Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

Coech4topic2slideshow

on

  • 1,434 views

For Office Procedures class to show how to create business correspondence

For Office Procedures class to show how to create business correspondence

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,434
Views on SlideShare
1,433
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
57
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.slideshare.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Coech4topic2slideshow Coech4topic2slideshow Presentation Transcript

  • BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE
    CH. 4, TOPIC 2
  • PREPARING EFFECTIVE DOCUMENTS
    Five traits of effective documents
    5 C’s of business writing
    Clear
    Concise
    Courteous
    Complete
    Correct
    Planned well and prepared carefully
  • PREPARING EFFECTIVE DOCUMENTS, CONT’D
    Preparing a document includes three stages:
    A rough draft is written
    Revised or edited as needed
    Proofread and corrected for final presentation
    Drafting – stage one
    Purpose
    Written to inform, persuade or describe
    Clear understanding of why writing the document
    Message
    Tone (writing style, manner) as important as content
  • PREPARING EFFECTIVE DOCUMENTS, CONT’D
    Points to keep in mind
    Prepare an outline
    Focus on the reader – the “you” approach
    Give message a positive tone
    Avoid negative words
    Always be courteous
    Audience
    Know certain things about the reader
    Is the document external or internal distribution
  • PREPARING EFFECTIVE DOCUMENTS, CONT’D
    Response
    How will reader use this document
    make a decision
    Gain information
    State message and response clearly
    Revising and Editing – stage two
    Process of making changes to refine the document
    Primary purpose of editing is to make certain the message is accurate and says what the writer intends
  • PREPARING EFFECTIVE DOCUMENTS, CONT’D
    Editing is polishing by making changes in response to these questions:
    Improve word choice?
    Transitions smooth, flowing logically?
    Should points order be changed?
    Inconsistencies in writing to be corrected?
    Standard proofreaders’ marks are used for editing changes that are understood by others (see p. 131 in text)
  • PREPARING EFFECTIVE DOCUMENTS, CONT’D
    Proofreading – stage three
    Careful, overall check of the document
    Verify changes in editing phase made correctly
    Check numbers/unusual spellings in original documents
    Use spell checker, then complete manual proofreading
    Spelling feature limited in identifying errors (“there” or “their” will not be detected)
  • Message Types
    Positive or Neutral Messages
    Reader not disappointed with a positive(good news or agreement) or neutral(simply relays facts – neither positive or negative) message
    Examples:
    Placing or confirming orders
    Placing request for information
    Filling or extending request for credit
  • Message Types
    Negative messages
    Involves refusal or message disappointing or upsetting to the reader
    Keep reader’s goodwill (friendly feeling or attitude)
    Examples of negative messages
    Refusing a request for an adjustment, credit
    Canceling a service
    Reporting unfavorable results
    Use indirect approach
    Begin with neutral statement
  • Message Types
    Persuasive messages (designed to convince reader)
    Influence reader to take desired action
    Sales letters, collection letters and donation letters require persuasive messages
    Collection letters require stages of persuasion
    Strong reminder stage
    Inquiry stage
    Urgency stage
  • Business Letters
    Written message to a person or an organization
    Usually written to someone outside of the company
    As letter writer, you are the company’s representative
    Your letter helps reader form an opinion about the company
  • Business Letters
    Reasons for writing business letters are:
    Requesting information or an action
    Giving information or fulfilling a request
    Being courteous or maintaining goodwill
    Explaining or stating a position
    Selling goods or services
    Presentation of business letters
    Primary purpose is to convey a message
  • Business Letters, cont’d
    Good first impression characteristics of a business letter
    Margins and spacing pleasing to the eye
    Each letter part correctly placed within the letter
    Appropriate stationery is used
    No obvious errors
    Print is neat and clear
    No smudges or fingerprints
    Make your letter as attractive as possible
  • Business Letters, cont’d
    Letter parts
    Follow a standard protocol (generally accepted customs or rules)
    Those who receive business letters expect to see them using certain letter parts
    Standard letter parts
    Printed letterhead
    Date
    Letter address
    salutation
  • Business Letters, cont’d
    Body
    Complimentary close
    Signature, printed name, and title
    Optional letter parts
    Mailing notations
    Attention line
    Subject line
    Enclosure notation
    Separate cover notation
    Copy notation
    Postscript
    Reference initials
    Multiple-page heading
  • Business Letters, cont’d
    If more than one page required
    Heading
    Name of addressee
    Word “page”
    Page number
    Letter date
    Business letter formats (arrangement or layout, as of text on the page)
    Using standard format increases efficiency for writer and recipient
  • Business Letters, cont’d
    Block
    All lines begin at left margin
    Paragraphs are NOT indented
    Modified
    Date, complimentary close and signature block (writer’s signature, typed name, and title) begin at horizontal center of page
    First line of paragraph may be indented
  • Business Letters, cont’d
    Punctuation styles
    Open
    No punctuation used after the salutation or the complimentary close
    Mixed
    Colon placed after salutation
    Comma placed after the complimentary close
  • Business Letters, cont’d
    Repetitive letters
    Letters used over and over again
    Same letter sent to hundreds of different readers
    Standard text is called “boilerplate text”
    Custom text is called “variables”
    Special word processing feature called “mail merge” will allow writer to combine standard and variable text automatically
  • Envelopes
    Most letters sent outside the company
    Require an envelope for mailing
    Reader forms opinion of document when viewing the envelope
    Envelope must be of proper size and material acceptable to the USPS (United States Postal Service)
    Envelopes include the following information:
    Recipient’s name and address
    Sender’s return address
    Special addressee notation
    Special mailing notation
  • Envelopes, cont’d
    USPS format
    Use all capital letters in the address
    Omit punctuation except for hyphen in zip code
    No numbers or attention line should appear at top of address
    Special mailing notation below the stamp area
    Special addressee notation (ex. Confidential) below the return address
  • Memos
    Informal document used within an organization
    More formally called a memorandum
    Useful for giving same information to several people
    Can give instructions or explain procedures
    Can be created using a memo template or wizard in word processing software
    Standard parts of a memo
    Heading (TO, FROM, DATE, SUBJECT)
    Body
    Optional parts
    Copy notation
    Enclosure notation
  • Memos, cont’d
    If recipient nearby, can be placed in person’s inbasket or mailbox
    If different location, sent in an interoffice envelope
    If confidential, place in envelope and mark Confidential
    If prepared well, recipient forms a positive image of you as an employee
  • Email
    Message sent electronically
    Users connected to internet send and receive messages all over the world
    Workers use email for routine messages with people inside and outside of the company
    Email is appropriate for short, informal correspondence
    Files containing more information may be attached
  • Email, cont’d
    Inexpensive, fast and easy to use
    However, emails are recorded (they may be viewed by people other than the original recipient)
    May be read by employer or coworkers
    NEVER write an email message that you would not want other employees or your supervisor to read
  • Email, cont’d
    Addresses
    Be careful when recording an email address
    Case sensitive
    If written incorrectly, will not be delivered to the intended address
    Features
    Headings
    Section for the body
  • Improving Communications in Organizations
    Memos and email most commonly used written messages within an organization
    Memos should be used to provide confidential information
    Email appropriate for many short, in-house messages
    Both should be written clearly and concisely
  • Improving Communications in Organizations
    Guidelines for improving memo and email messages
    Keep message short
    Use a descriptive subject line
    Follow a logical sequence in presenting information
    Write using a positive tone
    When communicating online, observe proper netiquette (guidelines for proper online behavior)
    Honor others’ rights of privacy
  • Desktop Publishing
    Product brochures, newsletters, and flyers use a unique format and design different from business letters
    They use fancy fonts (style of design for type characters)
    They use graphics (clipart, photos or other images)
  • Desktop Publishing
    Guidelines
    Use consistency in design
    Use ample “white space” (area of page with no text)
    Create pleasing balance of elements (headings, body text, images)
    Create contrast in design by placing different objects next to each other
    Include artwork or photos relevant to the message
    Use fonts that are easy to read
    Use all capitals sparingly
    Avoid widow lines (lines left alone)
    Avoid large horizontal spaces between words