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Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
Asthma in the acute care setting
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Asthma in the acute care setting

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Presented by Dr.Amany Abo Zeid at Emergency Medicine Update Course held at Cairo, Egypt. Organized by Scribe www.scribeofegypt.com

Presented by Dr.Amany Abo Zeid at Emergency Medicine Update Course held at Cairo, Egypt. Organized by Scribe www.scribeofegypt.com

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
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  • 1. A M A N Y A B O U Z E I D M D , F R C P , F C C S P R O F . O F P U L M O N O L O G Y C A I R O U N I V E R S I T Y Asthma in the acute care setting
  • 2. Objectives  Definition of acute asthma.  Clinical assessment.  Level of severity.  Treatment of acute severe asthma.
  • 3. Definition of asthma exacerbation  Asthmatic exacerbations are defined as episodes of increased breathlessness, cough, wheezing, chest tightness or some combination of these symptoms.  Exacerbations may have a progressive or abrupt onset and are always related to decreases in expiratory (and in severe cases also in inspiratory) airflows that should be quantified objectively by lung function measurements(PEF;FEV1).GINA 2013.
  • 4. Epidemiology  Annual worldwide deaths from asthma have been estimated at 250,000 people.  Fatalities appear to have been decreasing worldwide over the past 15 years, even in the face of an increasing prevalence of the disease Drugs 2009; 69 (17): 2363-2391
  • 5. Clinical features Clinical features can identify some patients with severe asthma, e.g. severe breathlessness, tachypnea, tachycardia, silent chest, cyanosis, accessory muscle use, altered consciousness or collapse. None of these singly or together is specific. Their absence does not exclude a severe attack. Initial assessment – the role of symptoms, signs and measurements British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 6. Clinical features Clinical features can identify some patients with severe asthma, e.g. severe breathlessness, tachypnea, tachycardia, silent chest, cyanosis, accessory muscle use, altered consciousness or collapse. None of these singly or together is specific. Their absence does not exclude a severe attack. PEF or FEV1 Measurements of airway calibre improve recognition of severity and guide hospital or at home management decisions. PEF is more convenient and cheaper than FEV1. PEF as % previous best value or % predicted most useful Initial assessment – the role of symptoms, signs and measurements British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 7. Clinical features Clinical features can identify some patients with severe asthma, e.g. severe breathlessness, tachypnea, tachycardia, silent chest, cyanosis, accessory muscle use, altered consciousness or collapse. None of these singly or together is specific. Their absence does not exclude a severe attack. PEF or FEV1 Measurements of airway calibre improve recognition of severity and guide hospital or at home management decisions. PEF is more convenient and cheaper than FEV1. PEF as % previous best value or % predicted most useful Pulse Oximetry Necessary to determine adequacy of oxygen therapy and need for arterial blood gas measurement. Aim of oxygen therapy is to maintain SpO2 92% Initial assessment – the role of symptoms, signs and measurements British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 8. Clinical features Clinical features can identify some patients with severe asthma, e.g. severe breathlessness, tachypnea, tachycardia, silent chest, cyanosis, accessory muscle use, altered consciousness or collapse. None of these singly or together is specific. Their absence does not exclude a severe attack. PEF or FEV1 Measurements of airway calibre improve recognition of severity and guide hospital or at home management decisions. PEF is more convenient and cheaper than FEV1. PEF as % previous best value or % predicted most useful Pulse oximetry Necessary to determine adequacy of oxygen therapy and need for arterial blood gas measurement. Aim of oxygen therapy is to maintain SpO2 92% Blood gases (ABG) Necessary for patients with SpO2 <92% or other features of life threatening asthma Initial assessment – the role of symptoms, signs and measurements British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 9. Clinical features Clinical features can identify some patients with severe asthma, e.g. severe breathlessness, tachypnea, tachycardia, silent chest, cyanosis, accessory muscle use, altered consciousness or collapse. None of these singly or together is specific. Their absence does not exclude a severe attack. PEF or FEV1 Measurements of airway calibre improve recognition of severity and guide hospital or at home management decisions. PEF is more convenient and cheaper than FEV1. PEF as % previous best value or % predicted most useful Pulse oximetry Necessary to determine adequacy of oxygen therapy and need for arterial blood gas measurement. Aim of oxygen therapy is to maintain SpO2 92% Blood gases (ABG) Necessary for patients with SpO2 <92% or other features of life threatening asthma Chest X-ray Not routinely recommended in patients in the absence of: • suspected pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax • suspected consolidation • life threatening asthma • failure to respond to treatment satisfactorily • requirement for ventilation Initial assessment – the role of symptoms, signs and measurements British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 10. Clinical features Clinical features can identify some patients with severe asthma, e.g. severe breathlessness, tachypnea, tachycardia, silent chest, cyanosis, accessory muscle use, altered consciousness or collapse. None of these singly or together is specific. Their absence does not exclude a severe attack. PEF or FEV1 Measurements of airway calibre improve recognition of severity and guide hospital or at home management decisions. PEF is more convenient and cheaper than FEV1. PEF as % previous best value or % predicted most useful Pulse oximetry Necessary to determine adequacy of oxygen therapy and need for arterial blood gas measurement. Aim of oxygen therapy is to maintain SpO2 92% Blood gases (ABG) Necessary for patients with SpO2 <92% or other features of life threatening asthma Chest X-ray Not routinely recommended in patients in the absence of: • suspected pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax • suspected consolidation • life threatening asthma • failure to respond to treatment satisfactorily • requirement for ventilation Systolic paradox Abandoned as an indicator of the severity of an attack Initial assessment – the role of symptoms, signs and measurements British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 11. Levels of severity of acute asthma exacerbations Near fatal asthma Raised PaCO2 and/or requiring mechanical ventilation with raised inflation pressures British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 12. Levels of severity of acute asthma exacerbations Near fatal asthma Raised PaCO2 and/or requiring mechanical ventilation with raised inflation pressures Life threatening asthma Any one of the following in a patient with severe asthma: • PEF <33% best or predicted • SpO2 <92% • PaO2 <8 kPa • normal PaCO2 (4.6-6.0 kPa) • silent chest • cyanosis • feeble respiratory effort • bradycardia • dysrhythmia • hypotension • exhaustion • confusion • coma British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 13. Levels of severity of acute asthma exacerbations Near fatal asthma Raised PaCO2 and/or requiring mechanical ventilation with raised inflation pressures Life threatening asthma Any one of the following in a patient with severe asthma: • PEF <33% best or predicted • SpO2 <92% • PaO2 <8 kPa • normal PaCO2 (4.6-6.0 kPa) • silent chest • cyanosis • feeble respiratory effort • bradycardia • dysrhythmia • hypotension • exhaustion • confusion • coma Acute severe asthma Any one of: • PEF 33-50% best or predicted • respiratory rate 25/min • heart rate 110/min • inability to complete sentences in one breath British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 14. Levels of severity of acute asthma exacerbations Near fatal asthma Raised PaCO2 and/or requiring mechanical ventilation with raised inflation pressures Life threatening asthma Any one of the following in a patient with severe asthma: • PEF <33% best or predicted • SpO2 <92% • PaO2 <8 kPa • normal PaCO2 (4.6-60 kPa) • silent chest • cyanosis • feeble respiratory effort • bradycardia • dysrhythmia • hypotension • exhaustion • confusion • coma Acute severe asthma Any one of: • PEF 33-50% best or predicted • respiratory rate 25/min • heart rate 110/min • inability to complete sentences in one breath Moderate asthma exacerbation • Increasing symptoms • PEF >50-75% best or predicted • No features of acute severe asthma British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 15. Levels of severity of acute asthma exacerbations Near fatal asthma Raised PaCO2 and/or requiring mechanical ventilation with raised inflation pressures Life threatening asthma Any one of the following in a patient with severe asthma: • PEF <33% best or predicted • SpO2 <92% • PaO2 <8 kPa • normal PaCO2 (4.6-6.0 kPa) • silent chest • cyanosis • feeble respiratory effort • bradycardia • dysrhythmia • hypotension • exhaustion • confusion • coma Acute severe asthma Any one of: • PEF 33-50% best or predicted • respiratory rate 25/min • heart rate 110/min • inability to complete sentences in one breath Moderate asthma exacerbation • Increasing symptoms • PEF >50-75% best or predicted • No features of acute severe asthma Brittle asthma • Type 1: wide PEF variability (>40% diurnal variation for >50% of the time over a period >150 days) despite intense therapy • Type 2: sudden severe attacks on a background of apparently well-controlled asthma British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 16. Patients at risk of developing near fatal or fatal asthma Severe asthma Adverse behavioural or psychosocial features and Recognised by combination of: British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 17. Patients at risk of developing near fatal or fatal asthma and Adverse behavioural or psychosocial features Severe asthma recognised by one or more of: • previous near fatal asthma (previous ventilation or respiratory acidosis) • previous asthma admission • requiring 3 classes of asthma medication • heavy use of ß2 agonist • repeated attendances at A&E for asthma care • brittle asthma Recognised by combination of: British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 18. Patients at risk of developing near fatal or fatal asthma Severe asthma Adverse behavioural or psychosocial features recognised by one or more of: • non-compliance with treatment or monitoring • failure to attend appointments • self-discharge from hospital • psychosis, depression, other psychiatric illness or deliberate self-harm • current or recent major tranquilliser use • denial • alcohol or drug abuse • obesity • learning difficulties • employment problems • income problems • social isolation • childhood abuse • severe domestic, marital or legal stress and Recognised by combination of: British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 19. Lessons learnt from studies of asthma deaths Many deaths from asthma are preventable – 88-92% of attacks requiring hospitalisation develop over 6 hours Factors include: •inadequate objective monitoring •failure to refer earlier for specialist advice •inadequate treatment with steroids British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 20. British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 21. British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 22. British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 23. If the patient did not respond  NIPPV should be considered in ICU and it is unlikely it would replace intubation in this unstable patients
  • 24. British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 25. Oxygen  Many patients with acute severe asthma are hypoxaemic.  Supplementary oxygen should be given urgently to hypoxaemic patients, using a face mask, Venturi mask or nasal cannulae with flow rates adjusted as necessary to maintain SpO2 of 94-98%.  Hypercapnea indicates the development of near-fatal asthma and the need for emergency specialist/anaesthetic intervention. British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 26. β2-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists  In most cases inhaled β2 agonists given in high doses act quickly to relieve bronchospasm with few side effects1  SABAs potentially induce additional responses that may be of benefit in asthma, such as:2 1. Decreased vascular permeability 2. Increased mucociliary clearance 3. Inhibition of release of mast cell mediators. 4. Oxgen driven neubliser : continuoustly given. 1-British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012 2- Drugs 2009; 69 (17): 2363-2391
  • 27. Corticosteroids  Corticosteroids are recommended for most patients in the emergency department, especially:  Those who do not respond completely to initial SABA therapy,  Those whose exacerbation develops even though they were already taking oral corticosteroids  Those with previous exacerbations requiring oral corticosteroids Drugs 2009; 69 (17): 2363-2391
  • 28.  Steroids reduce mortality, relapses, subsequent hospital admission and requirement for β2 agonist therapy.  The earlier they are given in the acute attack the better the outcome.  It is not known if inhaled steroids provide further benefit in addition to systemic steroids.  Inhaled steroids should however be started, or continued as soon as possible to commence the chronic asthma management plan Corticosteroids British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 29. Magnesium Sulfate  Studies report the safe use of nebulized magnesium sulphate, in a dose of 135 mg-1152 mg, in combination with β2 agonists, with a trend towards benefit in hospital admission.  A single dose of IV magnesium sulphate is safe and may improve lung function in patients with acute severe asthma British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 30. Anticholinergics  Combining nebulized ipratropium bromide with a nebulized β2 agonist produces significantly greater bronchodilation than a β2 agonist alone, leading to a faster recovery and shorter duration of admission.  Anticholinergic treatment is not necessary and may not be beneficial in milder exacerbations of asthma or after stabilization British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 31. Intravenous Aminophylline  In acute asthma, IV aminophylline is not likely to result in any additional bronchodilation compared to standard care with inhaled bronchodilators and steroids.  Side effects such as arrhythmias and vomiting are increased if IV aminophylline is used British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 32. Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists  There is insufficient evidence at present to make a recommendation about the use of leukotriene receptor antagonists in the management of acute asthma British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 33. Antibiotics  When an infection precipitates an exacerbation of asthma it is likely to be viral.  The role of bacterial infection has been overestimated.  Routine prescription of antibiotics is not indicated for acute asthma. British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 34. Heliox  The use of heliox, (helium/oxygen mixture in a ratio of 80:20 or 70:30), either as a driving gas for nebulizers, as a breathing gas, or for artificial ventilation in adults with acute asthma is not supported on the basis of present evidence. British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
  • 35. Heliox  A systematic review of ten trials, including 544 patients with acute asthma, found no improvement in pulmonary function or other outcomes in adults treated with heliox, although the possibility of benefit in patients with more severe obstruction exists. British Guideline on the Management of Asthma revised Jan 2012
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