Developing Electronic Educational Content for Museums
2010 Educational Technology Think Tank
Think Tank Participants <ul><li>Willamarie Moore </li></ul><ul><li>MFA Boston   </li></ul><ul><li>Tina Olson </li></ul><ul...
Full Think Tank Recommendations http://bit.ly/attA9h
 
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  - MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Art21 Educators Marc Mayer - Art21
Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
Art Finder Art Collector Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
What can museum-based educational technology do well?
What can museum-based educational technology do well? <ul><li>Break down physical and geographic barriers. </li></ul>Slide...
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
What can museum-based educational technology do well? <ul><li>A single product can support the learning styles and interes...
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
What can technology do well? <ul><li>Sharing process, product and revision while integrating community feedback. </li></ul...
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Marc Mayer - Art21
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Marc Mayer - Art21
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Marc Mayer - Art21
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Marc Mayer - Art21
 
 
What can museum-based educational technology do well? <ul><li>Web Interactivity provides models that can be customized and...
Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
What are some of the greatest challenges in working with educational technology?
Greatest challenges <ul><li>Engaging educators in iterative, technology-based work processes.  </li></ul><ul><li>User expe...
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
Greatest challenges <ul><li>Hard to manage massive amounts of fragmented static content </li></ul>12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide ...
Greatest challenges <ul><li>Hard to manage massive amounts of fragmented static content </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainability o...
Challenges <ul><li>A dynamic online environment needs to be attended to </li></ul>Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
Challenges <ul><li>A dynamic online environment needs to be attended to </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of users need cultiv...
Challenges <ul><li>A dynamic online environment needs to be attended to </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of users need cultiv...
Challenges <ul><li>A dynamic online environment needs to be attended to </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of users need cultiv...
Challenges <ul><li>A dynamic online environment needs to be attended to </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of users need cultiv...
Recommendations for developing electronic educational content for museums.
Recommendations <ul><li>Involve multiple stakeholders in the beginning – Collaboration and buy-in from target audience </l...
Recommendations <ul><li>Involve multiple stakeholders in the beginning – Collaboration and buy-in from target audience </l...
12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide  Willamarie Moore  -  MFA Boston
Recommendations <ul><li>Develop trust and respect users as producers - foster and invest in crowd-sourcing.    </li></ul>1...
Recommendations <ul><li>Develop trust and respect users as producers - foster and invest in crowd-sourcing.    </li></ul><...
Recommendations <ul><li>Develop trust and respect users as producers - foster and invest in crowd-sourcing.    </li></ul><...
Recommendations <ul><li>If you decide to develop an interactive web site with user-created content, consider developing a ...
When you submit a Set you are sharing it  with everyone who uses ArtsConnectEd. Please consider the following before you c...
What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content?
What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Adopt a broader definition of wh...
What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Adopt a broader definition of wh...
What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Adopt a broader definition of wh...
What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Adopt a broader definition of wh...
What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Develop systems and processes fo...
What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Develop systems and processes fo...
What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Develop systems and processes fo...
What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Develop systems and processes fo...
Questions, Questions, Questions Twitter #aam2010
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AAM 2010 Developing Electronic Educational Content for Museums Thinktank

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http://blogs.walkerart.org/ecp/2010/05/26/developing-content-for-technology/

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  • 2-min elevator speech: MFA Educators Online is a web-based resource drawing on the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston’s extensive online collection. Developed with and for teachers, the site allows both Museum staff and classroom educators to create and share custom art galleries online. Teachers can browse our collection, choose artwork, and add their own materials such as lesson plans or multimedia presentations, to create unique learning objects that are directly relevant their curriculum needs. Teachers can share their galleries with colleagues and students online, or in the classroom. Since the site’s original launch about 4 years ago, we have seen usership steadily increase. At present, our stats show over 32,000 unique visitors to the site, and among those who opted to fill in their demographic information, we are thrilled to see registered users from all 50 states in this country, as well as 44 other countries, including France, Spain, China, and Japan--not too surprising, but also some of the more unlikely places like Argentina, Cyprus, Egypt, and Indonesia. These users have created over 3,000 different Online Galleries, though only 421 have been made public -- an interesting window into the psychology of people’s comfort level with sharing their educational materials. With the launch of our Phase II of the project last fall, we have developed several new features, including social tagging and Online Classrooms. In terms of the new tagging function, 2,053 different art objects have so far been tagged with 12,176 different tag instances. Our biggest new arena—still in beta-testing—is that of the online/virtual classrooms, which are meant to encourage student engagement with the online galleries their teachers have created. I’ll be talking more about this later. MFA Educators Online is enabling us to achieve our goal to support art-based activities and experiences for students and teachers, particularly in the classroom, and before or after a Museum visit.
  • Breaking barriers: Obviously, by making the MFA’s collection of over 300,000 artwork images accessible on the web, people do not have to be in Boston to teach and learn from our collection. As I mentioned earlier, we have registered users on MFA Educators Online from literally all over the world. A recent example I’ll just quickly share, is the “inadvertent international exchange” that has taken place around the MFA’s famous pair of six-paneled Japanese screens , Dragon and Tiger , by Hasegawa Tohaku (1539-1610), who is celebrated as one of the greatest painters in Japan.
  • 2010 marks the 400 th anniversary of the artist’s death, and Nanao City (Ishikawa prefecture), where he was born, planned major celebrations. Originally, they inquired about borrowing our pair of screens… and our curatorial department was not able to grant that request. However, through our online resources, elementary school students in Nanao City were able to access the images, and make monochromatic sumi-e ink paintings in response.
  • This is a screen shot of the Online Gallery that shows the Hasegawa Tohaku screens from our collection, and a selection of some of the children’s artwork. (I encourage you to check it out more closely on your own, later.)
  • The other point I would like to make in response to this question is that when designed well, a single online learning platform can support a variety of learning styles. I would like to highlight the new “Activities” in the “Virtual Classroom” feature that we’re currently beta-testing.
  • This new Virtual Classroom feature is one that teachers asked for. They—especially secondary school teachers—are eager to have their students go online and interact directly with the artworks pulled together in an Online Gallery. So we’ve designed templates to allow for students’ written response, image response, and audio/narration response. But first, a teacher must create the Virtual Classroom: again, a helpful 3-step wizard… Step 1: Classroom Name and brief Description Step 2: Which is OPTIONAL: adding co-teachers. (In our work with schools and teachers in recent years, we’ve learned about the growing trend of team-teaching, or collaborative teaching. So adding co-teachers will set them up as co-administrators for the Virtual Classroom, allowing them to edit/add activities, review student responses, etc.) Allows for adding up to 5 co-teachers. If user who has been added is not an existing Ed Online user, then an email will be sent prompting them to register. This process ends with an email being sent to the co-teachers who have been set up as administrators in this way. Step 3: Student Settings Third step in the wizard lets teacher specify how student names will be displayed on screen, and set a classroom code for student access. Options are First Name and Last Initial, or Student ID. We had heard concern from teachers, and their schools’ varying policies re: student identities online. This allows them that choice. Then the teacher sets the Classroom Password, and is ready to then build Activities!...
  • First screen: find a gallery or an artwork to create an activity from. User can select something from their favorites, or search for a gallery or artwork.
  • In step 2, user chooses what activity type it is: Text, Image, or Audio/Narration. Type is required. These types define how the students will respond when completing an activity. In text, they will write a short or long text response to the assignment. In image activities, they will post an image in response. In audio/narration, an audio file will be posted. Supported image formats: JPEG, GIF, PNG Supported audio formats: WAV, MP3, M4A Also in this step, teacher also provides a title/name for the activity, describes the assignment (short text paragraph with instructions), and enters a due date. The last screen previews the activity in brief.
  • For example, one teacher that we’ve been working with… A high school English teacher created an Online Gallery around Dorothy Krause’s Vietnam Journal prints. She developed a series of Activities for her students…
  • … who would click on View Activity, and see this: the Activity instructions; then view the Slideshow; then post their response in the space below.
  • Ms. Murphy created several Activities, all related to this one Online Gallery. The first was a basic essay response to looking closely at one image of the students’ choice. For the second Activity, she’s having them find a photograph that was taken on a memorable day in their own lives. They’re to upload it with a caption. This is an Image-based Activity. After that, they are to narrate the story of their memorable day, making reference to the photograph they’ve uploaded. This is an Audio Activity. The students are to upload their narration as a WAV, MP3, M4A file. Finally, the culminating essay is for the students to turn this into a compelling personal narrative story, capturing the most significant emotional truth of that story. “How can you add details to your story that will allow your readers to feel like they are there with you?…” The variety of Activities that Ms. Murphy has developed allow the students to express themselves in different ways.
  • Our philosophy in MFA School Programs is “for teachers with teachers.” We work closely with an Educator Advisory Board, not only to stay up-to-date on current classroom needs and issues, not only to make sure our programs are as relevant to those needs and issues as possible, but also to harness the direct experience and expertise of teachers themselves. Interestingly/ironically, when it came to developing online resources, we quickly found that there was a significant lack of experience and expertise among teachers. I don’t mean to make a sweeping generalization about teachers lagging behind in the arena of technology --though it has been our experience that the majority still are-- but even those superstar, innovative educators are often constrained by a lack of basic technology infrastructure at their schools. Some of you may have heard the talk I gave last year, detailing our experience of working with teachers to develop MFA Educators Online. I used the analogy of a piece of technology that we’re all familiar with…
  • [BICYCLE], when we found ourselves in the fortunate-and-unusual position [BOW] of having money and a mandate from our administration to develop online teacher resources. When we went to our Educ Adv Board and said, “come play! What shall we do?” …
  • … we quickly learned that the teachers didn’t know how to ride it. We had to back way up…
  • … and ended up, during the first 18-months, having to conduct major Teacher Professional Development around online teaching and learning, before we were able to develop a site that they could use. The lesson learned here is that there is a delicate balance that’s needed -- a constant negotiation to match expectations from both directions, the Museum and the teacher audience.
  • I really referenced this first point already -- even though it’s one of the serious challenges, it is well worth the investment to collaborate with your target audience from the get-go. The second point is really what we see as our growth area.
  • I really referenced this first point already -- even though it’s one of the serious challenges, it is well worth the investment to collaborate with your target audience from the get-go. The second point is really what we see as our growth area.
  • Beyond the “Help” page; beyond the short video testimonials by teachers who use the site… We see an opportunity/need to create a set of guidelines, tips, forums for sharing ideas -- again, ideally co-created with teacher users. Those teachers with whom we have been working very closely during the past year, are now asking for this kind of idea-sharing space, particularly around the Online Classroom and Activities features. We have really come a long way! And it will be exciting to see where we go with this, as we continue to evolve the resource in the coming years.
  • AAM 2010 Developing Electronic Educational Content for Museums Thinktank

    1. 1. Developing Electronic Educational Content for Museums
    2. 2. 2010 Educational Technology Think Tank
    3. 3. Think Tank Participants <ul><li>Willamarie Moore </li></ul><ul><li>MFA Boston </li></ul><ul><li>Tina Olson </li></ul><ul><li>Portland Museum of Art </li></ul><ul><li>Tim Svenonious </li></ul><ul><li>SFMOMA </li></ul><ul><li>Marc Mayer </li></ul><ul><li>Art21 </li></ul><ul><li>Sarah Schultz Susan Rotilie </li></ul><ul><li>Robin Dowden Abby Anderson Walker Art Center </li></ul><ul><li>Sheila McGuire Treden Wagoner Minneapolis Institute of Art </li></ul><ul><li>Kris Wetterlund </li></ul><ul><li>Scott Sayre </li></ul><ul><li>Sandbox Studios </li></ul>
    4. 4. Full Think Tank Recommendations http://bit.ly/attA9h
    5. 6. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    6. 7. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Art21 Educators Marc Mayer - Art21
    7. 8. Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    8. 9. Art Finder Art Collector Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    9. 10. What can museum-based educational technology do well?
    10. 11. What can museum-based educational technology do well? <ul><li>Break down physical and geographic barriers. </li></ul>Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    11. 12. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    12. 13. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    13. 14. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    14. 15. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    15. 16. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    16. 17. What can museum-based educational technology do well? <ul><li>A single product can support the learning styles and interests of multiple audiences. </li></ul>Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    17. 18. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    18. 19. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    19. 20. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    20. 21. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    21. 22. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    22. 23. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    23. 24. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    24. 25. What can technology do well? <ul><li>Sharing process, product and revision while integrating community feedback. </li></ul><ul><li>Captures content (people, processes and events) with unscripted spontaneity. </li></ul>12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Marc Mayer - Art21
    25. 26. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Marc Mayer - Art21
    26. 27. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Marc Mayer - Art21
    27. 28. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Marc Mayer - Art21
    28. 29. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Marc Mayer - Art21
    29. 32. What can museum-based educational technology do well? <ul><li>Web Interactivity provides models that can be customized and dynamic . </li></ul>Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    30. 33. Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    31. 34. Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    32. 35. Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    33. 36. Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    34. 37. Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    35. 38. What are some of the greatest challenges in working with educational technology?
    36. 39. Greatest challenges <ul><li>Engaging educators in iterative, technology-based work processes. </li></ul><ul><li>User expectations that content creators use state-of-the-art, intuitive methods and technologies. </li></ul>12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    37. 40. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    38. 41. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    39. 42. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    40. 43. Greatest challenges <ul><li>Hard to manage massive amounts of fragmented static content </li></ul>12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Marc Mayer - Art21
    41. 44. Greatest challenges <ul><li>Hard to manage massive amounts of fragmented static content </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainability of technological platforms, resources and hardware </li></ul>12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Marc Mayer - Art21
    42. 45. Challenges <ul><li>A dynamic online environment needs to be attended to </li></ul>Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    43. 46. Challenges <ul><li>A dynamic online environment needs to be attended to </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of users need cultivating and tending </li></ul>Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    44. 47. Challenges <ul><li>A dynamic online environment needs to be attended to </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of users need cultivating and tending </li></ul><ul><li>No content is ever “se t in stone ” </li></ul>Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    45. 48. Challenges <ul><li>A dynamic online environment needs to be attended to </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of users need cultivating and tending </li></ul><ul><li>No content is ever “se t in stone ” </li></ul><ul><li>Technology is ever changing </li></ul>Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    46. 49. Challenges <ul><li>A dynamic online environment needs to be attended to </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of users need cultivating and tending </li></ul><ul><li>No content is ever “se t in stone ” </li></ul><ul><li>Technology is ever changing </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion: Dynamic technology projects need to become part of the work flow for staff going forward </li></ul>Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    47. 50. Recommendations for developing electronic educational content for museums.
    48. 51. Recommendations <ul><li>Involve multiple stakeholders in the beginning – Collaboration and buy-in from target audience </li></ul>12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    49. 52. Recommendations <ul><li>Involve multiple stakeholders in the beginning – Collaboration and buy-in from target audience </li></ul><ul><li>Provide context for how material is designed to be used (learning, audience, timeliness) </li></ul>12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    50. 53. 12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Willamarie Moore - MFA Boston
    51. 54. Recommendations <ul><li>Develop trust and respect users as producers - foster and invest in crowd-sourcing.  </li></ul>12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Marc Mayer - Art21
    52. 55. Recommendations <ul><li>Develop trust and respect users as producers - foster and invest in crowd-sourcing.  </li></ul><ul><li>Cultivate community of learners.  </li></ul>12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Marc Mayer - Art21
    53. 56. Recommendations <ul><li>Develop trust and respect users as producers - foster and invest in crowd-sourcing.  </li></ul><ul><li>Cultivate community of learners.  </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthen bonds and relationships that are made in person. </li></ul>12:08 AM AAM 2010 Slide Marc Mayer - Art21
    54. 57. Recommendations <ul><li>If you decide to develop an interactive web site with user-created content, consider developing a “s o ft criteria ” (guidelines and models) for user submitted content. </li></ul>Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    55. 58. When you submit a Set you are sharing it with everyone who uses ArtsConnectEd. Please consider the following before you choose to submit a Set: * Write a Description for your set that includes the main idea your set illustrates and how you would use the resource in the classroom * Use Spell Check and write clearly throughout * If you quote someone else’s words, name the source * For each slide, consider what you will include in the Annotation box. You may use museum label information to identify images, include existing texts or links, write your own questions/comments, or leave it blank to just show the image. Susan Rotilie - Walker Art Center
    56. 59. What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content?
    57. 60. What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Adopt a broader definition of what our content is, including the embracing of a more informal voice </li></ul>
    58. 61. What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Adopt a broader definition of what our content is, including the embracing of a more informal voice </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize and value their role as a public content provider </li></ul>
    59. 62. What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Adopt a broader definition of what our content is, including the embracing of a more informal voice </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize and value their role as a public content provider </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a system for rapidly responding to opportunities to capture media (documentation) </li></ul>
    60. 63. What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Adopt a broader definition of what our content is, including the embracing of a more informal voice </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize and value their role as a public content provider </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a system for rapidly responding to opportunities to capture media (documentation) </li></ul><ul><li>Develop standards for the craft of capturing content - interview processes, content and production standards </li></ul>
    61. 64. What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Develop systems and processes for facilitating production, work flow, integration and access </li></ul>
    62. 65. What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Develop systems and processes for facilitating production, work flow, integration and access </li></ul><ul><li>Develop technical knowledge within in-house staff to guide development, even if it is performed by external contractors </li></ul>
    63. 66. What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Develop systems and processes for facilitating production, work flow, integration and access </li></ul><ul><li>Develop technical knowledge within in-house staff to guide development, even if it is performed by external contractors </li></ul><ul><li>Value the importance of collecting and archiving electronic media and documentation as much as accessioned items </li></ul>
    64. 67. What roles can museums play in supporting the development of educational content? <ul><li>Develop systems and processes for facilitating production, work flow, integration and access </li></ul><ul><li>Develop technical knowledge within in-house staff to guide development, even if it is performed by external contractors </li></ul><ul><li>Value the importance of collecting and archiving electronic media and documentation as much as accessioned items </li></ul><ul><li>Build knowledge of best practices and uses of educational technology through staff, director, and Board training </li></ul>
    65. 68. Questions, Questions, Questions Twitter #aam2010

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