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Resourcing the curriculum

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This workshop considers the priorities facing teacher librarians and school leadership teams in ensuring learners and teachers are supported by appropriate selection, organisation and access to …

This workshop considers the priorities facing teacher librarians and school leadership teams in ensuring learners and teachers are supported by appropriate selection, organisation and access to curriculum resources at the school level. It looks at a range of recent sources relevant to the Australian curriculum, with particular emphasis is on e-resources.

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  • Resourcing the curriculum This presentationconsiders resourcing the curriculum and considers what priorities face teacher librarians and school leadership teams in ensuring learners and teachers are supported in their learning by appropriate selection, organisation and access to curriculum resources at the school level.This session is not about the Australian curriculum as such.You can find an article from 2010 in which I critique some issues with the resourcing of the Australian Curriculum that I think teacher librarians and school leaders need to consider. It is available in full text online on the School Library Association of Victoria FYI website at: www.slav.schools.net.au/fyi/fyiarticles.htm
  • PD days like today are good for many things, and one of those is that every now and then it is worth ‘getting in the helicopter’.The pace of change has been such that there has been no time for systematic research into the efficacy of different models of publishing, collecting and resourcing curriculum and how they contribute to learning. Teacher librarians face the challenge of keeping abreast of these issues, understanding the ramifications of rapid change and making the best choices for their community. They also face the challenge of educating their community about the complexity of the current situation and of working with administrators, learners, teachers, publishers, funders and system providers to ensure delivery of optimal school library collections and associated services.
  • So just spend a few minutes thinking about these questions for your self, and then sharing with the person next to you.Just go with what comes instantly to mind. New Curriculum, Digital resources,Ebooks, Apps, Other resources
  • Hopefully we will touch on some of those big issues and predictions in the course of this presentation. Getting back to our helicopter view, looking ahead to the role of the school library, how do you feel our guidelines document Learning for the Future 2001, stands up 12 years later? Is this statement still relevant? Do you think everyone in your school community thinks this?The curriculum is resourced through 'a collection of learning resources' - just hold this part of the definition in your mind.Learning for the Future, 2nd edition 2001 p. 25 http://www.curriculumpress.edu.au/main/goproduct/12405
  • and also through... connections to the wider library world.How well do we do this as school libraries?Learning for the Future, 2nd edition 2001 p. 25 http://www.curriculumpress.edu.au/main/goproduct/12405
  • So in our half hour of questioning everything, and looking forward a few years, our role statement in resourcing the curriculum revolves around “a collection of learning resources and equipment” – note the equipment.Are teachers and students going to require learning resources? I see many heads nodding. Anyone wish to offer a view of an alternative form of learning where learning resources become irrelevant and we rid schools and universities of them?What form are these learning resources going to take is our next question.
  • Downes, S 2003, Resource profiles, Stephen’s Web, http://www.downes.ca/files/resource_profiles.htm
  • To consider why school library collections are important it is useful to first ask a question about the role and purpose of the school library.Without a clear and shared understanding of why the library exists it is difficult to articulate the rationale for a balanced, professionally selected and managed collection. School libraries differ from academic, public and special libraries in several key aspects. In the P-12 context currently we serve learners who are under compulsion to be part of the learning community, who in almost all cases are learning in a face to face environment, and who have particular literacy needs. Unlike the requirement in a distance education learning situation for all learning materials to be available in digital form, schools have the luxury of providing a richer range of learning activities and resources that are multisensory. Face to face time is precious; the most valuable form of learning when done well, and our aim should be to support an ideal of blended learning that incorporates the best that the physical and digital worlds can provide. The same applies to school libraries - to provide the best of all worlds, a blended environment to support learning. Some of the key arguments for the school library collection revolve around the following aspects of a school library programme.
  • "A thriving national and global culture, economy and democracy will best be advanced by people who are empowered in all walks of life to seek, evaluate, use and create information effectively to achieve their personal, social, occupational and educational goals."ALIA Statement on Information literacy for all Australians (2006)The school library is a key agent in ensuring that young people have access to information, know how to find the information they need and know how to interrogate that information for effective use. A school library collection contains resources that directly support teachers and learners in the formation of an information literate community of critical thinkers.
  • "To become lifelong readers, students must have access to current, quality, high-interest, and extensive collections of books and other print materials in their school libraries, classrooms, and public libraries."School libraries work! 2008Time spent reading is key to the mastery of reading, and school libraries have always been about providing a wide range of material that is both worth reading and developmentally matched to the learning community. Whether the learner chooses to practise their reading through fiction, nonfiction, newspapers, magazines or through role-playing games - and regardless of the format of the resources - one goal of the school library collection is to provide a critical mass of content that provides choice and challenge.
  • The school library exists to maximise access and to facilitate sharing of resources across the whole school. There are obvious economies of scale in maximising the number of people using a resource that the school has invested time and funds in providing for use. Library collections exist to provide equitable access to a greater quantity and often quality of resources than individual users can afford or justify for their own personal collections. Centralised purchasing and organisation via a well-managed school library collection is the best way to ensure that all school resources are available on an equitable basis to all members of the school community. The library is a whole-of-school service and balances the needs and demands of that community so that certain school resources do not become controlled by a few.Learning for the Future (2nd ed, 2002, p. 25) outlines how to measure whether a school is effectively resourced.every student has equitable access to a variety of quality, relevant, accurate and current information resources;the students' personal growth is supported by resources that meet their development needs and interests;the teachers' effectiveness is enhanced by access to recent curriculum and professional development materials.Collections also build over time to provide a richer and deeper range of resources for the community than would be available for purchase at a particular point in time. While school libraries have less of an archival and preservation role than other collecting organisations, there remains a stewardship component to its work.
  • EfficiencyQuality and quantity of resources that individuals cannot afford or justifyPurchased once, used many timesManaged for efficient location and retrieval
  • The school library collection must also be a key source of resources relevant to, and needed for, the curriculum. The curriculum can be seen as a broad term encompassing the teaching programs, philosophy, values and teaching and learning approaches employed within the school as well as curriculum documents set by the overarching educational authority and followed by the school. The collection cannot afford to be an eclectic gathering of interesting resources that may be useful. The collection must specifically relate to and have its strengths in areas where the chosen resources will be actively employed in teaching and learning.Resourcing a new curriculum is a challenge facing most Australian school libraries as transition to an Australian Curriculum is underway.If a school library collection does not clearly relate to and effectively and specifically resource the curriculum within the school, then why have a school library collection? This is an important question. Where there is not a clear, acknowledged answer in favour of the collection, then the consequences may include:reduced funding to the librarydevelopment of separate resource collections in other parts of the school, andthe teacher librarian being increasingly used in a variety of teaching roles unrelated to the collection.As the person to whom the Principal delegates responsibility for the library collection, teacher librarians need to develop clear justification and evidence of the value of the collection, and be ready to articulate and debate these arguments on a regular basis.
  • Curation is becoming a key collection concept. It is an umbrella term encompassing the range of ‘traditional’ collection management tasks.There is another whole workshop on content and collection curation.Lots of other words that could be used here but I think these are some to start withPlannedLivingUsedCommunityOrganisedAccessibleValuedSelectedCataloguedWeeded
  • Curriculum resourcing Check out one of the recently released Australian Curriculum-aligned digital resourcesEvaluate this resource (or part thereof) according to your school's collection policy.Using the 5 steps of collection management above consider how you would include such a resource in your school's collection?What are the issues?ABC Splash splash.abc.net.au AC History units achistoryunits.edu.auAsia Education  asiaeducation.edu.au/curriculum_resourcesASTA Scienceweb scienceweb.asta.edu.auAustralian Screen  aso.gov.au/educationEnglish for AC e4ac.edu.au GeogSpacegeogspace.edu.au
  • These resources are also discoverable through Scootle – search by title once you are logged in.Many teachers also find it useful to search Scootle using: Find by Australian Curriculum tab
  • If the school has invested in a learning resource – either by paying for it, or teachers/students spending time selecting a resource – then it makes sense to preference these resources for use in the school. Ensuring digital resources and physical resources are including in the school’s library catalogue is an important role for the school library.The search engines your teachers and students use do not currently return the resources that you have in your school collection, so some kind of school-based search is required to facilitate access to school-selected resources. For most schools this crucial functionality is provided by the library management system search module (aka OPAC) which if it is to support a 21st century curriculum should be online 24/7, accessible from anywhere on any mobile device andneeds to use national educational cataloguing standards that facilitate automated linking of your local resources to Australian Curriculum.
  • The student or staff member seeking books, information and learning resources expects to do one search and for that search to return all relevant material available to them, regardless of its format or its location. This holy grail of single point of search assumes an integrated set of search results, which requires integrated metadata.
  • SCIS catalogues learning objects and websites from the Collection available in Scootle, plus commercially available and free apps, videorecordings and websites. This slide shows a search of the SCIS online catalogue for the subject term ‘E-books’. All catalogue records for e-books are assigned this subject heading, to make it easier for users to restrict searches by e-book format. There is a Special Orders option in SCISWeb that facilitates downloading of sets of digital resources.
  • As well as describing resources with SCIS subject headings, the Schools Online Thesarus (ScOT) is used as an additionalmeans of subject access.This is the thesaurus used to describe the Australian Curriculum, and the digital resources in Scootle.Downloading catalogue records from the Schools Catalogue Information Service (SCIS) service ensures that your school library catalogue is serving up standards-based metadata specifically tailored for learning resources, including using terms from the Schools Online Thesaurus (ScOT) which is the thesaurus used in the metadata driving the machine-readable Australian Curriculum and the Australian Curriculum Connect service.
  • “Jurisdictions, systems and schools will be able to implement the Australian Curriculum in ways that value teachers’ professional knowledge, reflect local contexts and take into account individual students’ family, cultural and community backgrounds. Schools and teachers determine pedagogical and other delivery considerations.” (The Shape of the Australian Curriculum 2.0, 2010, p. 10).The top priority for your school library is ensuring that your school community is well served by a locally relevant collection of resources, selected specifically for them from the limitless pool of resources that could be used to support the Australian Curriculum, as well as the wider learning goals of individuals and the school. In partnership with school leadership, teachers and students, you are best placed to know what is ‘fit for purpose’ for your school community. The History curriculum provides an ideal starting place for school libraries auditing their collections and identifying areas where local and community resources need building up. From early years onwards the History curriculum could present a challenge for schools given the value placed on implementation within a localised context. Another area identified as a concern in the consultation on the draft Australian Curriculum (Draft K-10 Curriculum Consultation Report v4, p.12) was how the curriculum will cater for students with diverse and special needs. Not surprisingly, a single document for a nation of learners as diverse as Australia cannot address the specifics of each learner’s abilities, experience and interests. Curriculum plans and resources at the school level will need to address the specific needs of their learners, and the school library has a major role to play in identifying, acquiring, managing and promoting resources to increase opportunities for independent and personalised learning.Part of supporting local curriculum needs involves valuing and managing local content and resources. It is timely to revisit the school’s collection policies toconsider what content your teachers and students create and how your school might collect and organise this content which is written specifically for yourcontext and your community?Diversity of learnershttp://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/static_20110609161813/docs/Information%20Sheet%20Diversity%20of%20learners.pdf
  • ‘Capitalise on existing investment’ and ‘don’t reinvent the wheel’ are catch cries that seem to go unheeded in many schools and jurisdictions. Other than the time teachers spend in direct contact with students, the major cost areas for education lie in curriculum planning and resourcing. When will we adequately recognise the cost of time and investment in selection, organisation and access to information both digital and physical resources? Sharing and re-using teacher-created curriculum material is an obvious strategy for reducing duplication of effort and the cost of resourcing a new curriculum.However, the evidence is that this kind of local sharing has so far been limited, with teachers producing most of the content they use themselves supplemented by a small amount of commercial externally produced material. It will be interesting to note whether the take-up of initiatives such as Scootle have any impact on the culture of sharing amongst teachers
  • All the resources in the world are no use if teachers and students don’t know they exist, aren’t alerted to their availability, or can’t readily locate them whether due to inadequate systems or inadequate skills. The library’s role is to make it easy for teachers and students to ‘find stuff ’.
  • Learning for the Future: developing information services in Australian schools, 2nd edition 2001, Education Services Australiawww.curriculumpress.edu.au/main/goproduct/12405Mitchell, P 2011 Resourcing 21st century online Australian Curriculum: the role of school libraries, FYI Autumn 2011www.slav.schools.net.au/fyi/fyiarticles.htmWall, J & Ryan, P 2010 Resourcing for curriculum innovation, Learning in a changing world series, ACER Pressbooks.google.com.au/books/about/Resourcing_for_Curriculum_Innovation.html
  • Transcript

    • 1. Resourcing the curriculum Pru Mitchell Manager, Schools Catalogue Information Service 2013
    • 2. Canberra aerial_003, 26 May 2010, Michael Renner, CC-by-nc-sa Flickr Advanced Search for Creative Commons licensed images of Canberra aerial view
    • 3. What I am proud of about my school’s collection... What will change about the collection by 2016... What are our collection priorities, issues and questions... Light bulb RichardScott33 CC-by-nc-sa
    • 4. a collection of learning resources and equipment organised, accessed and circulated through a whole of school resource management system that includes all information services. Learning for the future, 2001, p. 25
    • 5. provision of access to human and material resources and information in the wider community, eg State Library, public libraries, community information agencies and electronic resources. Learning for the future, 2001, p. 25
    • 6. Learning resources still needed? 6 How times change, 2012 ESA This material may be used, reproduced, published, communicated and adapted free of charge for non-commercial educational purposes, provided all acknowledgements are retained. Insect pinned in the field, 2010,The Australian National Insect Collection, CSIRO Entomology, 2010
    • 7. Nothing more than the fact that somebody, at some time, considers it to be a resource. Stephen Downes 2003 Resource profiles
    • 8. A thriving national and global culture, economy and democracy will best be advanced by people who are empowered in all walks of life to seek, evaluate, use and create information effectively to achieve their personal, social, occupational and educational goals. ALIA Statement on Information literacy for all Australians (2006)
    • 9. To become lifelong readers, students must have access to current, quality, high-interest, and extensive collections of books and other print materials in their school libraries, classrooms, and public libraries.
    • 10. School libraries provide equal opportunities for learning and achievement to all students. School libraries work! 2008
    • 11. • Quality and quantity of resources that individuals cannot afford or justify • Purchased once, used many times • Managed for efficient location and retrieval
    • 12. 1. selected 2. organised 3. searchable 4. maintained 5. marketed = CURATED
    • 13. ABC Splash splash.abc.net.au AC History units achistoryunits.edu.au Asia Education Foundation asiaeducation.edu.au/curriculum_resources ASTA ScienceWeb scienceweb.asta.edu.au Australian Screen aso.gov.au/education English for AC e4ac.edu.au GeogSpace geogspace.edu.au
    • 14. scootle.edu.au
    • 15. Library catalogues provide access to learning resources selected for the school community Other search engines rarely point to the learning resources your school has purchased or selected
    • 16. Users expect to search in only one place to find resources
    • 17. SCIS catalogues digital curriculum resources
    • 18. scot.esa.edu.au
    • 19. 21 Schools and teachers determine pedagogical and other delivery considerations The Shape of the Australian Curriculum 2.0, 2010, p. 10
    • 20. 22 Working nationally… offers the potential of economies of scale and a substantial reduction in the duplication of effort and resources The Shape of the Australian Curriculum 2.0, 2010, p.6
    • 21. 23 What are the search or discovery issues facing your teachers for resources - within - and beyond?
    • 22. More information SCIS updates @schoolscatinfo facebook.com/schoolscatinfo
    • 23. Learning for the Future: developing information services in Australian schools, 2nd edition 2001, Education Services Australia www.curriculumpress.edu.au/main/goproduct/12405 Mitchell, P 2011 Resourcing 21st century online Australian Curriculum: the role of school libraries, FYI Autumn 2011 www.slav.schools.net.au/fyi/fyiarticles.htm Wall, J & Ryan, P 2010 Resourcing for curriculum innovation, Learning in a changing world series, ACER Press books.google.com.au/books/about/Resourcing_for_Curriculu m_Innovation.html

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