The world has changed We know Customers now have a voice, and a choice.
  • 5. But their voices are not being heard Although you are listening as hard as you can.
  • 6. Customers are not heard because Customers Lie. Staff lie. It happens either intentionally or unintentionally. Ask a customer why they left a Brand, and usually they can’t pin point the exact reason. Yet decisions are made on their inaccurate feedback.
  • 7. So what are the right questions? What should you ask customers? What should you measure? We’ll help you read your customers’ minds. Then MEASURE and make CHANGES.
  • 8. Don’t ask the same bland questions. • Was the staff member wearing a name badge? • Did they repeat back your order? • Did they take an interest in your enquiry? • Were you satisfied? • Would you refer to a friend?
  • 9. Your view of service is different • Whether you are buying a pizza or a home loan, you buy different to others – and expect different things. • Not all customers like to be served the same. • Not all staff expect to serve the same. • Not all Brands are the same.
  • 10. We start from the beginning. • How do people buy, and who buys how? • People buy sub- consciously, then rationalize in the conscious mind. • E.g. buying a car
  • 11. The sub-conscious defines • What people do • Context • Unmet emotional needs • Emotional appeal • Communication styles
  • 12. The conscious defines • What people say • Content • Rational features • Rational appeal • Communication styles
  • 13. Neuroscience of consumers • Emotions are a significant driver of decision making and purchase behaviour. • Especially true if: – the decision is based on biological and social needs including food, safety, inclusion and financial security. – the decision maker is under stress. – rational features are similar. • Furthermore, the “value” is largely driven by emotional core beliefs. • Customer value propositions and staff behaviours need to address both explicit rational needs and implicit emotional needs.
  • 14. Step 1 - Segment We profile our shoppers into Neuro-segments based on their sub- conscious buying biases (Core beliefs)
  • 15. Step 2 - Profile • We profile those shoppers who are also your customers. • Match your brand users to their core purchase behaviors. • Do they want Speed? Dependability? Process? Conversation? Data? Trust? You can’t do it all.
  • 16. Detailed example - Banking
  • 17. Mapping emotional drivers to brand • Foundational research over the last 18 months has provided a sufficiently large database to allow deep dives into the core belief segments and map them onto the positioning canvas. • This helps identify market growth and training opportunities. • In this example, the client’s brand (red dotted line) appealed to the Loyal Skeptic and Helper segments, and the easiest adjacent segment to attract was the Peacemakers.
  • 18. Step 3 – Design questionnaires • Determine the right questions for the right customers, and ask the questions. • Questions will match the attributes being sought by your customers. • Now you can ensure the right questions are asked in Mystery Shopping and Customer Surveys.
  • 19. Mystery Shopping • We are looking for behaviours which can be measured by anyone, regardless of their profile. • Clients can then focus the training and operations on those core customer service traits and behaviours.
  • 20. “I’m not sure that applies to us” • We’ve seen applications from car repair shops, to Banks through to Department Stores. • Every brand attracts a certain type of buyer looking for certain types of behaviours; even (especially) in hyper price competitive markets.
  • 21. Get this right to predict sales Getting this right allows you to predict sales based on Mystery Shopping scores. E.g. increase Mystery Shop scores x% and increase sales by y%
  • 22. How to connect Contacts: Steven Di Pietro sdipietro@serviceintegrity.com.au +61405478452 Felecia Bramble fbramble@serviceintegrity.com.a u +61431484574

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