Advanced Club Leadership Training 2011 Session Plan
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Advanced Club Leadership Training 2011 Session Plan

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A session plan developed for Advanced Club Leadership Training for District 70 Toastmasters 2011 Club Officer Training. ...

A session plan developed for Advanced Club Leadership Training for District 70 Toastmasters 2011 Club Officer Training.

Some of the sessions include:

The effects of Club Culture
Communication Across Generations
Enhancing Leadership Skills by building a more dynamic Toastmasters Club

The main aim of this document is to guide the 25+ club officer trainers in delivering their individual sessions and so that a greater level of constancy and professionalism would be achieved in the training.

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Advanced Club Leadership Training 2011 Session Plan Advanced Club Leadership Training 2011 Session Plan Presentation Transcript

  •   District 70 Toastmasters 2011 Advanced Club Leadership Training Session Plans Version 1.0
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  1       Important  Note:    Please  read.   This  training  has  been  designed  to  be  delivered  in  3  hours  -­‐  with  2.5  hours  of  training  and  1/2  hour  for  a  break.    There  are  five   topics,  each  of  30  minutes  duration.    To  allow  the  greatest  flexibility  we  have  separated  the  topics  into  3  core  topics  that  must   be  trained,  and  2  optional  topics  which  should  be  trained  but  can  be  left  out  if  you  are  running  over  time.    If  you  choose  to   leave  out  a  topic  you  can  choose  to  leave  out  both  or  either  one  of  the  optional  topics  as  suits  your  needs  and  preference.   Using  this  Session  Plan   Use  this  plan  to  guide  you  though  the  training  session  in  a  step  by  step  manner.     Have  plan  printed  out  and  use  as  notes  during  the  session.  It  would  be  best  if  you  are  familiar  with  them  material  before  the   training  session.   Type  of  training  activities   Lecture:  You  talk,  they  listen.  Each  lecture  should  last  no  more  than  5  minutes.  Be  familiar  with  the  PowerPoint  presentation   and  use  it  as  a  mnemonic  device  to  assist  your  delivery.   Discussion:  Usually  starts  with  you  asking  a  question  to  the  audience  and  eliciting  responses.  Facilitate  the  discussion  so  that   several  people  respond.  Sometimes  you  may  want  to  write  the  answers  down  on  a  whiteboard  or  flip-­‐chart.  Some  group   discussions  are  open-­‐ended  and  are  used  to  simply  contextualise  knowledge  and  allows  learners  to  hear  other  peoples  points   of  view.  Other  discussions  my  have  a  focused  conclusion  that  you  will  have  to  guide  the  group  towards  these  are  know  as  a   guided  discussion.   Buzz  Group:  A  large  group  is  broken  into  a  number  of  small  groups  so  that  they  can  discuss  the  subject  at  hand.   Activities:  Several  activities  are  included  which  usually  conducted  by  the  learners  in  quick  time  and  with  some  minor   discussion  between  people.  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  2     The  Past  Six  Months:  My  Leadership  Experience  (Core  Session)  30  Minutes   Quote  (1  minute)   “A  leader  is  one  who  knows  the  way,  goes  the  way,  and  shows  the  way”     John  Maxwell,  Leadership  Expert   Introduction  (2  minutes)   The  purpose  of  this  session  is  to  a)  review  our  goals  and  objectives  and  to  look  at  the  decisions  we  have  made  in  the  past  6   months,  and  b)  determine  what  actions  are  required  to  be  ensure  a  successful  and  productive  second  half  of  the  toastmasters   year.   Trainers  note:    Much  of  this  session  can  be  packaged  up  in  the  metaphor  of  a  trip  or  journey,  travelling  from  point  A  to  B  with  a  course   correction  along  the  way.    Trainers  are  encouraged  to  pick  whatever  journey  metaphor  they  are  most  comfortable  with.    Examples   include:  hiking,  bushwalking,  travelling  on  a  ship  or  boat,  flying  in  a  airplane,  travelling  to  the  moon.    The  key  points  for  the  metaphor   are  that  we  have  a  start  point,  an  end  point,  a  course  correction,  and  that  it  is  possible  to  lose  your  way,  or  get  side-­tracked  (by  a   storm,  asteroid  shower,  picnic,  etc).   Lecture:     Start  off  with  the  opening  metaphor  and  explain  the  purpose  of  this  session,  which  is  to;  a)  review  our  original   goals/expectations  when  we  started  the  year,  b)  see  how  we  are  progressing,  and  c)  determine  if  any  corrective  actions  are   required  on  our  part:  to  ensure  that  we  end  the  Toastmasters  year  having  achieved  the  goals  we  set  out  with.      
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  3     Briefly  introduce  the  three  focus  questions:     Where  am  I?  (Where  am  I  along  my  journey?)   Where  do  I  want  to  be?  (What  is  my  destination?)   How  do  I  get  there?  (What  to  I  need  to  have,  be,  or  do  to  achieve  my  goals)   Where  am  I  now?  (10  minutes)   Activity:   Have  learners  complete  the  5  reflection  questions  in  their  workbook.       They  have  one  minute  for  each  question.       1.   What  are  my  greatest  achievements?   2.   What  are  my  biggest  challenges…  and  what  have  I  learnt  from  them?   3.   What  have  I  learnt  about  myself  in  the  last  6  months?   4.   Do  I  feel  like  a  valuable  &  contributing  member  of  the  executive  team?   5.   What  will  people  say  about  me  at  the  end  of  my  club  officer  year?       Note:    Encourage  learners  to  respond  in  ways  that  are  inner  focused.    For  example  rather  than  saying  that  'My  biggest  challenge  is   that  Billy  is  a  arrogant  so-­an-­so'  it  is  better  to  say  that  "I  find  it  challenging  to  deal  with  arrogant  people".    The  reason  for  this  is   because  it  is  most  likely  not  possible  for  us  to  change  Billy's  behaviour,  but  we  certainly  can  change  our  reaction  to  it.   End  the  activity  by  having  a  sampling  of  people  share  their  answers  with  the  audience.      (5  minutes)  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  4   Note:  The  learners  can  either  state  their  answers  to  all  five  questions  or  lead  the  group  to  respond  one  question  at  a  time.  i.e.  say  two   people  to  tell  us  their  answer  to  Question  1,  then  another  two  people  to  state  their  answer  to  Question  2.  etc.  Be  careful  of  the  time  that   a  session  like  that  can  absorb.    It  will  possible  be  best  go  with  the  first  option  and  have  three  people  read  through  all  their  answers.    An   extra  point  of  learning  here  is  that  it  is  likely  that  the  challenges  will  be  somewhat  universal  or  common  to  other  people.    You  can  say   something  like  "Oh  yeah,  I'm  sure  that  we  can  all  relate  to  that  issue."   Where  do  I  want  to  be  (5  minutes)     Explain  that  the  intention  is  for  learners  to  reflect  on  their  expectations  when  they  took  on  their   club  officer  roll  six  months  ago  and  their  progress  thus  far.  Ask  them  to  consider  if  they  are  on   target  to  fulfilling  their  expectations.  Do  they  still  want  the  same  things  as  they  did  six  months  ago?     Do  they  want  something  different?    Have  them  consider  their  leadership  aspirations,  their  personal   growth,  their  educational  achievements,  and  their  leadership  skills.   Activity:   Have  the  learners  complete  the  question    "Where  do  I  want  to  be"  on  the  top  of  page  5  of  the   workbook.   How  do  I  get  there?  (10  minutes)   Lecture:  (2  minutes)     The  final  question  for  this  review  is,  "How  do  I  get  there?"    Learners  should  consider  their  final   destination  (Where  they  want  to  be)  and  answer  these  three  questions.    
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  5   What  do  I  need  to  Be,  Do,  and  Have  to  reach  my  destination?   What  do  I  need  to  be?  (What  personal  attributes  does  the  officer  need  to  work  on?    e.g.  Do  they  need  to  be  calmer,  more   assertive,  less  aggressive,  more  relaxed,  less  uptight,  more  forgiving,  more  outgoing,  etc.)   This  is  basically  a  function  of  personality  and  character,  inner  emotions,  and  feelings.     What  do  I  need  to  do?  (What  actions  does  the  officer  need  to  undertake?    e.g.  Plan  their  time  better,  get  the  agenda  out  on  time,   follow  up  with  someone,  form  a  committee,  ask  for  help,  etc.)   This  is  about  action  and  making  things  happen.     What  do  I  need  to  have?    (What  resources  does  the  officer  need  to  acquire?    e.g.  Increased  training,  more  information,  more   assistance,  better  supplies,  greater  autonomy,  etc).   These  are  the  external  resources  that  an  officer  may  need  to  help  them  do  their  job  better.     Activity:  (8  minutes)     Focusing  on  these  three  things  (be,  do  and  have)  ask  the  learners  to  complete  the  section  on  the  bottom  of  page  5  'How  do  I  get   there?'     Finish  off  by  asking  for  one  or  two  people  to  share  their  answers.   Questions  (1  minute)   Take  two  or  three  questions  from  the  learners  before  recapping  and  concluding  this  session  on  a   high  note.    
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  6   Summary  (1  minute)   In  this  session  we  have:     Reviewed  our  individual  progress  over  the  last  six  months  and  reflected  on  the  next  six   months  ahead  of  us  by  looking  at  the  3  key  questions:   Where  am  I?   Where  do  I  want  to  be?   How  do  I  get  there?   What's  the  next  step?  (1  minute)   1.    Continue  asking  these  questions.  Slide   2.    Take  action.  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  7   Club  Culture:  And  how  it  effects  my  club  (Core  Session)  (30  Minutes)   Quote  (1  minute)   “Who  you  are  speaks  so  loudly  I  can't  hear  what  you're  saying.”  Slide    Ralph  Waldo  Emerson,  American  Poet,  Lecturer  and  Essayist,  1803-­‐1882   Introduction   Note  to  Trainer:  This  is  a  30  to  45  minute  session  designed  to  help  clubs  and  club  officers  develop   understanding  and  awareness  of  the  cultural  characteristics  of  a  healthy  Toastmasters  club  and  inspire   and  motivate  them  to  work  more  towards  this  end.   Introduction  on  the  importance  of  setting  and  maintaining  quality  benchmarks  for  club  operation,   including  but  not  limited  to  the  basics  of  the  Quality  Club  Audit.    This  session  starts  off  with  several   reflective  questions,  then  has  a  short  lecture  on  'What  is  Club  Culture?"  and  then  end  with  an  activity   where  learners  look  at  the  own  clubs  culture  and  the  Quality  Club  Audit.   What  is  Club  Culture:  (5  to  10  Minutes)   Reflective  questions:       Start  off  by  introducing  the  topic  and  then  asking  the  learners  to  take  a  minute  or  two  to  think  about  and  answer  the  7   reflective  questions  on  the  top  of  page  6  of  the  workbook.    Ask  them  to  be  honest.  (Slide  and  workbook)  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  8     The  questions  are:     Are  your  club  members  enthusiastic?     Is  everybody  working  as  a  team  and  collaborating?    Are  there  any  free  riders?  (A  free  rider   is  a  person  who  does  not  do  their  fair  share,  for  example  a  club  member  who  doesn't  take   on  any  meeting  roles.)   Are  you  satisfied  with  your  clubs  performance?     Is  morale  in  your  club  high?     Are  members’  needs  being  met?     Are  members’  goals  being  achieved?   Is  our  membership  turnover  rate  acceptable?     Learners  should  answer  Yes  /  No  /  Don’t  know?  to  each  of  these  questions.     Suggest  that  regardless  of  how  they  answered  the  questions  that  club  culture  plays  a  major  part     Lecture:  Club  Culture:   Using  the  PowerPoint  slides  as  a  guide  talk  briefly  on  the  aspects  of  club  culture  listed  below.   What  is  Club  Culture?  Club  Culture  is  the  assumptions,  values,  norms,  and  tangible  signs   (artifacts)  of  an  organisation’s  members  and  their  behaviours.       For  example:    
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  9   Timing   Do  we  start  and  finish  on  time.    Do  we  tolerate  speeches  that   go  over  time?     Appropriateness  of  language   Do  people  in  our  clubs  swear  or  use  crude  language.    Do  we  tell   risqué  jokes  at  our  club.     Bias   Does   our   club   attract   any   particular   sort   of   member,   e.g.   all   one   age   group,   all   one   socio-­‐economic   group,   all   one   educational  level?     Speeches   Do  we  do  manual  speeches?     Dress   Do  we  wear  business  suits,  smart  casual,  casual  clothing  to  our   meetings             It  is  important  to  note  that  there  are  no  right  or  wrong  answers  here;  there  are  only  matters  of  fact.    Each  club  will  conduct  its   business  in  a  certain  way  that  will  lead  to  a  particular  culture.    Each  club  then  can  be  labelled  with  a  series  of  adjectives  that   could  be  used  to  describe  its  culture.    For  example  clubs  could  be  described  as:  Fun,  enjoyable,  friendly,  professional,  stuffy,   casual,  traditional,  blasé,  dedicated,  of-­‐a-­‐specific-­‐biased  (specifically  biased  to  service  the  needs  of  a  particular  group).     How  would  the  learners  label  their  own  club,  or  another  club  they  know?     How  is  club  culture  communicated?       Club  culture  is  communicated  by  the  things  we  do  and  say,  and  the  things  that  we  don't  do  and   don't  say.     For  each  of  these  things  there  can  be  positive  (good)  and  negative  (bad)  examples.  For  example:  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  10     Positive   Negative   The  things  we  do   Treating  others  with  respect.   Talking  during  other  people’s  speeches.   The  things  we  say   Using  educational  award  titles  when   introducing  someone.   (eg  John  Smith  CC).   Using  harsh  or  critical  language  during   an  evaluation.     The  things  we  don't  do   Not  laughing  when  someone  forgets   their  speech  during  a  ice  breaker.   Not  offering  words  of  encouragement  to   the  losers  of  a  speech  competition.     The  things  we  don't  say   Not  saying  how  boring  an  educational   session  was.   Not  asking  visitors  to  join  our  club.     It  is  clear  that  some  of  these  examples  are  universally  positive  and  negative.    For  example  treating  other  people  with  respect   should  always  be  a  clearly  established  norm  in  any  club  and  should  be  a  universal  rule.    Other  examples  however  may  not  be.     Consider  the  issue  of  using  educational  award  and  titles  after  a  person’s  name  (saying  DTM  for  example).    If  you  club  culture  is   professional  in  nature  then  it  may  be  expected  that  people  would  use  educational  titles,  to  not  do  so  would  be  rude.    If   however  your  club  is  more  casual  in  nature  then  using  titles  could  be  seen  as  being  somewhat  pretentious.       Can  you  think  of  other  examples?   Trainers  Note:    If  anyone  starts  to  argue  the  previous  point,  respond  by  saying  that  they  are  proving  your  point,  that  using  titles,  etc  is   simply  a  matter  of  preference,  but  these  sort  of  preferences  run  deep  with  people.     What  is  a  winning  culture?       "Where  everyone  in  the  team  is  committed  to  creating  a  performance  focused  environment  where   every  member  has  the  opportunity  to  grow  and  achieve."  Slide  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  11   How  do  we  know  if  we  have  a  winning  club  culture?       Regardless  of  how  we  might  describe  our  club  there  are  some  elements  that  all  clubs  should  have  in  common.    These  elements   are  based  on  the  questions  we  asked  at  the  beginning  of  this  session.       Are  your  club  members  enthusiastic?     Is  everybody  working  as  a  team  and  collaborating?    Are  there  any  free  riders?   Are  you  satisfied  with  your  clubs  performance?     Is  morale  in  your  club  high?     Are  members’  needs  being  met?     Are  members’  goals  being  achieved?   Is  our  membership  turnover  rate  acceptable?   If  every  member  of  your  executive  team,  indeed  if  every  member  of  your  club,    can  confidently  answer  yes  to  each  of  these   questions  then  you  have  a  winning  club  culture.    If  there  is  any  doubt  by  even  one  member  then  perhaps  your  club  culture   needs  an  overhaul.   Activity:    Reflection  using  the  Quality  Club  Audit.  (15  minutes)   Note:  This  activity  will  use  the  existing  District  70  quality  Club  Audit  to  lead  us  into  thinking  about  the  culture  of  our  club.    The  Quality   Club  Audit  is  itself  based  on  Toastmasters  International's  Moments  of  Truth  Educational  session  which  is  freely  available  from  the  TI   website.         Setup  the  activity     Introducing  the  Quality  Club  Audit  on  page  7  of  the  workbook.       Explain  that  we  are  not  going  to  do  a  quality  club  audit  and  that  we  are  not  interested  in  people  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  12   tallying  up  their  club  score  and  telling  us  how  wonderful  their  club  is!  (Authors  Note:    Just  in  case  you  missed  it,  there  is  a   sarcastic  tone  here.  In  the  past  I  have  seen  people  use  the  audit  to  misrepresent  their  club’s  achievements  and  shout  out  a  high   score.    That  is  not  the  point  of  the  audit;  at  least  it  should  not  be  the  point.)      We  want  to  use  the  audit  form  to  focus  our   attention  on  the  36  performance  standards  listed  and  then  think  about  and  answer  these  three  questions.     1.   What  are  we  doing  that  we  should  keep  doing?   2.   What  are  we  doing  that  we  should  stop  doing?   3.   What  are  we  not  doing  that  we  could  do  to  improve  club  performance?     The  questions  should  be  answered  honestly  and  frankly  and  should  be  aimed  at  exploring  what   elements  of  our  club  culture  help  or  hinder  our  clubs  performance.    Tell  them  that  a  club   representative  will  (in  45  seconds  or  less)  present  back  to  the  whole  group  afterwards.   Activity:   Have  the  learners  break  up  into  their  club  groups  and  discuss  the  three  questions  above.    Depending  on  the  logistics  of  your   room  and  how  many  people  you  have  you  may  want  to  lengthen  or  shorten  this  part  of  the  exercise  to  between  10  and  20   minutes,    remember  to  allow  time  for  the  following  debrief  session.  Slide  and  Workbook   Debrief:       Call  every  back  together  have  a  representative  from  each  club  report  to  the  group  what  their  club  came  up  with.    Be  strict  on   time  here  and  remind  people  to  only  talk  for  45  seconds.    Obviously  the  more  clubs  you  have  represented  in  the  room  the   longer  this  part  will  take.   Note:    Often  a  debrief  session  like  this  is  not  really  required  for  the  learning  to  occur  as  most  of  the  learning  happens  during  the   activity.    Having  said  that  many  learners  however  do  not  understand  this  and  will  feel  a  lack  of  completion  if  the  debrief  does  not   happen.    Also  often  many  good  ideas  can  come  up  during  the  debrief,  so  there  can  be  some  value  to  the  group  as  a  whole.      
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  13   Questions  (1  minute)   Take  two  or  three  questions  from  the  learners  before  recapping  and  concluding  this  session  on  a  high   note.      Note:  If  you  are  not  getting  any  responses  perhaps  you  can  ask  the  audience  “has  anyone  ever  though   about  their  club  culture  in  this  way  before?”,  “can  they  see  that  it  is  important?  “,  “can  they  see  how  it  can   affect  our  clubs  positively  or  negatively?”     Summary  (1  minute)   In  this  session  we  have  covered:     Club  Culture   What  is  club  culture,  and  how  is  it  communicated.   The  fact  that  there  is  not  right  or  wrong  club  culture   Club  culture  determines  the  things  we  do  and  say  and  don't  do  and  don't  say.   And  using  the  Quality  Club  Audit  we  looked  at  specific  actions  that  we  can  do  in  our  respective  clubs.  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  14     What's  the  next  step?  (1  minute)   Over  the  coming  weeks;       1.       Think  about  your  club's  culture.  What's  good,  what's  bad.  What  needs  to  change.   2.       Ask  you  members  if  they  are  happy  with  the  clubs  performance.   3.       Conduct  a  Quality  Club  Audit  or  a  Moments  of  Truth  session  at  you  next  executive   meeting.   4.       Focus  on  developing  a  winning  club.    
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  15   Enhancing  Club  Leadership  Skills:  The  Three  Pillars  (Core  Session)  (35  minutes)   Quote  (1  minute)   “The  difference  between  ordinary  and  extraordinary  is  that  little  extra.”    Slide   Jimmy  Johnson  quotes  (American  football  Coach  and  broadcaster"   Three  Pillars  for  Success  (Theory)  (10  Minutes)   Lecture:    Three  Pillars     Trainer  to  introduce  the  three  pillars  that  will  be  the  focus  of  this  session:   1.     Meetings  with  'zing'   2.     Processing  new  members  -­‐  Lance  Miller  Model   3.     Succession  Planning   Trainer  should  explain  that  these  three  focus  areas  were  selected  by  Senior  District  Officers  for  specific  attention  during  the   design  if  this  training.    Also  mention  that  the  three  focus  areas  will  be  quickly  introduced  first  and  that  a  group  activity  will   follow.        
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  16   Discussion:  Pillar  1:  How  do  we  add  'zing'  to  our  meeting?   After  introducing  the  topic  ask  the  learners  what  they  think  it  means  to  have  a  meeting  with  zing.     Ideally  they  will  call  out  a  list  of  adjectives  or  ideas  such  as  ,  quick,  fun,  interesting,  snappy,  exciting,   etc.       Lecture:       Using  the  Meetings  with  Zing  Mind  Map  as  a  guide,  discuss  with  the  audience  different  ways  to  add   Zing  to  a  meeting.    Slides  of  mind  map   The  mind  map  includes  items  such  as  Guest  Speakers,  Theme  Meetings,  Club  Culture,  Props,  Agendas.   Trainers  Note:    This  part  of  the  session  can  be  delivered  in  a  number  of  ways.    You  can  simply  talk  through   the  Mind  Maps  lecture  style,  or  you  can  be  more  interactive  by  asking  learners  to  offer  suggestions  about   how  they  add  zing  to  their  meetings.    If  you  make  it  interactive  then  you  may  want  to  lengthen  the   duration  of  this  part  by  a  couple  of  minutes.          
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  17       Lecture:  Pillar  2:  Processing  New  Members  -­‐  The  Lance  Miller  Model   Lance  Miller  the  2005  World  Champion  of  Public  Speaking  offers  this  model  as  a  way  to  think  about  how  to  process  people   from  guest  to  new  member.    The  model  suggests  that  Visitors  interact  with  each  executive  officer  in  a  particular  order  thus:     VPPR:  Attracts  Guest  to  Club  and  often  is  first  contact  person  -­‐  Creates  first  impression  outside  club   S@A:    Ensure  room  is  ready  and  meeting  starts  on  time  -­‐  Creates  first  impression  at  club   VPM:    Encourages  guest  to  join  and  processes  membership  application     Treasurer:    Takes  payment  and  processes  membership  with  VPM   VPE:    Programs  new  member  speeches  and  learning  activities   Secretary:    Keeps  membership  roster  up-­‐to-­‐date.   President:    Oversees  the  process     This  model  shows  how  each  club  executive  officer  is  important  in  the  processing  of  new  members.    Take  time  to  explain  how  a   slip  up  by  any  of  the  officers  can  impact  on  the  smooth  transition  from  guest  to  member.     Lecture:  Pillar  3    Succession  Planning     This  is  mostly  a  reminder  that  officers  should  start  thinking  about  succession  planning.    Explain  what   succession  planning  is  just  in  case  some  people  don't  know  (Succession  planning  is  the  process  of   picking  and  grooming  the  people  that  will  replace  you).    Succession  planning  should  consider  not  only  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  18   what  role  people  can  do  next  but  what  potential  they  have  for  future  years.     The  aim  of  succession  planning  is  to  ensure  a  smooth  transition  from  one  club  executive  to  the  next  and  that  some  more   mundane  issues  should     also  be  considered.    e.g.  transferring  member  roster  and  educational  award  database,  bank  account  signatories,  etc.     The  Three  Pillars  (Activity)  (20  minutes)   Background  Information  for  trainers:   The  learners  are  to  split  into  their  executive  officer  groups  and  discuss  the  focus  areas  above  in  relation  to  their  own  club   officer  position.  The  structure  of  the  discussion  should  be  constrained  to:     Before  the  meeting:    The  necessary  activities  that  occur  weeks,  days,  hours,  and  minutes  before  a  club  meeting.   At  the  meeting:    The  activities  that  occur  during  a  club  meeting.   After  the  meeting:    The  activities  that  occur  directly  (the  first  5  or  10  minutes)  after  a  club  meeting   closes.   Between  meetings:  The  days  and  weeks  between  one  meeting  and  the  next.     Activity:  3  Pillars    Workbook  and  Club  Officer  Cards     Introduce  the  session  by  saying  that  the  members  are  about  to  break  up  to  discuss  the  four  focus  areas  but  before  they  do  that   we  want  to  show  them  the  format  of  the  discussion.    Refer  to  the  workbook  page  and  show  them  the  structure  of  Before,   During,  After,  and  Between.    Explain  that  they  are  to  consider  each  focus  area.   Break  the  audience  into  their  executive  officer  groups  and  have  them  discuss  the  first  focus  area  (Meetings  with  Zing).    If  they   have  time  they  can  move  on  to  the  second  and  third  focus  areas,  but  that  this  is  not  mandatory.    Advise  them  that  they  will  be  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  19   presenting  back  to  the  whole  audience  afterwards  for  three  minutes  only.    Tell  them  that  they  only  have  15  minutes  for  this   activity.     Presentations:  3  Pillars  -­‐  Debrief     (20  minutes)  (2.5  minutes  per  executive  position)     With  everybody  back  in  the  room  and  focused  on  the  trainer  have  a  representative  from  each  group   report  to  the  audience.    Three  minutes  each.    Use  a  timer  and  lights  if  necessary.       Questions  (1  minute)   Take  two  or  three  questions  from  the  learners  before  recapping  and  concluding  this  session  on  a  high   note.     Summary  (1  minute)   In  this  session  we  have  looked  at  3  Pillars  for  the  continued  success  of  out  club.  Slide   Meetings  with  Zing   Processing  new  members  -­‐  The  Lance  Miller  Model   Succession  planning.  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  20       Where  to  from  here?  (1  minute)     1.  Undertake  to  increase  the  Zing  of  your  next  meeting     2.  Review  your  processes  for  converting  a  visitor  into  a  member   3.  If  you  haven't  already  started,  start  preparing  for  the  next  executive  team  and  consider  who  would   be  your  replacement.  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  21   Communicating  Across  The  Generations  (30  Minutes)   Quotation  (1  minute)   “We  are  each  members  of  our  own  generations,  and  our  world  views  are  colored  by  our  own  experiences”    Ann  Fishman,   Generational  Marketing  Expert.  We  have  to  work  at  understanding  the  feelings  and  behaviors  of  those  from  other  age  groups   to  effectively  communicate  and  market  to  them.”   Introduction     This  session  looks  at  different  generations,  and  provides  learners  with  an  insight  as  to  how  they  can   better  understand  what  the  different  generational  needs  and  interests  are,  and  how  they  like  to  be   communicated  to.    The  outcome  of  which  is  to  re-­‐engineer  how  they  market  their  clubs  to  both   prospective  and  existing  members.       Introducing  the  Different  Generations  (5  Minutes)     Lecture:    Each  generation  is  moulded  by  the  world  events  that  occur  during  its  formative  years.  For   example,  if  you  lived  through  the  Great  Depression,  you  carry  some  mark  of  that  experience.  You   save;  you  may  be  thrifty.  If  you  lived  through  the  Vietnam  War,  it  almost  certainly  affected  your   view  of  authority.  These  distinct  historical  experiences  create  characteristics  that  stay  with  people   throughout  the  rest  of  their  lives.       Currently  we  have  6  generations  that  coexist  in  our  country  today,  along  with  their  personality   types.    They  are:  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  22     The  G.I.s   The  Silents  aka  Builders   The  Boomers   Gen  X   Gen  Y  aka  Millennials   iGen  aka  Gen  Z   For  this  session  we  will  ignore  the  G.I.s  and  the  iGen  as  they  are  not  really  in  our  target  demographic  age  range.    Each  of  the   remaining  groups  can  easily  be  tagged  to  the  major  influences  in  their  lives.    E.g.   Silents:    World  War  II,  Robert  Menzies,  Radio   Boomers:  Vietnam  War,  Gough  Whitlam,  Television   Gen  X:  Fall  of  the  Berlin  Wall,  Bob  Hawke,  VCR   Gen  Y:  911,  John  Howard,  Playstation   Note:    refer  to  separate  pdf  document  from  McCrindle  Research,  "The  Generations  Defined   Sociologically"  for  more  information.   All  generations  react  to  various  methods  of  communication.  This  one  point  has  a  heavy  sway  on   how  we  look  to  get  our  word  out  there.  For  example,  if  we  are  targeting  Gen  Y  we  could  do  better  than  to  place  an   advertisement  in  the  local  newspaper.  If  we  do  not  have  a  web  presence  we  are  not  reaching  people  under  42.  The  younger  the   target  age  group  the  more  emphasis  must  be  put  on  social  media.  If  the  demographic  in  your  area  is   more  senior,  you  may  rely  more  on  traditional  methods.     Note:  If  time  permits  you  could  explore  with  the  audience  other  icons  that  are  representative  of  the   different  generations,  e.g.  cars,  movie  stars,  movies,  songs,  singers,  bands,  transportation,  fashion,  toys,   etc.    You  could  also  leave  this  activity  to  the  end  of  the  session.  Additional  Note:    There  is  no  real  need  to   do  this  activity,  so  do  it  only  if  you  need  to  fill  time,  or  as  a  fun  activity.  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  23   The  mind  maps  in  the  workbook  summarise  these  differences  in  greater  detail,  adding  information  about  typical  traits  of  the   different  generations,  what's  important  to  them,  and  their  preferred  methods  of  communication.     Note:    Give  learners  a  minute  or  two  to  look  over  the  mind  maps.   Activity  (15  minutes  +  10  minutes  =  25  minutes  total)   Group  Activity     (15  minutes)     In  small  groups  have  learners  choose  one  generational  group  and  discuss  how  they  could  apply  the  mind  map  information  to:       1.   Attract  new  members  to  their  club,     2.   Maintain  and  motivate  their  current  membership,     3.   Encourage  existing  members  to  take  on  executive  roles  within  their  club.       It  would  be  helpful  to  think  about  the  following  categories:  medium  (newspaper,  flyers,  radio,   internet,  TV),  phrases/slogans/words,  images,  communication  methods,  programs,  activities,  or   events  you  could  offer,  etc.     If  time  permits,  they  can  repeat  the  exercise  for  another  generational  group  and  compare  if  their  approach  to  the  second  group   would  be  different  to  the  first?   Debrief:       (10  minutes)    There  are  a  number  of  ways  to  debrief  this  session.    The  most  obvious  is  to  simply  have  people   tell  their  results  of  the  activity.    Other  ways  to  debrief  could  be  to  ask  if  people  agreed  or  disagree  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  24   with  the  information  in  the  mind  maps,  or  ask  if  anyone  has  any  examples  to  support  the  information  (any  ah-­‐ha  moments).     You  could  ask  if  anybody  explored  a  different  generational  group  to  their  own  (this  could  be  fun  with  the  right  respondents).     Feel  free  to  ask  the  audience  any  questions  you  like  to  debrief  and  summarise  this  topic.     Note:  If  anyone  objects  strongly  to  being  'categorised'  or  'stereo-­typed'  agree  with  them  and  say  you  understand  how  they  feel,  and   then  say  that  this  IS  one  of  the  problems  with  this  sort  of  exercise,  and  that  while  it  is  not  our  intention  to  pigeon-­hole  people  that  this   sort  of  exercise  is  useful  for  exploring  different  ways  of  communicating  to  different  people.     Another  objection  that  may  be  raised  is  that  like  most  things  the  majority  of  the  research  in  this  area  is  from  the  United  States   and  has  an  American  slant  to  it.    The  response  to  this  is  that  there  is  significant  Australian  Research  to  support  similar   conclusions,  most  specifically  refer  them  to    www.mccrindle.com.au  (Thanks  to  Alison  Lavick  for  this  link).   Questions  (1  minute)   Take  two  or  three  questions  from  the  learners  before  recapping  and  concluding  this  session  on  a   high  note.   Conclusion  (1  minute)   Trainers  Note:    This  session  lends  itself  more  to  a  conclusion  more  than  a  summary  which  has  been  used  for  the  other  sessions.       The  generation  gap  is  widening,  and  to  be  successful,  we  need  to  be  flexible  in  how  we  recruit,   retain,  manage,  and  motivate  people.  We  need  to  relate  to  all  generations  and  bridge  the  gaps  or   else  we  condemn  our  clubs  to  a  slow  death.      Each  generation  responds  to  different  cultures,   respects  different  rules,  need  different  types  of  guidance,  and  communicates  differently.    
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  25       As  leaders  of  our  clubs  we  should  constantly  ask  ourselves  do  we  have  an  eye  on  all  aspects  of   marketing  our  clubs?    Are  we  providing  a  contemporary  culture  in  order  to  provide  consistency   of  service  and  a  path  for  growth  for  the  individual?  And  finally  are  we  continually  renewing   ourselves  as  a  group  and  individually?       What's  the  next  step?  (1  minute)   Redesign  your  next  Membership  Building  and  Public  Relations  Campaign  to  be  more  attractive   to  your  target  market.   Submit  your  material  to  the  District  Public  Relations  Officer  before  30  April  and  you  might  win   this  year's  Public  Relations  Competition  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  26   Reference  Material,  Web  links  and  further  reading   Review  of  Last  Six  Months   www.eduweb.vic.gov.au—reffram.pdf   www.nwlink.com—reflection.html   Club  Culture   Quality  Club  Audit  -­‐  District  70  Website   Moments  of  Truth  -­‐  TI  website   www.swimcoachingbrain.com—creating-­‐a-­‐winning-­‐swimming-­‐club-­‐culture-­‐–-­‐excellence-­‐environment-­‐everything-­‐everyday-­‐ everybody/   www.distil.com.au—239-­‐club-­‐culture-­‐some-­‐questions-­‐to-­‐help-­‐you-­‐assess-­‐your-­‐clubs-­‐culture   Enhanced  club  leadership   toastmasters.wikia.com—Themes   www.toastmasters.org—ToastmastersOnstage.aspx   www.ehow.com—how_4947478_come-­‐creative-­‐themes-­‐toastmasters-­‐meeting.html   www.ehow.com—list_6505955_toastmaster-­‐meeting-­‐theme-­‐ideas.html  
  • District  70  Toastmasters  –  Advanced  Club  Leadership  Training  2011   Training  Session  Plan     Version  0.1   Page  27   Communicating  across  generations   marketing.about.com—generationmktg.htm   ldarrylarmstrong.wordpress.com—generational-­‐marketing   www.mccrindle.com.au—free-­‐resources.htm   Decision  making