Information Resource Description and
the Future of the Library Catalogue
Philip Hider
School of Information Studies
Charle...
Outline
 The three approaches to information resource

description
 Library catalogue trends
 The extent that the 3 app...
The three approaches
 According to Hider (2012) Information Resource Description.

Facet/ALA Editions
(1) Content-based r...
Content-based retrieval
Pros and cons
Pros

Cons

 Low costs

 Doesn’t cover non-digital material

 Very scalable

 IP issues

 Fast turn-aro...
‘Social’ metadata
Pros and cons
Pros

Cons

Low costs
Quite scalable (potentially)
Keeps up with linguistic changes
Quite interoperable
Emph...
Professional description
Pros and cons
Pros

Cons

 Reliable/trusted
 Potentially, connects user needs

 High costs

and author intentions
 Qui...
The library catalogue in 2013
 In Australia, wide range from stand-alone pre-Web interfaces to Google-like next-

generat...
One stop shop
 More and more cataloguing of e-resources
 Catalogue joined to other indexes
 Discovery layer joined to o...
Ultimately Google?
 Completely open access?
 If publically funded research?

 Still a role for collections? To support ...
Information retrieval in 2023
 Finding, identifying & obtaining supported mostly by

content-based systems
 Selecting su...
The library discovery system in 2023
 Covers all of the library’s collection
 Integrated with wider web (through e.g. li...
The cataloguing department in 2023
 Transitioned to the metadata section

 Still a specialist activity
 But working mor...
Cataloguing services (e.g. SCIS)
 Provide metadata for key resources to support curriculum,

but perhaps only controlled ...
Final prediction for 2013
 The second edition of RDA wouldn’t have been released yet
Thank you
phider@csu.edu.au
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Information resource description and the future of the library catalogue

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This presentation by Philip Hider, Head of the School of Information Studies Charles Sturt University for the SCIS Consultation 2013 outlines the three approaches to metadata creation, and considers how cataloguing services like SCIS might develop a hybrid model around these three approaches into the future.

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Information resource description and the future of the library catalogue

  1. 1. Information Resource Description and the Future of the Library Catalogue Philip Hider School of Information Studies Charles Sturt University
  2. 2. Outline  The three approaches to information resource description  Library catalogue trends  The extent that the 3 approaches support these trends  Prospects for cataloguing services in academic/school libraries (personal crystal ball)
  3. 3. The three approaches  According to Hider (2012) Information Resource Description. Facet/ALA Editions (1) Content-based retrieval a la the search engines Metadata-based retrieval (2) socially generated (end-users, authors, publishers) (3) professionally generated (cataloguers, indexers)
  4. 4. Content-based retrieval
  5. 5. Pros and cons Pros Cons  Low costs  Doesn’t cover non-digital material  Very scalable  IP issues  Fast turn-around  Less good with AV material  Interoperable  Doesn’t (much) address user needs  Supports finding, identifying and or author intentions  Doesn’t support less well-defined searching & browsing so well  Doesn’t support navigation so well obtaining fairly well  Supports well-defined and ‘precision’ searching  Relevance ranking can help with selection
  6. 6. ‘Social’ metadata
  7. 7. Pros and cons Pros Cons Low costs Quite scalable (potentially) Keeps up with linguistic changes Quite interoperable Emphasises user needs and/or author intentions  Strong on recall  Supports well-defined topical finding fairly well  Supports selecting through ratings, reviews, etc.  Covers all material potentially      (though digital material more)  Not so strong on precision  Doesn’t support less well-defined searching & browsing so well  That is, doesn’t support navigation
  8. 8. Professional description
  9. 9. Pros and cons Pros Cons  Reliable/trusted  Potentially, connects user needs  High costs and author intentions  Quite good balance of precision and recall  Supports finding, indentifying, selecting, obtaining and navigating  Particularly good for less welldefined searching and browsing  Backlogs  Not so scalable  Can be user-unfriendly  More interoperability issues  Doesn’t support ‘precision’ searching so well
  10. 10. The library catalogue in 2013  In Australia, wide range from stand-alone pre-Web interfaces to Google-like next- generation ‘discovery layers’ (Hider, forthcoming)        Single search box (one stop shop) Relevance ranking Visualisation (including ‘FRBRised’ displays) Faceted navigation Social catalogue (Tarulli, The library catalogue as social space. 2012) Personalisation Mobile catalogues  See Catalogue 2.0 : the future of the library catalogue / edited by Sally Chambers. Facet, 2013
  11. 11. One stop shop  More and more cataloguing of e-resources  Catalogue joined to other indexes  Discovery layer joined to outside information world (e.g. OCLC WorldCat Local)  Toward a Linked Data world (e.g. LC Authorities, VIAF)
  12. 12. Ultimately Google?  Completely open access?  If publically funded research?  Still a role for collections? To support particular information seeking/learning in specific environments, such as schools, university courses, etc.  Information abundance makes selection of quality/relevance ever more critical
  13. 13. Information retrieval in 2023  Finding, identifying & obtaining supported mostly by content-based systems  Selecting supported by user reviews & professional metadata  Navigation supported by controlled vocabularies
  14. 14. The library discovery system in 2023  Covers all of the library’s collection  Integrated with wider web (through e.g. linked data)  Accessible anywhere, anytime by anything  Content-based searching routine, but users appreciate metadata (especially for non-text materials)  Social tagging part of scholarly activity  Professionals support searching, tagging and manage controlled vocabularies
  15. 15. The cataloguing department in 2023  Transitioned to the metadata section  Still a specialist activity  But working more closely with other players, including IT section, liaison librarians, teacher librarians, lecturers, teachers, students  Different collections and users will still need different metadata and vocabularies
  16. 16. Cataloguing services (e.g. SCIS)  Provide metadata for key resources to support curriculum, but perhaps only controlled fields  Support tagging done by teachers and students pre-hoc and/or post-hoc  Manage or co-manage controlled vocabularies (e.g. ScOT?)
  17. 17. Final prediction for 2013  The second edition of RDA wouldn’t have been released yet
  18. 18. Thank you phider@csu.edu.au
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