Co-Creating Value through Collaborative Entertainment

1,183 views
1,116 views

Published on

This presentation summarizes Brain Candy, LLC's alternative content model that balances the benefits of participatory entertainment with the needs of content owners: co-creating value through collaborative commercial entertainment; building bridges between content creators and audiences; and creating new revenue streams for content owners and fans.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,183
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
30
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Co-Creating Value through Collaborative Entertainment

  1. 1. Remix Realities & Participatory Possibilities Audiences have long expressed their creative interest through the lens of others’ intellectual  property. Remixing, sampling, and mashing up content is now cheaper and easier than ever,  thanks to the digital age we live in.  Examples are abundant: the Youtube “Downfall” film remix meme, countless derivative  works of copyrighted comic and anime characters on deviantart.com, fan fiction, the Star  Wars Uncut project (http://www.starwarsuncut.com/), etc.  Irrespective of the legalities of such derivative works – fair use notwithstanding – the reality  is that audiences will interact with content on their own creative terms with increasing  frequency. The desire, the skills, and the tools are here to stay.  One response is to continue the whack‐a‐mole approach of relentlessly stamping out never‐ ending copyright violations that pits creators and audiences in an adversarial light.  Another is to channel the audience’s enthusiasm and creative competence in ways that  benefit creators and audiences alike. Some creators doing just this by experimenting with  new forms of legal licensing, audience participation, and collaborative storytelling:  Creative Commons licenses, especially non‐commercial versions, are being used by  filmmakers (the “Cosmonaut” project, http://www.thecosmonaut.org/), published  authors (Jim Butcher, Cory Doctorow, and Charles Stross), and musicians (NIN’s Trent  Reznor).  Collaborative storytelling is now a fundamental aspect of some projects (“Cathy’s  Book” (http://www.cathysbook.com/) and Disney’s take180.com).  A great illustration of crowdsourced marketing is Kraft Food’s “Love in Action” film.  The story was sourced from the public, and consumers chose the lead actors, the  names of the protagonists, and the clothes they wore (some were even extras in the  film!).  These examples hint at the possibilities of co‐creating value through collaboration and  demonstrate individual pieces of the larger collaborative puzzle.  The audience participation tide is rising, and content creators can either ride the wave it’s  bringing or be washed out to sea by it. 2
  2. 2. Co-Creating Value Through Collaboration What if…there was a way for AUDIENCES to actively participate in the creative process of  commercial entertainment?  And what if…audience PARTICIPATION did not jeopardize property owners’  commercial and editorial rights over their content?  And what if …there was a way for property owners and  audiences to CO‐CREATE VALUE?  Brain Candy, LLC (BCL) believes the answer is a collaborative approach to commercial  entertainment properties that builds a bridge between official content (canon) and user‐ generated content (fanon or UGC). This bridge allows property owners to co‐create value  with their audiences while still retaining commercial and editorial control over content.  Importantly, co‐creating value with fans does not require a loss of ownership, commercial  control, or canonical authority for property owners. But it does require a new way of viewing  how audiences engage with content.  Put simply, traditional entertainment is a monologue; collaborative entertainment is a  dialogue. Converting entertainment into a conversation yields benefits that cannot be  achieved with traditional create‐distribute‐consume content production. Further, including  audiences in the creative process sets up a situation where value is co‐created by property  owners and audiences.  Value co‐creation solutions:   View fans as a source of competence   Find ways to constructively integrate UGC into entertainment properties   Recognize that contributing canonical content is the deepest form of engagement a  fan can have with an entertainment property   Provide the mechanisms for accessing value in UGC  3
  3. 3. Traditional entertainment content management ignores or actively suppresses UGC. It is an  ‘either‐or’ mentality that forever separates official content from unofficial content, locking  out property owners from the value of UGC.  FANON  CANON FANON CANON  Unofficial  Official  Non‐Commercial  Commercial  Unofficial  Official  Official  UGC Collaborative  Creative Space  Traditional Entertainment Model Collaborative Entertainment Model    A collaborative approach to entertainment actively seeks value in UGC by working with  audiences to create content within the property. The result is the emergence of a third kind  of content, generated by audiences and acknowledged by property owners. This ‘and’  approach to content generates value for audiences and property owners alike.  BCL works with property owners to develop, launch, and maintain these collaborative  creative spaces with audiences, providing the following benefits to property owners:   deeper engagement with existing audiences   ability to secure new audiences   new sources of monetizable content   lower production/acquisition costs of content   cheaply/quickly gauge audience interest in digital content before committing costly  resources to producing physical content      4
  4. 4. The Collaborative Property Model BCL’s Collaborative Property Model (CPM) is used to prepare for, develop, and implement  collaborative creative spaces within intellectual properties. The CPM outlines a  comprehensive approach to extending properties through collaborative creative spaces. BCL  uses the model as a method for working with clients to construct custom licensing  frameworks and narrative structures that will support a co‐creative approach to content  generation.  The model is flexible and scalable, works with new, active, and dormant properties, and can  be utilized across many mediums: video games, movies, television shows, role‐playing  games, etc. Importantly, the CPM balances the needs of property owners with the benefits  of including the creative community in a collaborative process.  Opening up an intellectual property for collaboration requires new skills beyond those used  for traditional entertainment content creation. There are significant considerations that  separate collaborative properties from traditional properties: creative, operational, and  legal.  The CPM helps clients and BCL methodically work their way through these considerations.  5
  5. 5. The World Narrative The heart of the CPM is what BCL calls the “world narrative.” The world narrative is a  comprehensive way of viewing entertainment properties. The world narrative may consist of  a single story told in a single medium, or it may be a collection of stories distributed across  many mediums.  Each story is managed with the larger world narrative in mind, and collaborative creative  spaces and world extensions are built out in a way that naturally expand the world narrative  without corrupting continuity or coherence.  World Structure Stories : Mediums World Narrative Monomedia 1 : 1 story Multimedia 1 : Many story story 1 story 2 Transmedia Many : Many story 3 story 4   Whatever the nature of the intellectual property, the CPM provides the mechanisms for  installing world narrative “entry points” where audiences can contribute content within a  collaborative creative space. Entry points are explicit calls for collaboration with audiences.  Entry points can be small and limited in scope (“Please submit a drawing of Savage Kor  fighting a skeleton” or “Please write, in 1,000 words or less, a story about Alison discovering  she can see ghosts”) or more open‐ended (“Please submit a short story, image, or video set  in the “Dawn of Time” world). Entry points can span one or more mediums, characters, and  stories within a world narrative.  The ease with which UGC is integrated into the official world depends greatly on how the  entry points are constructed and how the collaborative creative spaces are configured.  When done correctly, the UGC can provide multiple uses within the world narrative through  re‐contextualization (remix, re‐use, and repackaging).  6
  6. 6. Collaborative Entertainment Services  Every entertainment endeavor should begin with top quality content, but that’s just the  beginning. Without the necessary operational systems, appropriate legal frameworks, and  measurable metrics, even the best content can fail to meet the goals of property owners.  This is even truer for collaborative commercial properties.  Given the unique nature of collaborative entertainment, BCL provides a variety of services to  help ensure their success. These services range from initial recommendations to  development of content/tools/systems to ongoing support and management of content.  While BCL does not and is not licensed to provide legal advice, it has spent considerable time  working with national law firms to explore how collaborative creative spaces can exist within  U.S. copyright statutes. We work with our clients’ legal representatives to successfully blend  the necessities of copyright law with the possibilities of creative content.  Collaborative Services Overview (Summary)      Assessment/Evaluation  A typical engagement for strategic recommendations involves an assessment and evaluation  of the world narrative. BCL conducts an inventory of existing resources, legal limitations and  7
  7. 7. restrictions, and desired performance criteria. This inventory informs the specific  collaborative recommendations for the property, including how content should be  structured, identifying additional resources required for implementation, documenting legal  considerations, and identifying appropriate metrics for measuring performance of the  collaborative project.  Development  From a development standpoint, BCL can create new content, collaborative entry points, and  collaborative creative spaces. BCL can also document operational and legal  processes/procedures/policies, as well as assist with developing metric tracking systems.  Implementation  Additionally, BCL can provide on‐going support of collaborative creative spaces, including  management of content and community, integration of UGC within canonical content, and  metric reporting/recommendations. For on‐going collaborative properties, the metric  reporting becomes input for iterative improvements of the content strategy.  Collaborative Services Overview (Detailed)    8
  8. 8. The Possibilities of Collaborative Entertainment Recent advances in technology and alternative legal frameworks like Creative Commons are  providing the creative community at large with new and exciting ways to create and  distribute their content as well as engage and interact with their audiences.  Whether your focus is marketing or monetization (or something in between), there have  never been more ways to interact with audiences. Additionally, there have never been more  ways to invite audiences to engage constructively with entertainment properties.  The proliferation of distribution channels, platforms, and mediums are adding to the creative  possibilities available to content creators.  BCL helps property owners turn these possibilities into opportunities for co‐creating value.  9

×