StorytellingSoundAssessment

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  • People tell stories to figure out what life experiences mean. Narrative thought is a theory about the kind of thinking that goes on I a persons mind as they tell stories to figure out what life experiences mean.
  • SO to recap, the teacher told a story to engage the children, which concluded with a pre-assessment question. The children are asked to develop a story prior to the unit to determine their understanding about science storytelling.
  • Here is one groups storytelling, video plays as the audience watches children and reads text
  • The students’ story is a level 2 while their science ideas are a level 1
  • This is the first FOSS adapted science inquiry activity
  • This is the first storytelling told after the inquiry activity
  • Here is the rubric to score the second storytelling. The children’s narrative abilities stays at a level 2, but the science ideas incorporated into the story has increased to a level 2
  • This is the second FOSS adapted inquiry
  • This is the second storytelling after the second inquiry activity
  • The rubric indicates that the children’s story remains at a level 2, but the science ideas incorporated into the storytelling increased to a level 3
  • This is the third inquiry adapted from FOSS 3 and 4
  • This is the children’s third and final storytelling after the third inquiry
  • The rubric indicates that the children’s story remains at a level 2, but the science ideas in the story are a level 4
  • The rubric to score science, is continually modified from the children’s work to make the specific descriptions more accurately reflect the developmental ages and learning styles of your children.
  • StorytellingSoundAssessment

    1. 1. Science Storytelling and Assessing Jo Anne Ollerenshaw, Ph.D.
    2. 2. This Session will: <ul><li>Explain a strategy for assessing students science knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate the use of storytelling to asses 4th graders understanding of physics of sound science concepts. </li></ul><ul><li>Score the stories for children’s application of the science concepts. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide an opportunity for Reflective Discussion in order to identify application into classroom practice. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Science Storytelling <ul><li>narratives told orally </li></ul><ul><li>to recall and coordinate a sequence of events </li></ul><ul><li>to describe experiences from a familiar activity </li></ul><ul><li>about people </li></ul><ul><li>in a setting </li></ul><ul><li>doing something, e.g, identifying a problem </li></ul><ul><li>for a purpose, e.g., solving a problem using science ideas </li></ul>
    4. 4. Your thoughts, Please: Sequence your plan or method to assess students’ (science) knowledge.
    5. 5. Purposeful application of the science concept. <ul><li>National Science Education (1995) Physical Science K-4 Content Standard (p.127) </li></ul><ul><li>PROPERTIES and POSITION of OBJECTS and MATERIALS </li></ul><ul><li>Objects have many observable properties , including size, weight, shape , color, temperature, and the ability to react with other substances. Those properties can be measured using tools, such as rulers, balances, and thermometers. </li></ul><ul><li>Objects are made of one or more materials, such as paper, wood, and metal. </li></ul><ul><li>Objects can be described by the properties of the materials from which they are made, and those properties can be used to separate or sort a group of objects or materials. </li></ul><ul><li>Sound is produced by vibrating objects. </li></ul><ul><li>The pitch of sound can be varied by changing the rate of vibration . </li></ul>
    6. 6. TEKS <ul><li>(8.7) Science concepts. </li></ul><ul><li>The student knows that there is a relationship between force and motion. </li></ul><ul><li>The student is expected to: </li></ul><ul><li>(B) recognize that waves are generated and can travel through different media. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Re-write the concept as a measurable broad objective. Popham, W. J. (1999) Classroom Assessment: what teachers need to know , 2nd edition, p. 88. <ul><li>A conceptual statement for </li></ul><ul><li>teaching, learning, and assessing: </li></ul><ul><li>Different properties of objects, </li></ul><ul><li>when acted upon, </li></ul><ul><li>have different sound characteristics. </li></ul><ul><li>The action produces vibrations; when the vibrations stop, the sound stops. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Narrative Thought Yussen & Oscan (1997) The Development of Knowledge About Narratives. Issues in Educational Psychology: Contributions from Educational Psychology. V 2, 1, p.1-68. <ul><li>“any cognitive action: </li></ul><ul><li>reflecting, imagining, writing, telling … </li></ul><ul><li>about people in a setting doing something for a purpose.” </li></ul>
    9. 9. The Learning Cycle <ul><li>Engage: </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher’s storytelling </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-assessment question </li></ul><ul><li>Children’s pre-unit storytelling </li></ul><ul><li>Cycle continues through 2 more inquiry activities. [Total 4 storytelling = 4] </li></ul>
    10. 10. Storytelling in the Engage Phase is an “ Advance Organizer” <ul><li>Bridges past knowledge with present knowledge acquisition. </li></ul><ul><li>Ausubel, D. P. (1960). The use of Advance organizers in the learning and retention of meaningful verbal learning. Journal of Educational Psychology , 51, p. 267-272. </li></ul><ul><li>Provides the introductory example needed for higher-order thinking assessments. </li></ul><ul><li>Nitko, A. J. (1996) Educational Assessment of Students , 2nd edition, p. 213. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Engage Phase-Teacher’s Storytelling
    12. 12. Pre-story: Mischa, Rafa, Teo and Egan <ul><li>One day Tia the dog was out in his front yard. As he walked, his big brother went to go and play with his friends. “We’re going to a party.” “Hey, what’s this?” “We’re going to the party right now.” Tia got jealous and wanted to go find out what his big brother was doing. “Look at me.” (Scuffling sounds, no dialogue) They were digging bones. (They put the bones in their mouths.) [ pause ] ... “That’s about as far as we got.” </li></ul>
    13. 13. Science Storytelling Conceptual Rubric Complete and accurate understanding , & may provide new insights or applications 4 Accurate understanding 3 Misconceptions or an incomplete understanding 2 Students use no physical sound science ideas. Little or no apparent understanding 1 Science Storytelling specific descriptions Score level description Score Level Criteria: Different properties of objects, when acted upon, have different sound characteristics. The action produces vibrations; when the vibrations stop, the sound stops.
    14. 14. Inquiry 1 <ul><li>Children developed communication codes by comparing and contrasting the sounds made by different objects when dropped onto a hard surface (FOSS 1). </li></ul>
    15. 15. First story: Mischa, Rafa, Teo and Egan <ul><li>One day in the rain forest, two baboons we picking bananas when suddenly all the bananas were all gone. “No more bananas,” they cried. (Crying sounds). Suddenly they remembered something that they had done a long time ago. “Remember that code that we made with the elephants.” “Oh yeah. Okay, let’s throw some coconuts off the trees.” “Okay.” So they started throwing the coconuts. [Sound effects of coconuts flying in the air and hitting the ground.] The elephants heard it. “Do you hear something ?” “I don’t know. What is that?” “Sounds like the code that we made up a long time ago.” “I don’t know. Hmmmm, let’s go find out.” So they started walking towards the river. “Hey, look. The baboons.” The baboons started jumping with joy. “What do you need baboons?” “We need more bananas.” “Um, should we pick bananas?” “Yes.” “I don’t know.” “I think we should.” So they started picking bananas. “Think we have enough?” So they walked back to the river. “Is this enough baboons?” “Yes.” “Okay.” So the elephants walked across the river. Once again the baboons started jumping with joy. “Here you go, baboons.” “Thank you.” And they lived happily ever after with their bananas. </li></ul>
    16. 16. Science Storytelling Conceptual Rubric Complete and accurate understanding , & may provide new insights or applications 4 Accurate understanding 3 Characters remember code activity, but the coconut sounds only attract attention, not used for communication codes. Misconceptions or an incomplete understanding 2 Little or no apparent understanding 1 Science Storytelling specific descriptions Score level description Score Level Criteria: Different properties of objects, when acted upon, have different sound characteristics. The action produces vibrations; when the vibrations stop, the sound stops.
    17. 17. Inquiry 2 <ul><li>Using instruments to enhance their observations, children observed, recorded, and interpreted data from comparing and identifying which sounds heard through solids, liquids, and gasses were louder or easier to hear (FOSS 2). </li></ul>
    18. 18. Second story: Mischa, Rafa, Teo and Egan <ul><li>One day two baboons were working on a bridge. They finally finished. They wanted to test out the bridge to see if it was strong enough to hold them. They heard a crack. (Cracking sound effects) “Uh-oh, what’s that?” “Help, I can’t swim.” “I can’t swim.” The elephants were drinking water and their ears were in [the water ]. They thought they heard something. “Did you hear something?” “I don’t know.” “Sounds like the baboons.” “Yeah, it does.” “ Remember in science when Monkey’s uncle told us that you can hear stuff under water better than you can in the air ? So let’s go underwater and yell .” “Oooo-he-oooooo-lpp.” “It is the baboons.” “Yes, it is.” So the elephants tried to save the baboons. “Here they come, floating down the stream.” “You saved us” [shouted the baboons]. “Thanks!” </li></ul>
    19. 19. Science Storytelling Conceptual Rubric Complete and accurate understanding , & may provide new insights or applications 4 You can hear sounds under water better than you can in the air. Accurate understanding 3 Misconceptions or an incomplete understanding 2 Little or no apparent understanding 1 Science Storytelling specific descriptions Score level description Score Level Criteria: Different properties of objects, when acted upon, have different sound characteristics. The action produces vibrations; when the vibrations stop, the sound stops.
    20. 20. Inquiry 3 - <ul><li>Children described how vibrations produce sounds ; when the vibration stops the sound stops. They explained how changing the [ property of the object] levels of water in bottles, or changing the tension and length of objects changes the pitch (FOSS 3). </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge: to design a way for more than one person to listen from a long distance (FOSS 4). </li></ul>
    21. 21. Final story: Mischa, Rafa, Teo and Egan <ul><li>One day in the jungle two baboons were playing their instruments. Eoooo-ooooo-uuuuu. Suddenly one of them had a question. “How can we get the elephant across the big river to hear us?” “We could get some coconuts and hollow them out and make phones .” “Okay, let’s go get some coconuts.” [Whack, whack, whack sound effects]. One of them went gather vines. “Hello.” “Hello.” “Hello.” “Hello.” “Okay, I’m going to go across the big river and jump over our bridge that we made.” “Okay, bye.” “Here elephant it’s to talk.” “No, hold it near your ear when I talk then switch.” “Hello.” “Hello.” “Hello.” “Hello.” “Okay, do you want to hear a concert now?” “Yes.” [Baboon went back across the river.] “Ok, let’s cross it [the vine/wire] over this way, put it on the sax [and base], now let’s play .” Do-dee-doo-de-do, Do-dee-doo-de-do, Do - dee - doo - de-do. [They stop blowing into the sax and strumming the strings.] “That’s the end [of the concert]. “Good job” [Baboons]. </li></ul>
    22. 22. Science Storytelling Conceptual Rubric Coconut phone attached to sax and base, vine wires crossed, allowed elephants across the river to hear the concert. They demonstrated playing different keys along the length of the sax and different length of base’s strings to produce different pitches. When the blowing and strumming stops the concert stops. Complete and accurate understanding , & may provide new insights or applications 4 Accurate understanding 3 Misconceptions or an incomplete understanding 2 Little or no apparent understanding 1 Science storytelling specific descriptions Score level description Score Level Criteria: Different properties of objects, when acted upon, have different sound characteristics. The action produces vibrations; when the vibrations stop, the sound stops.
    23. 23. Science Storytelling Conceptual Rubric Coconut phone attached to sax and base, vine wires crossed, allowed elephants across the river to hear the concert. They demonstrated playing different keys along the length of the sax and different length of base’s strings to produce different pitches. When the blowing and strumming stops the concert [sounds] stops. The student demonstrates a complete and accurate understanding of sound and communication, and may provide new insights or applications 4 You can hear sounds under water better than you can in the air. The student demonstrates an accurate understanding of the important concepts and generalizations about sound and communication. 3 Characters remember code activity, but the coconut sounds only attract attention, not used for communication codes. The student demonstrates an misconceptions or incomplete understanding of the important concepts and generalizations about sound and communication. 2 No science ideas evident The student demonstrates Little or no apparent understanding about the important concepts and generalizations about sound and communication. 1 Science Storytelling specific description Score level description Score Level Criteria: Different properties of objects, when acted upon, have different sound characteristics. The action produces vibrations; when the vibrations stop, the sound stops.
    24. 24. Please, provide your current thoughts: Sequence your plan or method to assess students’ (science) knowledge, in light of today’s activity.

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