• Like
  • Save

10 Best Practices for Integrating your Customer Data

  • 599 views
Uploaded on

Data integration is often underestimated and poorly implemented, taking significant time and resource. Yet, it’s growing in strategic importance to the business, as customer data and touch points grow …

Data integration is often underestimated and poorly implemented, taking significant time and resource. Yet, it’s growing in strategic importance to the business, as customer data and touch points grow exponentially with the emergence of cloud, social and mobile technologies.

Learn more about common integration mistakes and best practices for making your company more agile through data integration.

More in: Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
599
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • As Director of Product Management, Paul Varley orchestrates the product planning, development and release processes at Scribe.As a Senior Sales Engineer for Scribe Software.  Pierre’s duties take him all over the world, meeting with organizations to help them understand how to integrate complex customer data.   Pierre has over 24 years of experience in information technology, sales, and marketing. He is a nationally-recognized expert in Dynamics CRM, and complex data migration and integration projects. Pierre was a contributing author to the book Teach Yourself Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 in 24 Hours.
  • In the coming months we will be hosting a new webinar series more specifically on topics covered in todays webinar.Of the last five we just covered which would you like to see in a deep dive.

Transcript

  • 1. 10 Best Practices for Integrating Your Customer Data Paul Varley, Director of Product Management Pierre Hulsebus, Senior Sales Engineer 1 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 2. Housekeeping • Phone lines are muted • Presentation is approximately 60 minutes • Use the “Questions” area of GTW to submit your questions • Questions will be addressed at the end of the presentation or by email follow up. CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 3. Agenda • Introductions • The 10 Best Practices - 3 You Say Integration, I Say Integration Have a Plan…With a Measurable Outcome The Real Budget Know Thy Systems Map Twice, Integrate Once Garbage In, Garbage Out Selecting An Approach Design vs Performance Setting Expectations Customer Involvement CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 4. About the Presenters Paul Varley – Director, Product Management Paul.Varley@scribesoft.com 4 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved. Pierre Hulsebus – Senior Sales Engineer Pierre.Hulsebus@scribesoft.com @Infuseme
  • 5. You Say Integration, I Say Integration 5 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 6. You Say Integration, I Say Integration • Integration is a broad term. • Drill down to the specifics of the business problem first. • It’s possible that integration is not the optimal solution to the problem. • Have a common definition and understanding between you and your customer of what the integration will do as an end goal. For example: - Eliminate manual data entry. - Automate a business process. - Provide missing information for a report or reports. 6 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 7. Have a Plan with a Measurable Outcome 7 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 8. Have a Plan with a Measureable Outcome • Your integration project should be focused on something tangible and valuable to your business. - Avoid the “we need to integrate our Sales & Marketing data!” imperative. • Start modestly and build on your successes. - If your goal is large or complex, chunk it up into bite-sized projects that have a very specific deliverable. - Tightly defined projects with very clear outcomes are usually the most successful. - Most integration projects can layer on each other – you don’t need to boil the ocean in the first phase. • Pick metrics with your customer that you both feel will show the success of the integration. 8 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 9. Your Real Budget 9 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 10. Your Real Budget • Include generous estimates for research and learning curve. • Make sure you understand any new costs that will arise from the integration: - Vendors sometime charge for API transactions. - You may need extra licenses or different licenses to access the system. - You may need to purchase or upgrade software or hardware. • If you’re planning on using a new integration tool or platform, include time and money for training. • Include the costs of on-going maintenance of the integration in your initial budget: - Who is going to “own” the integrations (and the tools used)? - What training do they need? (and ongoing training)? - Will we need professional services in the future for upgrades, etc? 10 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 11. Know Thy Systems 11 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 12. Know Thy Systems • It’s a good idea to manually enter data in your target systems and document the behavior of that data before you integrate: - New or changed data can trigger workflows or other cascading effects that you didn’t bargain for (and may be very difficult to undo). • Understand your application or data source limitations: - API throttling – time of day, number of transactions, etc. - What the API can and cannot do. - Alternate data access methods your vendor may offer (CSV file extract, direct database access, etc). - Know the data access techniques your vendor endorses (and supports) and which ones they don’t’. - What data your vendors gives access to and what it doesn’t. 12 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 13. Map Twice, Integrate Once 13 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 14. Map Twice, Integrate Once • Spend the time to document your mappings and workflows before you choose any integration approach or tool. - Excellent way to suss out issues well before you start the project (and how to handle them). - Excellent tool for discussion with customer if you have questions about how data should be transformed or presented. • Your integration design will be extremely helpful for picking the appropriate integration approach and platform. - You’ll have all the questions to ask your vendor, consultant, etc ahead of time. - You do not want to go down one path with an approach only to discover it won’t fit your needs after all. 14 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 15. Garbage In Garbage Out 15 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 16. Garbage In, Garbage Out • Integration will not fix bad business processes or bad data. • Bad data or bad process is the single biggest reason why integration projects and the applications are perceived to be “bad” or “not right for the company”. • You may have to “fix” the garbage before you integrate – there are many approaches to doing this: - Might be a separate project focused on removing dupes, old data, etc. - May be handled in-stream during integration with formulas and transformations. - May choose to synchronize a subset of data that fits a particular criteria (data less than 6 months old). - Etc. 16 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 17. Selecting An Approach 17 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 18. Selecting an Approach • There is no “the one club in the bag” – it is reasonable to expect that you might have 2 or more integration approaches over time. • Consider both the project and the person maintaining/using the integration approach in the future when you pick your approach. - Sometimes a more limited tool is better if the person has to do things quickly, easily, and lower cost. - Sometimes a broader platform is better if you know you’ll be doing a lot of integrations in the future to a lot of different things. • Pick the right approach for your business, needs, budgets, and appetite. - That might not be the trendy new thing in CIO Magazine or Computerworld. - Lots of options to choose from today. 18 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 19. Design & Performance 19 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 20. Design & Performance • There will always be tension between speed and complexity. Rarely can you have both great speed and great complexity, so plan accordingly. - You may have to do multiple passes to get what you need. • Integration tools and approaches can be hampered by the vendor and other outside factors. - API speeds, throttling. Not all APIs are designed for performance. - Things like databases could be hampered by hardware resources, index/table design, configurations, etc. - Network latency can be an issue with cloud integrations. Don’t expect speed on your single T1 for your 500 employees and your cloud integration. 20 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 21. Setting Expectations 21 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 22. Setting Expectations • Clear and constant dialogue with your customer is a must. • Explain to the customer factors that might put the project at risk or that you may have no control over. • Your customer may have very unrealistic expectations or doesn’t understand technologies. Have that conversation and dig deep to uncover any “technology beliefs”: - “we have to have 1 billion records updated every night in a 30 minute window” - “we expect that we should be loading 10,000 records a second” - “why can’t we spread the processing on everyone’s desktop or laptop like SETI and it will be really fast then” 22 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 23. Happy Customer, Successful Project 23 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 24. Happy Customer, Successful Project • Keep your customer busy throughout the project: - Validate processes as you go along. - Frequent user acceptance testing in a demo system is key. - Have frequent check-ins and status updates. • The more involved the customer, the better success of the project. 24 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 25. • Beginning the week of February 17th www.scribesoft.com/webinars 25 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.
  • 26. Contact Us • Paul Varley – Director, Product Management • Pierre Hulsebus – Senior Sales Engineer • Paul.Varley@scribesoft.com • Pierre.Hulsebus@scribesoft.com • @Infuseme www.scribesoft.com Questions? 26 CONFIDENTIAL Software Corporation. Software Corporation. All rights reserved. © 2014 Scribe | © 2012-2013 Scribe All rights reserved.