Copyright cite sources 2013

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CYBERSAFETY FOR GRADES 4 AND 5 AT FIFTH AVENUE IN CITY SCHOOLS OF DECATUR

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Copyright cite sources 2013

  1. 1. + Find the Best Follow CopyrightCyberSafety Online Source LawsatFifthAvenue Cite Your Sources Sandi Dennis City Schools of Decatur, GA resources from www.learning.com
  2. 2. +
  3. 3. +Are there some sources that you are more likely to believe are true than others?
  4. 4. + Who owns ideas? People own their own ideas  Music-- Songwriters, performers, music companies?  Movies--Screenwriters, producers, directors, actors?  Writing-- Authors, editors, publishers?
  5. 5. + What is copyright?Copyright says that if you create something fromyour ideas, such as music, video, or writing, youown it.You get to decide--  If you want to give it away or charge for it.  Who should be able to use it and howWhat you create with your mind and yourimagination is your PROPERTY, just likea coator a desk.or a house.
  6. 6. + TAKING SOMEONE ELSE’S WORK AND SAYING IT’S YOURS IS AGAINST THE LAW. And it isn’t very nice either!
  7. 7. + What is copyrighted? Most creative work is copyrighted, but some people create things that are copyright-free, on purpose, so that anybody can use them. People create clip art, for example, that does not have a copyright.Sometimes we say work that is not copyrighted is in the public domain. HOW LONG DOES A COPYRIGHT LAST? In general, in the United States a copyright lasts until 70 years after the author’s death. HOW DO YOU GET YOUR WORK COPYRIGHTED? If you make something from your ideas, it is automatically copyrighted. You don’t have to do anything but create it.
  8. 8. + We have to give credit to the authors of any sources we use. Why? • Because people’s thoughts , ideas, and creative work are their PROPERTY, and they decide who gets to use them and how. • So people reading or watching our work can decide if our sources are credible.
  9. 9. + WHEN DON’T WE NEED TO IDENTIFY OUR SOURCES?We do not need to identify the source of well-known factsthat most people know or could easily look up.  There are 39.37 inches in a meter.  Reptiles are cold-blooded animals. Image 2/4/13 from http://wallpuper.com/lizard-and-varan-2849-lizard-and-varan- wallpaper.html
  10. 10. + What information do we need? • Author • Date of publication • Titles of resource • The publisher
  11. 11. + Terms you should knowBibliography—A list of resources on a topic.Citation—The identification of the source of information.Copyright—Law that makes sure that when people create anoriginal piece of writing, art, or music, they own it, and otherpeople cannot use it without the creator’s permission.FairUse—A policy that allows people to copy all or part of acopyrighted work for certain purposes, such as for educationalreasons.Paraphrase—Putting the information from a resource in differentwords that don’t change the meaning. Paraphrased informationmust be cited.Plagiarism—Saying that someone else’s ideas or words areyours.Publicdomain—Works that are not copyrighted and can beused by anyone. Usually applies to older works for which thecopyright has expired.

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