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Lessons learnt from the Observatory project
Lessons learnt from the Observatory project
Lessons learnt from the Observatory project
Lessons learnt from the Observatory project
Lessons learnt from the Observatory project
Lessons learnt from the Observatory project
Lessons learnt from the Observatory project
Lessons learnt from the Observatory project
Lessons learnt from the Observatory project
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Lessons learnt from the Observatory project

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Caren Milloy, from JISC, on what the findings have been in investigating the impact of e-books on library services.

Caren Milloy, from JISC, on what the findings have been in investigating the impact of e-books on library services.

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • Briefing Event
  • Transcript

    • 1. 16 June 2010 | Project Board Meeting | Slide Lessons learnt from the Observatory project
    • 2. 5 Themes
      • Know your users
      • Go out and get what they want
      • Tell them you’ve got it
      • Keep on connecting
      • Share your knowledge
    • 3. 1. Know your users
      • “ Know who controls your destiny and focus on their needs relentlessly”
      • (Prichard, Ingram Digital)
      • Be creative about gathering knowledge on user behaviours
    • 4. 2. Go out and get it
      • Will an e-book that only allows one person to access it meet your users needs?
      • Do you users care if an e-book will disappear off their e-reader after a month?
      • What do your users want to do with the content?
      • Are you getting what you need as a librarian?
      • What about preservation?
      • Does the licence cover all your users or just some?
      • Can you clearly articulate to your users what they can and cant do?
    • 5. 2. Go out and get it
      • Negotiating licenses and business models is time consuming
      • Stay in control
      • Don’t assume – know that the e-book product will meet your needs
      • “ Effective promotion requires effective products”
      • (Librarian)
    • 6. 3. Tell them you’ve got it
      • “ Students are navigating from one system to another – all of which have different functionalities and different bells and whistles with respect to searching, limiting, indexing, saving etc, and it is confusing for users….they literally have to reframe their minds when moving from one system to another and this requires patience, persistence and is time consuming”
      • (UBiRD)
      • Take control of your catalogue and library website! Simplify.
    • 7. 4. Keep on connecting
      • Analyse your usage statistics
      • Continue to do surveys
      • Engage your users
      • Find out what they like about the e-book products you have
      • Consider if too much choice is paralysing them
      • Always keep on an eye on the periphery
      • Tell them what you have done for them!
    • 8. 5. Share your knowledge
      • Experiment
      • Collaborate
      • Discuss
      • Use your collective influence to get what you and your users need
      • Yes you can!
    • 9.
      • Caren Milloy
      • Head of Projects
      • JISC Collections
      • [email_address]
      • Twitter / carenmilloy

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