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The Drivers for Technology EnhancedLearning in Higher EducationBen Scobleb.scoble@staffs.ac.uk@benscoble                  ...
“One of the most disruptive and transformativeinnovations we have ever witnessed.”Nigel Shadbot, HEFCE/NUS, 2010[Slide 2] ...
Internet communications technology adoption  Gartner’s ‘Hype Cycle’[Slide 3] - The Hype Cycle                             ...
77% UK Households with Internet access[Slide 4] - A Connected SocietyThese statistics indicate that we are a connected soc...
What the UK population is doing online[Slide 5] - What We Are Doing OnlineWhat we are doing is from 2010/11These statistic...
[Slide 6] - Education Shares Common Foundations                              “The internet and the educational“The interne...
Institutional Drivers, UCISA, 2010 1. Enhancing the quality of learning and teaching 2. Meeting student expectations 3. Im...
[Slide 8] – 1st Key Driver: Enhancing the quality of learning and teaching“This is not an automated version of what we can...
“Students want academic staff to[Slide 9] – Student Views of TEL                                   develop their teaching ...
“ primary driver for technology[Slide 10] - 2nd Key Driver: Meeting student expectations“primary driver for technology enh...
[Slide 11] – Provision of centrally supported tools    Provision of Technology Enhanced Learning tools    High on the list...
“…wireless access to the network by   [Slide 12] 3rd Key Driver: Improving access to learning for students off campus   (i...
[Slide 13] – 4th Key Driver: Access to Library and learningresources“Forty-three per cent of prospective HE students prefe...
[Slide 14] - NUS Charter on ‘Technology in Higher Education’NUS Charter on ‘Technology in Higher Education’ is an importan...
[Slide 15] Digital Literacy   “Digital literacy can be incorporated into the student experience as an aspect of   professi...
[Slide 16] - Technology improving the learning process  “Is the institution defining IT literacy based on todays tools (wo...
[Slide 17] - Future drivers“…research indicates that data-driven decision-making improves organizational output andproduct...
Meeting student[Slide 18] End slide                                                    Improving access to           expec...
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Drivers for Technology Enhanced Learning in Higher Education 2012

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The Drivers for Technology Enhanced Learning in Higher Education (10mins)

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[Slide 2] - Disruptive Technology
http://www.hefce.ac.uk/media/hefce/content/pubs/2010/rd1810/rd18_10.pdf

[Slide 3] - The Hype Cycle
Image source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gartner_Hype_Cycle.svg

[Slide 4] - A Connected Society
http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/rdit2/internet-access---households-and-individuals/2011/stb-internet-access-2011.html

[Slide 5] - What We Are Doing Online
http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/rdit2/internet-access---households-and-individuals/2011/stb-internet-access-2011.html
http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/resources/library/BBC/MEDIA_CENTRE/TeleScope_report.pdf

[Slide 6] - Education Shares Common Foundations
Quote source: Sue Watling ‘Technology Enhanced Learning: A New Digital Divide’, 2009, in Bell, Les (Editor); Stevenson, Howard (Editor); Neary, Michael (Editor).
Future of Higher Education : Policy, Pedagogy and the Student Experience.
London, GBR: Continuum International Publishing, 2009. p 108.

[Slide 7] - Institutional Perspectives on the Drivers
http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/~/media/groups/ssg/surveys/TEL%20survey%202010_FINAL

[Slide 8] – 1st Key Driver: Enhancing the quality of learning and teaching
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/effectivepracticedigitalage.pdf

[Slide 9] – Student Views of TEL
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Documents/Student-Experience-Research-2012-Part-1.pdf

[Slide 10] - 2nd Key Driver: Meeting student expectations
http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/~/media/groups/ssg/surveys/TEL%20survey%202010_FINAL

[Slide 11] – Provision of centrally supported tools
http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/~/media/groups/ssg/surveys/TEL%20survey%202010_FINAL

[Slide 12] 3rd Key Driver: Improving access to learning for students off campus (inc. part-time).
http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERB0207.pdf

[Slide 13] – 4th Key Driver: Access to Library and learning resources
http://www.nusconnect.org.uk/news/article/6010/2489/

[Slide 14] - NUS Charter on ‘Technology in Higher Education’
http://www.nusconnect.org.uk/news/article/6010/2489/

[Slide 15] Digital Literacy
http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/briefingpaper/2011/JISC_SLIDA_FINAL_web.pdf

[Slide 16] - Technology improving the learning process
http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/myth-about-student-competency

[Slide 17] - Future drivers
http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/penetrating-fog-analytics-learning-and-education

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  • Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Quote: Student perspectives on technology – demand, perceptions and training needs Report to HEFCE by NUS, 2010 http://www.hefce.ac.uk/media/hefce/content/pubs/2010/rd1810/rd18_10.pdf Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Image source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gartner_Hype_Cycle.svg
  • Data Source: Internet Access - Households and Individuals - Tables, 2011 (Excel sheet 156Kb) Office for National Statistics http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/rdit2/internet-access---households-and-individuals/2011/stb-internet-access-2011.html Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Data Source: Table 4: Internet activities by age group and sex, 2011 Office for National Statistics http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/rdit2/internet-access---households-and-individuals/2011/stb-internet-access-2011.html Data Source: *TeleScope: A focus on the nation’s viewing habits from TV Licensing, 2010 http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/resources/library/BBC/MEDIA_CENTRE/TeleScope_report.pdf
  • Quote source: Sue Watling ‘Technology Enhanced Learning: A New Digital Divide’, 2009 in Bell, Les (Editor); Stevenson, Howard (Editor); Neary, Michael (Editor). Future of Higher Education : Policy, Pedagogy and the Student Experience. London, GBR: Continuum International Publishing, 2009. p 108. Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Information source: UCISA Survey of Technology Enhanced Learning for higher education in the UK, 2010 http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/~/media/groups/ssg/surveys/TEL%20survey%202010_FINAL Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Quote source: JISC Effective Practice in a Digital Age, 2010 http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/effectivepracticedigitalage.pdf Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Quote source: NUS Student Experience Research, 2012 http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Documents/Student-Experience-Research-2012-Part-1.pdf Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Quote source: UCISA Survey of Technology Enhanced Learning for higher education in the UK, 2010 http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/~/media/groups/ssg/surveys/TEL%20survey%202010_FINAL Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Data source: UCISA 2010 Survey of Technology Enhanced Learning for higher education in the UK http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/~/media/groups/ssg/surveys/TEL%20survey%202010_FINAL Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Quote source: Raymond Boggs and Paul Arabasz, 2002 The Move to Wireless Networking in Higher Education http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERB0207.pdf Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Quote source: NUS charter on Technology in Higher Education http://www.nusconnect.org.uk/news/article/6010/2489/ Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Image source: NUS charter on Technology in Higher Education http://www.nusconnect.org.uk/news/article/6010/2489/
  • Quote source: JISC Supporting Learners in a Digital Age Briefing paper, September 2011 http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/briefingpaper/2011/JISC_SLIDA_FINAL_web.pdf Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Quote source: Diana G. Oblinger and Brian L. Hawkins, 2006, ‘ The Myth about Student Competency: Our Students Are Technologically Competent’ http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/myth-about-student-competency Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Quote source: Phillip D. Long and George Siemens, 2011 Penetrating the Fog: Analytics in Learning and Education http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/penetrating-fog-analytics-learning-and-education Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Image source: Microsoft Clipart http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/
  • Transcript of "Drivers for Technology Enhanced Learning in Higher Education 2012"

    1. 1. The Drivers for Technology EnhancedLearning in Higher EducationBen Scobleb.scoble@staffs.ac.uk@benscoble [Slide 1] - Opening Slide Opening slide
    2. 2. “One of the most disruptive and transformativeinnovations we have ever witnessed.”Nigel Shadbot, HEFCE/NUS, 2010[Slide 2] - Disruptive Technology“One of the most disruptive and transformative innovations we have ever witnessed.”Nigel Shadbot, HEFCE/NUS, 2010Quote: Student perspectives on technology – demand, perceptions and training needs.Report to HEFCE by NUS, 2010http://www.hefce.ac.uk/media/hefce/content/pubs/2010/rd1810/rd18_10.pdfThis quote reflects the paradigm shift that has occurred over the last 15 years.The WWW and the Internet have been disruptive technologies, changing variousaspects of our society and how we live our daily lives.
    3. 3. Internet communications technology adoption Gartner’s ‘Hype Cycle’[Slide 3] - The Hype Cycle Are we here?Although this ‘Hype cycle’ view of technology adoption is much criticised, it does reflectan underlying principle that various internet technologies have been developed, tried,rejected or adopted by mainstream society.Some worry about technological determinism, but I like to see it as technology meetingthe hype, being useful and removing the barriers to adoption, such as cost, usability andreliability.Whilst many early adopters have embraced new ‘emerging technologies’, truly‘disruptive’ technologies are those adopted by the majority of mainstream users insociety, where the potential benefits of using the innovation have been realised andproved useful.‘Disruptive’ technologies are ultimately those innovations which change how we workand engage in society, forever.Image source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gartner_Hype_Cycle.svg
    4. 4. 77% UK Households with Internet access[Slide 4] - A Connected SocietyThese statistics indicate that we are a connected society, but also an increasingly (93% Broadband)connecting via wireless and mobile devices.Data Source: Internet Access - Households and Individuals - Tables, 2011 (Excelsheet 156Kb)Office for National Statistics 45% of the UK populationhttp://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/rdit2/internet-access---households-and-individuals/2011/stb-internet-access-2011.html connect online with mobile phone Use of WIFI hotspots doubled in 12 months Source: Office for National Statistics, 2011
    5. 5. What the UK population is doing online[Slide 5] - What We Are Doing OnlineWhat we are doing is from 2010/11These statistics identify that the digital revolution has beendisruptive. Key ‘disruptions’ that have happened as a response tothe rise of digital media and communications are;•the decline of traditional physical media industries likenewspapers, photography and music•the growth of online services, including retail, banking and utilities•the growth of new communication services like social networkingand how we access information•the growth of digital radio, film and television services, that areincreasingly online•growth of user generated media and free production tools toallows us to be creativeData Source: Table 4: Internet activities by age group and sex,2011Office for Office for National Statistics, 2011 / *tvlicensing.co.uk report, 2010 Source: National Statisticshttp://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/rdit2/internet-access---households-
    6. 6. [Slide 6] - Education Shares Common Foundations “The internet and the educational“The internet and the educational sector share common foundations of knowledgeand communication”Sue Watling, 2009Quote source: Sue Watling ‘Technology Enhanced Learning: A New Digital sector share common foundationsDivide’, 2009, in Bell, Les (Editor); Stevenson, Howard (Editor); Neary, Michael(Editor).Future of Higher Education : Policy, Pedagogy and the Student Experience. of knowledge and communication”London, GBR: Continuum International Publishing, 2009. p 108.This quote points to the idea the education will or should be disrupted by Sue Watling, 2009mainstream Internet communications, as knowledge and communication is ourbusiness.Students, particularly those 16-24, will have grown up using and living with digitaltechnology. Their experiences and expectations will be driving what theTechnology Enhanced Learning landscape will look like.The themes from research about student expectations of technology enhancedlearning will reflect technology use in wider society, almost as a ‘baseline’expectation.There is much discussion about whether new students are Digital Natives or
    7. 7. Institutional Drivers, UCISA, 2010 1. Enhancing the quality of learning and teaching 2. Meeting student expectations 3. Improving access to students off campus 4. Library and learning resources provision[Slide 7] - Institutional Perspectives on the DriversThe UCISA 2010 Survey of Technology Enhanced Learning forHigher Education in the UK identified these 4 key drivers.Information source: UCISA Survey of Technology EnhancedLearning for higher education in the UK, 2010http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/~/media/groups/ssg/surveys/TEL%20survey%202010_FINAL
    8. 8. [Slide 8] – 1st Key Driver: Enhancing the quality of learning and teaching“This is not an automated version of what we can do in face-to-face teaching, butsomething that simply could not happen any other way”JISC, 2010Quote source: JISC Effective Practice in a Digital Age, 2010http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/effectivepracticedigitalage.pdfThis quote points to Technology Enhanced Learning responding to recentcontemporary technology affordances.A key driver has been the availability of technology that can enrich or enhance thetraditional learning experience.Enhancement, through better presentation software like PowerPoint, online video,whiteboards or clickers, which either provide active participation during sessions oroffer a is quality resources post-teaching, via of what“Thishighnot an automated versionthe VLE. weEnrichment, through having services that offerbut something recording a livecan do in face-to-face teaching, something new, likesession for reliving the experience later or online discussion environments that extendthe classroom-based discussion.that simply could not happen any other way”JISC, 2010
    9. 9. “Students want academic staff to[Slide 9] – Student Views of TEL develop their teaching styles to be“Students want academic staff to develop their teaching styles to be more engaging, . more engaging, interactive andinteractive and use technology and props to make the subject more accessible andinteresting”NUS, Student Experience Research, 2012Quote source: NUS Student Experience Research, 2012 and props to make use technologyhttp://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Documents/Student-Experie the subject more accessible and interesting” NUS, Student Experience Research, 2012
    10. 10. “ primary driver for technology[Slide 10] - 2nd Key Driver: Meeting student expectations“primary driver for technology enhanced learning is to ‘meetstudents expectations” enhanced learning is to ‘meetRichard Walker, UCISA, 2010 students expectations”Quote source: UCISA Survey of Technology Enhanced Learning forhigher education in the UK, 2010http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/~/media/groups/ssg/surveys/TEL%20survey%202010_FINAL Richard Walker, UCISA, 2010Student expectations are wide ranging and varied, as studentsthemselves are a diverse group. There has been a lot researchconducted around this driver and institutions have responded byfocussing on some key areas, such as;•Developing online assessment processes that have improvedfeedback,•Better tools to help manage the learning process,•Or more online dialogic tools that enhance the learning experience.
    11. 11. [Slide 11] – Provision of centrally supported tools Provision of Technology Enhanced Learning tools High on the list is plagiarism tools, like Turnitin®UK, that can deter and spot plagiarism but also promote academic integrity. eSubmission tools are popular as these can allow students to submit work remotely and in a digital form. eAssessment tools, like automated marking of tests are popular as they can improve feedback. Blogs and Wikis reflect new affordances of Web 2.0 technologies, such as co-creation and editing, that can be used for group work, reflection or discussion. ePortfolios have been implemented to support the management of Personal Development Planning assets. Podcasting reflects a drive to enhance or enrich learning through the creation of multimedia. The last 2, although not widely centrally supported, identifies the need to support resource discovery, sharing and social learning.urce: Survey of Technology Enhanced Learning for higher education in the UK, 2010
    12. 12. “…wireless access to the network by [Slide 12] 3rd Key Driver: Improving access to learning for students off campus (inc. part-time).faculty and students has the and students has the potential to “…wireless access to the network by faculty facilitate communication inside and outside the classroom” Raymond Boggs and Paul Arabasz, 2002potential to facilitate Quote source: Raymond Boggs and Paul Arabasz, 2002, ‘The Move to Wireless Networking in Higher Education’communication inside and outside http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ERB0207.pdf One of the benefits of modern communications technology has been the opportunitythe classroom” to allow student to access their learning off campus or remotely.Raymond Boggs and technology for supporting this VLEs are a common Paul Arabasz, 2002 But increasingly the development of WIFI and mobile technologies means Technology Enhanced Learning will need to adapt to allow student to access and increasingly actively participate with, their learning in a variety of contexts.
    13. 13. [Slide 13] – 4th Key Driver: Access to Library and learningresources“Forty-three per cent of prospective HE students preferred to use acombination of both printed and electronic resources for their studies”NUS ‘Technology in Higher Education’ Charter, 2010Quote source: NUS charter on Technology in Higher Educationhttp://www.nusconnect.org.uk/news/article/6010/2489/A key driver for institutions has been improving access to Library andlearning resources. “Forty-three per cent of prospective HEDigital resources have many benefits for learning.For example using the search function in PDFs to save time finding students preferred to use acontent or the use of screencasts to revisit lectures in your own time.As indicated by the quote, there is a significant demand for a mixture combination of both printed andof resource types, and perhaps beyond traditional text. electronic resources for their studies” NUS ‘Technology in Higher Education’ Charter, 2010
    14. 14. [Slide 14] - NUS Charter on ‘Technology in Higher Education’NUS Charter on ‘Technology in Higher Education’ is an importantdocument and sets out some key areas they see as important for drivingTechnology Enhanced Learning development.For example, the need for:•Digital technologies that enhance but not replace effective practice•Technology for administration and course management.Image source: NUS charter on Technology in Higher Educationhttp://www.nusconnect.org.uk/news/article/6010/2489/
    15. 15. [Slide 15] Digital Literacy “Digital literacy can be incorporated into the student experience as an aspect of professionalism, employability, citizenship and other core values and attributes of becoming a graduate” JISC, 2011 Quote source: JISC Supporting Learners in a Digital Age Briefing paper, September 2011 http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/briefingpaper/2011/JISC_S LIDA_FINAL_web.pdf An increasingly important driver is the need to be distinctive, both for the student“Digital literacy can be incorporated into and the institution.the student experience as an aspect of Students and university leaders understand that increased fees will raise the question of value for money and the relevance of the university experience.professionalism, employability, to provide learning experiences that There is a significant driver for institutions are more authentic and can develop skills that are relevant to the world of work;citizenship and other core critical thinking, inquiry, and team working. such as digital literacy, creativity, values andattributes of in the NUS charter, equipping students with these kinds of digital As highlighted becoming a graduate” literacy skills is increasingly important so they can operate effectively in this newJISC, 2011landscape. digital
    16. 16. [Slide 16] - Technology improving the learning process “Is the institution defining IT literacy based on todays tools (word-processing programs, spreadsheets) or on the activities they enable (communication, analysis)?” Diana Oblinger and Brian Hawkins, 2006 Quote source: Diana G. Oblinger and Brian L. Hawkins, 2006, ‘The Myth about Student Competency: Our Students Are Technologically Competent’ http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/myth-about-student-competency This quote reflects then the need to focus on providing appropriate technologies for learning.“Is the institutionbenefits are for learning andbased and also for individual Identifying where the defining IT literacy teaching, subjects, is crucial for developing and driving Technology Enhanced Learning.on todays tools (word-processingprograms, spreadsheets) or on the activitiesthey enable (communication, analysis)?”Diana Oblinger and Brian Hawkins, 2006
    17. 17. [Slide 17] - Future drivers“…research indicates that data-driven decision-making improves organizational output andproductivity”Phillip D. Long and George Siemens, 2011Quote source: Phillip D. Long and George Siemens,2011, ‘Penetrating the Fog: Analytics in Learning andEducation’http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/penetrating-fog-analytics-learning-and-educationThis quote highlights that another key driver is thecollecting and using of data available to universities. “…research indicates that data-drivenThis data will be supporting the themes and issuesidentified in the previous slides and is key to thefollowing new developments: decision-making improves•Improved services that support the learning process, organizational output and productivity”such as Learning analytics, new assessmentpractices and resource discovery - that areincreasingly digital.• Phillip D. Long and George Siemens, 2011
    18. 18. Meeting student[Slide 18] End slide Improving access to  expectations students off campus4 main drivers of Technology Enhanced Learning at institutions, but there are manymore identified in the UCISA report.Identifying which are key maybe down to individual institutions identifying which areimportant for them and reflecting these in their own strategies, policies and 5 yearplans. Library and learning Enhancing the quality of resource provision learning and teaching
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