Simple Machines PowerPoint

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A three part 1500+ PowerPoint slideshow from www.sciencepowerpoint.com becomes the roadmap for an interactive and amazing science experience that includes a bundled homework package, answer keys, unit notes, video links, review games, built-in quizzes and hands-on activities, worksheets, rubrics, games, and much more.
Also included are instruction to create a student version of the unit that is much like the teachers but missing the answer keys, quizzes, PowerPoint review games, hidden box challenges, owl, and surprises meant for the classroom. This is a great resource to distribute to your students and support professionals.
Text for the unit PowerPoint is presented in large print (32 font) and is placed at the top of each slide so it can seen and read from all angles of a classroom. A shade technique, as well as color coded text helps to increase student focus and allows teacher to control the pace of the lesson. Also included is a 12 page assessment / bundled homework that chronologically follows the slideshow for nightly homework and the end of the unit assessment, as well as a 8 page modified assessment. 9 pages of class notes with images are also included for students who require assistance, as well as answer keys to both of the assessments for support professionals, teachers, and homeschool parents. Many video links are provided and a slide within the slideshow cues teacher / parent when the videos are most relevant to play. Video shorts usually range from 2-7 minutes and are included in organized folders. Two PowerPoint Review games are included. Answers to the PowerPoint Review Games are provided in PowerPoint form so students can self-assess. Lastly, several class games such as guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes, and the find the hidden owl somewhere within the slideshow are provided. Difficulty rating of 8 (Ten is most difficult).
Areas of Focus: -Newton's First Law, Inertia, Friction, Four Types of Friction, Negatives and Positives of Friction, Newton's Third Law, Newton's Second Law, Potential Energy, Kinetic Energy, Mechanical Energy, Forms of Potential to Kinetic Energy, Speed, Velocity, Acceleration, Deceleration, Momentum, Work, Machines (Joules), Catapults, Trajectory, Force, Simple Machines, Pulley / (MA Mechanical Advantage), Lever /(MA),Wedge /(MA), Wheel and Axle (MA), Inclined Plane / (MA), Screw /(MA).
This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

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Simple Machines PowerPoint

  1. 1. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 6 Meters 3 meters Effort Arm (6 meters) / Resistance Arm (3 Meters) = MA 2
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Effort Arm Resistance Arm
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/
  6. 6.  Machine: Anything that helps you do work.
  7. 7.  Machine: Anything that helps you do work.  Work = Force x Distance
  8. 8. • Which of the following is not something machines do. – B.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in. ( ex. A Car jack) – C.) Machines create energy in order to complete a force. (ex. reactor) – D.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. (ex. Bicycle)
  9. 9. • Which of the following is not something machines do. – A.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. (ex. Pliers) – B.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in. ( ex. A Car jack) – C.) Machines create energy in order to complete a force. (ex. reactor) – D.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. (ex. Bicycle)
  10. 10. • Which of the following is not something machines do. – A.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. (ex. Pliers) – B.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in. ( ex. A Car jack) – C.) Machines create energy in order to complete a force. (ex. reactor) – D.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. (ex. Bicycle)
  11. 11. • Which of the following is not something machines do. – A.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. (ex. Pliers) – B.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in. ( ex. A Car jack) – C.) Machines create energy in order to complete a force. (ex. reactor) – D.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. (ex. Bicycle)
  12. 12. • Which of the following is not something machines do. – A.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. (ex. Pliers) – B.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in. ( ex. A Car jack) – C.) Machines create energy in order to complete a force. (ex. reactor) – D.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. (ex. Bicycle)
  13. 13. • Which of the following is not something machines do. – A.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. (ex. Pliers) – B.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in. ( ex. A Car jack) – C.) Machines create energy in order to complete a force. (ex. reactor) – D.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. (ex. Bicycle)
  14. 14. • Which of the following is not something machines do. – A.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. (ex. Pliers) – B.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in. ( ex. A Car jack) – C.) Machines create energy in order to complete a force. (ex. reactor) – D.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. (ex. Bicycle)
  15. 15. • Match the correct work of machines to the picture. – A.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. – B.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. – C.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in.
  16. 16. • Match the correct work of machines to the picture. – A.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. – B.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. – C.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in.
  17. 17. • Match the correct work of machines to the picture. – A.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. – B.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. – C.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in.
  18. 18. • Match the correct work of machines to the picture. – A.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. – B.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. – C.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in.
  19. 19. • Match the correct work of machines to the picture. – A.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. – B.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. – C.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in.
  20. 20. • Match the correct work of machines to the picture. – A.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. – B.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. – C.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in.
  21. 21. • Match the correct work of machines to the picture. – A.) Machines can increase the speed of the force. – B.) Machines can make the force you put into a machine greater. – C.) Machines can change the direction of the force you put in.
  22. 22. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed.
  23. 23. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  24. 24. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  25. 25. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  26. 26. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  27. 27. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  28. 28. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  29. 29. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  30. 30. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  31. 31. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  32. 32. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  33. 33. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  34. 34. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  35. 35. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  36. 36. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  37. 37. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  38. 38. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  39. 39. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  40. 40.  Efficiency: A measure of how much more work must be put into a machine than you get out of the machine.
  41. 41.  Efficiency: A measure of how much more work must be put into a machine than you get out of the machine.  The efficiency of a machine will always be less than 100%.
  42. 42. • Efficiency: A measure of how much more work must be put into a machine than you get out of the machine. – The efficiency of a machine will always be less than 100%. – If there was no friction, the best you could hope for is an efficiency of 100% meaning work in = work out.
  43. 43. • Efficiency: A measure of how much more work must be put into a machine than you get out of the machine. – The efficiency of a machine will always be less than 100%. – If there was no friction, the best you could hope for is an efficiency of 100% meaning work in = work out.
  44. 44. • Efficiency: A measure of how much more work must be put into a machine than you get out of the machine. – The efficiency of a machine will always be less than 100%. – If there was no friction, the best you could hope for is an efficiency of 100% meaning work in = work out.
  45. 45.  Force is measured in a unit called the Newton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46.  Force is measured in a unit called the Newton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47.  Force is measured in a unit called the Newton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48.  Force is measured in a unit called the Newton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49.  Force is measured in a unit called the Newton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50.  Force is measured in a unit called the Newton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51.  Force is measured in a unit called the Newton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52.  Force is measured in a unit called the Newton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53.  Force is measured in a unit called the Newton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54.  Force is measured in a unit called the Newton. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55.  One Newton is the amount of force required to give a 1 kg mass an acceleration of 1 m/s/s. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56.  One Newton is the amount of force required to give a 1 kg mass an acceleration of 1 m/s/s. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57.  One Newton is the amount of force required to give a 1 kg mass an acceleration of 1 m/s/s. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more: Force. http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/newt laws/u2l2a.cfm
  58. 58. • One Newton is the amount of force required to give a 1 kg mass an acceleration of 1 m/s/s. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. • One Newton is the amount of force required to give a 1 kg mass an acceleration of 1 m/s/s. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60.  Mass: Amount of matter in an object. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. “I’m weightless but I still have mass.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63.  New Area of focus: Simple Machines. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • Activity: Ancient use of Simple Machines. – Use PVC piping to move an upside down lab table and some people sitting on it down the hall. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • Set-up of challenge. – Move pipes from the rear to the front before the table moves. – How efficient can your group work?
  66. 66. • Please reflect upon the activity. – What type of machine was used? – Did it help? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  67. 67.  Mechanical advantage (MA): The number of times a machine multiplies your effort force. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68.  To find MA  Divide resistance force (usually weight in g) by the effort force (Newtons) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69.  To find MA  Divide resistance force (usually weight in g) by the effort force (Newton) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70.  To find MA  Divide resistance force (usually weight in g) by the effort force (Newton) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71.  To find MA  Divide resistance force (usually weight in g) by the effort force (Newton) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72.  To find MA  Divide resistance force (usually weight in g) by the effort force (Newton) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73.  To find MA  Divide resistance force (usually weight in g) by the effort force (Newton) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FO = MA
  74. 74.  To find MA  Divide resistance force (usually weight in g) by the effort force (Newton) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FO FI = MA
  75. 75. • Find the MA of the following. • The work input was 2, and the output was 18.
  76. 76. • Find the MA of the following. • The work input was 2, and the output was 18.
  77. 77. • Find the MA of the following. • The work input was 2, and the output was 18. FI FO
  78. 78. • Find the MA of the following. • The work input was 2, and the output was 18. FI FO
  79. 79. • Find the MA of the following. • The work input was 2, and the output was 18. FI FO
  80. 80. • Find the MA of the following. • The work input was 2, and the output was 18. FI FO 2 18
  81. 81. • Find the MA of the following. • The work input was 2, and the output was 18. FI FO 2 18 = 9 MA
  82. 82. • Find the MA of the following. • The work input was 2, and the output was 18. FI FO 2 18 = 9 MA Mechanical Advantage: Learn More at… http://www.wisc- online.com/objects/ViewObject.aspx?ID=ENG20504
  83. 83. 12 N 6 N
  84. 84. 12 N 6 NFO FI
  85. 85. 12 N 6 NFO FI
  86. 86. 12 N 6 NFO FI
  87. 87. 12 N 6 NFO FI 6N 12N
  88. 88. 12 N 6 NFO FI 6N 12N = 12 MA
  89. 89. 40 N 20 N
  90. 90. 40 N 20 N FO FI
  91. 91. 40 N 20 N FO FI
  92. 92. 40 N 20 N FO FI 20N 40N
  93. 93. 40 N 20 N FO FI 20N 40N = 2 MA
  94. 94. 40 N 20 N FO FI 20N 40N = 2 MA
  95. 95. 90 N 45 N
  96. 96. 90 N 45 N FO FI
  97. 97. 90 N 45 N FO FI 45N 90N
  98. 98. 90 N 45 N FO FI 45N 90N = 2 MA
  99. 99. • Law Conservation of Energy
  100. 100. • Law Conservation of Energy – Energy cannot be created or destroyed.
  101. 101. • Law Conservation of Energy – Energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Energy can be transferred.
  102. 102. • Law Conservation of Energy – Energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Energy can be transferred.
  103. 103. • Law Conservation of Energy – Energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Energy can be transferred.
  104. 104. • Video Links! Mechanical Advantage, Khan Academy, Optional (Advanced) (I,II,III) – http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/m echanics/v/introduction-to-mechanical-advantage (Part 1) – http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/m echanics/v/mechanical-advantage--part-2 (2) – http://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/m echanics/v/mechanical-advantage--part-3 (3)
  105. 105.  Simple machines: Types of machines that do work with one movement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  106. 106.  Simple machines: Types of machines that do work with one movement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  107. 107.  Simple machines: Types of machines that do work with one movement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108.  Simple machines: Types of machines that do work with one movement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109.  Simple machines: Types of machines that do work with one movement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110.  Simple machines: Types of machines that do work with one movement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111.  Simple machines: Types of machines that do work with one movement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112.  Simple machines: Types of machines that do work with one movement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  113. 113.  Simple machines: Types of machines that do work with one movement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  114. 114.  Simple machines: Types of machines that do work with one movement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  115. 115. • Simple Machines Available Sheet: Pulleys
  116. 116.  Pulley  Uses grooved wheels and a rope to raise, lower or move a load. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  117. 117.  Pulley  Uses grooved wheels and a rope to raise, lower or move a load. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  118. 118.  A pulley makes work seem easier Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  119. 119.  A pulley makes work seem easier Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  120. 120.  A pulley makes work seem easier  Changes the direction of motion to work with gravity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  121. 121.  A pulley makes work seem easier  Changes the direction of motion to work with gravity. Instead of lifting up, you can pull down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  122. 122.  A pulley makes work seem easier  Changes the direction of motion to work with gravity. Instead of lifting up, you can pull down.  Uses your body weight against the resistance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  123. 123.  The more pulleys that are used, the more the MA (Mechanical Advantage). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  124. 124.  The more pulleys that are used, the more the MA (Mechanical Advantage). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  125. 125.  MA = The number of ropes that support the pulley. The end of the rope doesn’t count.  What is the MA of this pulley system below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  126. 126. • MA = The number of ropes that support the pulley. The end of the rope doesn’t count. – What is the MA of this pulley system below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  127. 127. • MA = The number of ropes that support the pulley. The end of the rope doesn’t count. MA =2 – What is the MA of this pulley system below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  128. 128. • MA = The number of ropes that support the pulley. The end of the rope doesn’t count. MA =2 – What is the MA of this pulley system below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  129. 129. • MA = The number of ropes that support the pulley. The end of the rope doesn’t count. MA =2 – What is the MA of this pulley system below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FI =
  130. 130. • MA = The number of ropes that support the pulley. The end of the rope doesn’t count. MA =2 – What is the MA of this pulley system below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FO FI
  131. 131. • MA = The number of ropes that support the pulley. The end of the rope doesn’t count. MA =2 – What is the MA of this pulley system below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FO FI FI FO
  132. 132. • MA = The number of ropes that support the pulley. The end of the rope doesn’t count. MA =2 – What is the MA of this pulley system below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FO FI FI FO 100 kg 50 kg
  133. 133. • MA = The number of ropes that support the pulley. The end of the rope doesn’t count. MA =2 – What is the MA of this pulley system below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FO FI FI FO 100 kg 50 kg = 2 MA
  134. 134. • What is the MA of this pulley system? MA=2 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  135. 135. • Answer, the MA is 4. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  136. 136. • Answer, the MA is 4. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  137. 137. • Answer, the MA is 4. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FI FO
  138. 138. • Answer, the MA is 4. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FI FO FI FO
  139. 139. • Answer, the MA is 4. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FI FO FI FO
  140. 140. • Answer, the MA is 4. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FI FO FI FO 100 25
  141. 141. • Answer, the MA is 4. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FI FO FI FO 100 25 = 4 MA
  142. 142. • What is the MA?
  143. 143. • What is the MA?
  144. 144. • What is the MA?
  145. 145. • What is the MA?
  146. 146. • What is the MA?
  147. 147. • What is the MA?
  148. 148. • What is the MA?
  149. 149. • What is the MA?
  150. 150. • What is the MA?
  151. 151. • Pulley Simulator: (Optional) – http://www.compassproject.net/sims/pulley.html
  152. 152.  Three types of pulleys  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  153. 153.  Fixed pulley  No MA Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  154. 154.  Fixed pulley  No MA Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155.  Movable Pulley (MA of 2) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156.  Movable Pulley (MA of 2) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157.  Combined Pulley / Block and tackle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158. • Rock climbing uses pulleys. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159. • Rock climbing uses pulleys. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160. • Rock climbing uses pulleys. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161. • Sailing uses pulleys to ease difficult jobs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  162. 162. Pulleys
  163. 163. • The chain on your bicycle is a pulley.
  164. 164. • Quiz Wiz 1-10 Fixed Pulley, Moveable Pulley, Block and Tackle/Combined Pulley Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  165. 165. • * Bonus: Name this family that used simple machines to create a tree house?
  166. 166. • Answers! Quiz Wiz 1-10 Fixed Pulley, Moveable Pulley, Block and Tackle/Combined Pulley Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167. • * Bonus: Name this family that used simple machines to create a tree house?
  168. 168. • * Bonus: Name this family that used simple machines to create a tree house?
  169. 169. • Activity! Using the three types of Pulleys Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170. • Activity! Using the three types of Pulleys Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy I wonder what the MA of this pulley system is?
  171. 171. • Activity! Using the three types of Pulleys Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy I wonder what the MA of this pulley system is?
  172. 172. • Activity! Using the three types of Pulleys Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy I wonder what the MA of this pulley system is?
  173. 173. Top Pulley Bottom Pulley
  174. 174. Top Pulley Bottom Pulley
  175. 175. Top Pulley Bottom Pulley
  176. 176. Top Pulley Bottom Pulley
  177. 177. Top Pulley Bottom Pulley
  178. 178. • Simple Machines Available Sheet.
  179. 179. Please create this spreadsheet in your journal. Weight (g) newtons No Pulley ____ grams Fixed Pulley ____ grams Combined Pulley 2 ____ grams Combined Pulley 4 ____ grams Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180. • Please use the materials to do the following. –Measure the newtons required with a Spring Scale to lift the ____ grams of weight with the different pulleys described in the spreadsheet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181. • Please use the materials to do the following. –Measure the newtons required with a Spring Scale to lift the ____ grams of weight with the different pulleys described in the spreadsheet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember to zero your spring scale!
  182. 182. • Please use the materials to do the following. – Record the newtons required with a Spring Scale to lift the ____ grams of weight with a fixed pulley.
  183. 183. • Fixed Pulley System Construction
  184. 184. • Fixed Pulley System Construction
  185. 185. • Fixed Pulley System Construction
  186. 186. • Fixed Pulley System Construction
  187. 187. • Fixed Pulley System Construction
  188. 188. • Fixed Pulley System Construction
  189. 189. • Fixed Pulley System Construction
  190. 190. • Please use the materials to do the following. –Record the newtons with a combined pulley to lift the weight? Spring Scale Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  191. 191. • Two Pulley System Construction
  192. 192. • Two Pulley System Construction
  193. 193. • Two Pulley System Construction
  194. 194. • Two Pulley System Construction
  195. 195. • Two Pulley System Construction
  196. 196. • Two Pulley System Construction
  197. 197. • Two Pulley System Construction
  198. 198. • Two Pulley System Construction
  199. 199. • Please use the materials to do the following. – Record newtons with a combined pulley (4) to lift the ____ grams of weight?
  200. 200. • 4 Pulley System Construction
  201. 201. • 4 Pulley System Construction
  202. 202. • 4 Pulley System Construction Two wheels / Pulley
  203. 203. • 4 Pulley System Construction Two wheels / Pulley
  204. 204. • 4 Pulley System Construction
  205. 205. • 4 Pulley System Construction
  206. 206. • If you don’t have double pulleys, you can still use 4 single pulley’s like so. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  207. 207. • Create a moveable pulley to lower the ___ gram weight into the bucket without touching it. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  208. 208. • Questions? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a fixed pulley rather than no pulley at all? – What was the advantage in Newtons to use a combined pulley over a fixed pulley? – What was the advantage in Newtons to use a combined pulley (4) over a combined pulley (2)? – Did a moveable pulley allow you to move the load with minimal effort? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  209. 209. • Questions? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a fixed pulley rather than no pulley at all? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a combined pulley over a fixed pulley? – What was the advantage in Newtons to use a combined pulley (4) over a combined pulley (2)? – Did a moveable pulley allow you to move the load with minimal effort? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  210. 210. • Questions? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a fixed pulley rather than no pulley at all? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a combined pulley over a fixed pulley? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a combined pulley (4) over a combined pulley (2)? – Did a moveable pulley allow you to move the load with minimal effort? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  211. 211. • Questions? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a fixed pulley rather than no pulley at all? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a combined pulley over a fixed pulley? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a combined pulley (4) over a combined pulley (2)? – Did a moveable pulley allow you to move the load with minimal effort? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  212. 212. Weight (g) Newton No Pulley ___ grams 5 newtons Fixed Pulley ___ grams 5 newtons? Combined Pulley 2 ___ grams 3 newtons? Combined Pulley 4 ___ grams 1 newtons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  213. 213. • Questions? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a fixed pulley rather than no pulley at all? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  214. 214. • Questions? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a fixed pulley rather than no pulley at all? – There was no Mechanical Advantage (MA) when using the fixed pulley. It was easier because you didn’t have to bend down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  215. 215. • Questions? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a combined pulley over a fixed pulley? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  216. 216. • Questions? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a combined pulley over a fixed pulley? – The combined pulley required less force (2 newtons) to lift the load. The Mechanical Advantage was 2 newtons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  217. 217. • Questions? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a combined pulley (4) over a combined pulley (2)? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  218. 218. • Questions? – What was the advantage in newtons to use a combined pulley (4) over a combined pulley (2)? – The (MA) was 4. It only took 1 newton to lift the load compared 3 newtons with the combined 2 pulley, and 5 newtons with no pulley at all. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  219. 219. Pulleys. Learn more at… http://www.swe.org/iac/lp/pulley_03.html
  220. 220. • Questions? – Did a moveable pulley allow you to move the load with minimal effort? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  221. 221. • Questions? – Did a moveable pulley allow you to move the load with minimal effort? – The pulley moved along the rope very easily. We were able to move the load easily once it was lifted. The pulley rolled down the rope because of it’s potential energy. • Not very good for lifting. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222. • Simple Machines Available Sheet: Levers
  223. 223.  Lever -
  224. 224.  Lever A stiff bar that rests on a support called a fulcrum which lifts or moves loads.
  225. 225.  MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  226. 226.  MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  227. 227.  MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  228. 228.  MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Or…
  229. 229.  MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 120 N FI FO 360 N
  230. 230.  MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 120 N FI FO 360 N= FO FI
  231. 231.  MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 120 N FI FO 360 N= FO 360 N FI 120 N
  232. 232.  MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 120 N FI FO 360 N=3 MA FO 360 N FI 120 N
  233. 233. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 6 Meters 3 meters
  234. 234. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 6 Meters 3 meters Effort Arm (6 meters) /
  235. 235. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 6 Meters 3 meters Effort Arm (6 meters) / Resistance Arm (3 Meters)
  236. 236. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 6 Meters 3 meters Effort Arm (6 meters) / Resistance Arm (3 Meters) = MA 2
  237. 237. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 12 meters4 meters
  238. 238. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 12 meters4 meters
  239. 239. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 12 meters4 meters
  240. 240. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 12 meters4 meters 12 meters / 4 meters =
  241. 241. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 12 meters4 meters 12 meters / 4 meters = MA 3
  242. 242. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 90 N 30 N
  243. 243. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FO FI 90 N 30 N
  244. 244. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FO FI 90 N 30 N
  245. 245. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FO FI 90 N 30 N
  246. 246. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy FO FI 30 N 90 N 90 N 30 N
  247. 247. • What is the MA of this lever? – MA = length of effort arm ÷ length of resistance arm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy =3 MA FO FI 30 N 90 N 90 N 30 N
  248. 248. • Video Link! Levers and skateboarding. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72ZNEactb-k
  249. 249.  The 3 types of levers  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  250. 250.  The 3 types of levers  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  251. 251.  The 3 types of levers  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  252. 252.  The 3 types of levers  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  253. 253.  The 3 types of levers  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  254. 254. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  255. 255. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  256. 256. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  257. 257. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  258. 258. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  259. 259. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  260. 260. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  261. 261.  First Class Lever Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  262. 262. • The law of equilibrium is: The effort multiplied by its distance from the fulcrum equals the load multiplied by its distance from the fulcrum.
  263. 263. • The law of equilibrium is: The effort multiplied by its distance from the fulcrum equals the load multiplied by its distance from the fulcrum. – True or False? – 2 lbs of effort exerted 4 feet from the fulcrum will lift 8 lbs located 1 foot on the other side of fulcrum.
  264. 264. • The law of equilibrium is: The effort multiplied by its distance from the fulcrum equals the load multiplied by its distance from the fulcrum. – True or False? – 2 lbs of effort exerted 4 feet from the fulcrum will lift 8 lbs located 1 foot on the other side of fulcrum.
  265. 265. • The law of equilibrium is: The effort multiplied by its distance from the fulcrum equals the load multiplied by its distance from the fulcrum. – True or False? – 2 lbs of effort exerted 4 feet from the fulcrum will lift 8 lbs located 1 foot on the other side of fulcrum.
  266. 266. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Create a first class lever and send and toy into the air by jumping on the effort arm.
  267. 267. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Create a first class lever and send and toy into the air by jumping on the effort arm.
  268. 268. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Create a first class lever and send and toy into the air by jumping on the effort arm.
  269. 269. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Create a first class lever and send and toy into the air by jumping on the effort arm.
  270. 270. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Create a first class lever and send and toy into the air by jumping on the effort arm.
  271. 271. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  272. 272. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  273. 273. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  274. 274. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  275. 275. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  276. 276. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  277. 277. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  278. 278. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  279. 279. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  280. 280. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  281. 281. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  282. 282. • Activity! Sending a stuffed toy flying. – Change the fulcrum, Will this change how high the toy will travel.
  283. 283. • Simple Machines Available Sheet: Levers
  284. 284. • Activity! Levers – Please record the spreadsheet below in your journal. Mechanical Advantage # of newtons to lift lever Just the weight (_____grams) No MA E arm = 25cm R arm = 5cm E arm = 20cm R arm = 10cm E arm = 15cm R arm = 15cm E arm = 10cm R arm = 20cm E arm = 5cm R arm = 25cm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  285. 285. • Please set up your first class lever system as follows. – Use the centimeters on the ruler to set up lever and determine MA. Crayola Marker Ruler Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Paperclip taped
  286. 286. • Simulated data / Answers Mechanical Advantage # of newtons to lift lever Just the weight (_____ grams) No MA 3 Results will vary due to spring scales E arm = 25cm R arm = 5cm 25/5 = 5 .5 E arm = 20cm R arm = 10cm 20/10 = 2 1 E arm = 15cm R arm = 15cm 15/15 = 1 2 E arm = 10cm R arm = 20cm 10/20 = .5 4 E arm = 5cm R arm = 25cm 5/25 = .2 8 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  287. 287. Mechanical Advantage # of newtons to lift lever Just the weight (_____ grams) No MA 3 Results will vary due to spring scales E arm = 25cm R arm = 5cm 25/5 = 5 .5 E arm = 20cm R arm = 10cm 20/10 = 2 1 E arm = 15cm R arm = 15cm 15/15 = 1 2 E arm = 10cm R arm = 20cm 10/20 = .5 4 E arm = 5cm R arm = 25cm 5/25 = .2 8 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  288. 288. Mechanical Advantage # of newtons to lift lever Just the weight (_____ grams) No MA 3 Results will vary due to spring scales E arm = 25cm R arm = 5cm 25/5 = 5 .5 E arm = 20cm R arm = 10cm 20/10 = 2 1 E arm = 15cm R arm = 15cm 15/15 = 1 2 E arm = 10cm R arm = 20cm 10/20 = .5 4 E arm = 5cm R arm = 25cm 5/25 = .2 8 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Note Mechanical Disadvantage
  289. 289. • Simple Machines Available Sheet: Levers
  290. 290. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (Crayola marker) gave you the best MA or lowest number of Newtons? – Which fulcrum position (marker) gave you the least MA or negative MA or highest number of Newtons? – How does changing the fulcrums location effect the lever? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  291. 291. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (Crayola marker) gave you the best MA or lowest number of newtons? – Which fulcrum position (marker) gave you the least MA or negative MA or highest number of newtons? – How does changing the fulcrums location effect the lever? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  292. 292. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (Crayola marker) gave you the best MA or lowest number of newtons? – Which fulcrum position (marker) gave you the least MA or negative MA or highest number of newtons? – How does changing the fulcrums location effect the lever? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  293. 293. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (Crayola marker) gave you the best MA or lowest number of newtons? – Which fulcrum position (marker) gave you the least MA or negative MA or highest number of newtons? – How does changing the fulcrums location effect the lever? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  294. 294. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (Crayola marker) gave you the best MA or lowest number of newtons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  295. 295. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (Crayola marker) gave you the best MA or lowest number of newtons? – Answer: The lever had the highest Mechanical Advantage when it had a long effort arm, and short resistance arm (E=25, R=5) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  296. 296. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (Crayola marker) gave you the best MA or lowest number of newtons? – Answer: The lever had the highest Mechanical Advantage when it had a long effort arm, and short resistance arm (E=25, R=5) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  297. 297. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (Crayola marker) gave you the best MA or lowest number of newtons? – Answer: The lever had the highest Mechanical Advantage when it had a long effort arm, and short resistance arm (E=25, R=5) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  298. 298. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (marker) gave you the least MA or negative MA or highest number of newtons? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  299. 299. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (marker) gave you the least MA or negative MA or highest number of newtons? – Answer: It was most difficult (Least MA) to lift the weight with a short effort arm, and long resistance arm (E=5, R=25) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  300. 300. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (marker) gave you the least MA or negative MA or highest number of newtons? – Answer: It was most difficult (Least MA) to lift the weight with a short effort arm, and long resistance arm (E=5, R=25) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  301. 301. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – Which fulcrum position (marker) gave you the least MA or negative MA or highest number of newtons? – Answer: It was most difficult (Least MA) to lift the weight with a short effort arm, and long resistance arm (E=5, R=25) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  302. 302. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – How does changing the fulcrums location effect the lever? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  303. 303. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – How does changing the fulcrums location effect the lever? – Answer: Changing the fulcrum can increase or decrease the effort needed to lift the weight. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  304. 304. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – How does changing the fulcrums location effect the lever? – Answer: Changing the fulcrum can increase or decrease the effort needed to lift the weight. The closer the fulcrum was to the weight the easier it was to lift. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  305. 305. • Questions / Follow-up (Use data in MA or in newtons) – How does changing the fulcrums location effect the lever? – Answer: Changing the fulcrum can increase or decrease the effort needed to lift the weight. The further away the fulcrum, from the weight, the harder it was to lift. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  306. 306.  Second Class Lever Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  307. 307. • Activity! Charades, what is the common item acted out. –Hint, It’s a second class lever. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  308. 308. • Activity! Charades, what is the common item acted out. –Hint, It’s a second class lever. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  309. 309. • Answer, A wheel barrel. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  310. 310. • Second Class Lever Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  311. 311. • Simple Machines Available Sheet: Levers
  312. 312. • Please use your materials from the first class lever to construct a second class lever. – Feel the difference when you adjust the load.
  313. 313. • Please use your materials from the first class lever to construct a second class lever. – Feel the difference when you adjust the load.
  314. 314. • Please use your materials from the first class lever to construct a second class lever. – Feel the difference when you adjust the load.
  315. 315. • Please use your materials from the first class lever to construct a second class lever. – Feel the difference when you adjust the load.
  316. 316. • Please use your materials from the first class lever to construct a second class lever. – Feel the difference when you adjust the load.
  317. 317. • Please use your materials from the first class lever to construct a second class lever. – Feel the difference when you adjust the load.
  318. 318. • Please use your materials from the first class lever to construct a second class lever. – Feel the difference when you adjust the load.
  319. 319. • Please use your materials from the first class lever to construct a second class lever. – Feel the difference when you adjust the load.
  320. 320. • Please use your materials from the first class lever to construct a second class lever. – Feel the difference when you adjust the load.
  321. 321. • Activity! Second Class Lever. – Set-up your own spreadsheet and conduct your own investigation (collecting data) about second class levers.
  322. 322. • Activity! Second Class Lever. – Set-up your own spreadsheet and conduct your own investigation (collecting data) about second class levers. Be prepared to report your findings to the class.
  323. 323. • Activity! Second Class Lever. – Use the computers to set-up your spreadsheet and graph. Be prepared to report your findings to the class.
  324. 324. • Activity! Second Class Lever. – Answers (General): The (MA) increases as the load is moved closer to the fulcrum / resistance arm decreases and effort arm increases. Be prepared to report your findings to the class.
  325. 325.  Third Class Lever.  Has Mechanical Disadvantage.  Requires more force to lift the load. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  326. 326.  Third Class Lever.  Has Mechanical Disadvantage.  Requires more force to lift the load. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  327. 327.  Third Class Lever.  Has Mechanical Disadvantage.  Requires more force to lift the load. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  328. 328. Fulcrum
  329. 329. Load Fulcrum
  330. 330. Load Fulcrum Effort
  331. 331. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  332. 332. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  333. 333. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  334. 334. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  335. 335. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  336. 336. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  337. 337. • Which is a first, second, and third class lever.? – Please put your finger in the air when the square lights up.
  338. 338. • How many levers can you point out?
  339. 339. • How many levers can you point out?
  340. 340. • How many levers can you point out? Levers: Learn more at… http://www.technologys tudent.com/forcmom/le ver1.htm
  341. 341. • Video! (Optional) – 6 minutes. – Cirque du Soleil and the Lever. – What type of lever is being used? – How is the lever used to perform this act. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9OYEpC3GWI
  342. 342.  Wedge: An object with at least one slanting side ending in a sharp edge, which cuts materials apart. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  343. 343.  The mechanical advantage of a wedge can be found by dividing the length of the slope (S) by the thickness (T) of the big end.  What is the MA of the wedge below. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  344. 344.  The mechanical advantage of a wedge can be found by dividing the length of the slope (S) by the thickness (T) of the big end.  What is the MA of the wedge below? 50 cm 10 cm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  345. 345. • Answer! 50/10 = Mechanical Advantage 5 50 cm 10 cm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  346. 346. • What is the MA of this wedge? 20 cm 5 cm
  347. 347. • What is the MA of this wedge? 20 cm 5 cm 20/5 =
  348. 348. • What is the MA of this wedge? 20 cm 5 cm 20/5 = MA 4
  349. 349. • Which wedge below has the greater MA Mechanical Advantage? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  350. 350. • Which wedge below has the greater MA Mechanical Advantage? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  351. 351. • Which wedge below has the greater MA Mechanical Advantage? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  352. 352. • Which wedge below has the greater MA Mechanical Advantage? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  353. 353. • Simple Machines Available Sheet: Levers
  354. 354. • Activity! (Optional) Mechanical Advantage of a Wedge. – Please trace the wooden blocks and calculate the Mechanical Advantage of each type of wedge.
  355. 355. • Activity! (Optional) Mechanical Advantage of a Wedge. – Please trace the wooden blocks and calculate the Mechanical Advantage of each type of wedge. T S Measure the longest slope on this type of wedge/
  356. 356. • Activity! – On the next slide, your table group must find the MA of 4 different wedges in 60 seconds. – To succeed your group must be organized, precise, and methodical.
  357. 357. Simulated wooden blocks. 3 8 4 20 10 4 6 12
  358. 358. Simulated wooden blocks. 3 8 4 20 10 4 6 12
  359. 359. Simulated wooden blocks. 3 8 4 20 10 4 6 12 MA=2
  360. 360. Simulated wooden blocks. 3 8 4 20 10 4 6 12 MA=2
  361. 361. Simulated wooden blocks. 3 8 4 20 10 4 6 12 MA=2 MA = 6.66
  362. 362. Simulated wooden blocks. 3 8 4 20 10 4 6 12 MA=2 MA = 6.66
  363. 363. Simulated wooden blocks. 3 8 4 20 10 4 6 12 MA=2 MA = 6.66 MA = 2.5
  364. 364. Simulated wooden blocks. 3 8 4 20 10 4 6 12 MA=2 MA = 6.66 MA = 2.5
  365. 365. Simulated wooden blocks. 3 8 4 20 10 4 6 12 MA=2 MA = 6.66 MA = 2.5 MA = 2
  366. 366. • What is our next simple machine?
  367. 367. • What is our next simple machine?
  368. 368. Axle Wheel
  369. 369.  Wheel and Axle: A wheel with a rod, called an axle, through its center lifts or moves a load. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  370. 370.  Wheel and Axle: A wheel with a rod, called an axle, through its center lifts or moves a load. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The larger circles are the wheels.
  371. 371.  Wheel and Axle: A wheel with a rod, called an axle, through its center lifts or moves a load. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The larger circles are the wheels. The smaller circles are the axles.
  372. 372.  The mechanical advantage of a wheel and axle is the ratio of the radius of the wheel divided by the radius of the axle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  373. 373.  The mechanical advantage of a wheel and axle is the ratio of the radius of the wheel divided by the radius of the axle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  374. 374.  The mechanical advantage of a wheel and axle is the ratio of the radius of the wheel divided by the radius of the axle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  375. 375.  The mechanical advantage of a wheel and axle is the ratio of the radius of the wheel divided by the radius of the axle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  376. 376.  The mechanical advantage of a wheel and axle is the ratio of the radius of the wheel divided by the radius of the axle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  377. 377.  The mechanical advantage of a wheel and axle is the ratio of the radius of the wheel divided by the radius of the axle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  378. 378.  The mechanical advantage of a wheel and axle is the ratio of the radius of the wheel divided by the radius of the axle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy What is the MA?
  379. 379.  The mechanical advantage of a wheel and axle is the ratio of the radius of the wheel divided by the radius of the axle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy What is the MA? 5/1 =
  380. 380.  The mechanical advantage of a wheel and axle is the ratio of the radius of the wheel divided by the radius of the axle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy What is the MA? 5/1 = MA 5
  381. 381.  Radius: A straight line from a circles center to its perimeter.
  382. 382. • Diameter: The length of a straight line passing through the center of a circle and connecting two points on the circumference.
  383. 383. • Diameter: The length of a straight line passing through the center of a circle and connecting two points on the circumference. Diameter
  384. 384. • Diameter: The length of a straight line passing through the center of a circle and connecting two points on the circumference. Diameter
  385. 385. • What is the MA of this wheel below? r=60 cm r=3 cm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  386. 386. • MA = 20 r=60 cm r=3 cm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  387. 387. 1.25 m .5 m “The MA is not 2.5, it’s 5.5”
  388. 388. 1.25 m .5 m “Dude, She’s right, the MA is 2.5”
  389. 389. 1.25 m .5 m “Yah, but… Arggh”
  390. 390. • Note how this mousetrap car is using a wheel that would have a high mechanical advantage. 15 cm .5 cm
  391. 391. • Note how this mousetrap car is using a wheel that would have a high mechanical advantage. 15 cm .5 cm 15/.5 =
  392. 392. • Note how this mousetrap car is using a wheel that would have a high mechanical advantage. 15 cm .5 cm 15/.5 = MA 30
  393. 393. Wheel and Axle, Mechanical Advantage. Learn more at… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheel_and_axle
  394. 394. • Activity! Trace an old compact disc into your science journal and pretend it is a wheel and axle. (Crayola Marker is Axle) – Find the Mechanical Advantage of this wheel and axle.
  395. 395. • Activity! Trace an old compact disc into your science journal and pretend it is a wheel and axle. (Crayola Marker is Axle) – Find the Mechanical Advantage of this wheel and axle.
  396. 396. • Activity! Trace an old compact disc into your science journal and pretend it is a wheel and axle. (Crayola Marker is Axle) – Find the Mechanical Advantage of this wheel and axle.
  397. 397. • Activity! Trace an old compact disc into your science journal and pretend it is a wheel and axle. (Crayola Marker is Axle) – Find the Mechanical Advantage of this wheel and axle. Wheel radius = 5.2 cm
  398. 398. • Activity! Trace an old compact disc into your science journal and pretend it is a wheel and axle. (Crayola Marker is Axle) – Find the Mechanical Advantage of this wheel and axle. Wheel radius = 5.2 cm
  399. 399. • Activity! Trace an old compact disc into your science journal and pretend it is a wheel and axle. (Crayola Marker is Axle) – Find the Mechanical Advantage of this wheel and axle. Wheel radius = 5.2 cm Axle radius = .75 cm
  400. 400. • Activity! Trace an old compact disc into your science journal and pretend it is a wheel and axle. (Crayola Marker is Axle) – Find the Mechanical Advantage of this wheel and axle. 5.2 / .75 = MA Wheel radius = 5.2 cm Axle radius = .75 cm
  401. 401. • Activity! Trace an old compact disc into your science journal and pretend it is a wheel and axle. (Crayola Marker is Axle) – Find the Mechanical Advantage of this wheel and axle. 5.2 / .75 = MA 6.93 (We can call 7) Wheel radius = 5.2 cm Axle radius = .75 cm
  402. 402. • Simple Machines Available Sheet: – Wheel and Axle.
  403. 403. • Wheel and Axle. – Find the numbers of newtons to drag your journal across the table with some weights on it. – Next, place Crayola Markers under the journal with the weights on top and use the Spring Scale to find the # of newtons. – What was the difference in newtons?
  404. 404.  An Inclined plane: A slanting surface connecting a lower level to a higher level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  405. 405. • Where are the inclined planes? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  406. 406. • Answer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  407. 407. • Field Trip! Let’s visit the inclined plane. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  408. 408. • Activity! Finding the Mechanical Advantage (MA) of the Handicap ramp (Inclined Plane) at the school.
  409. 409. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed.
  410. 410. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  411. 411. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  412. 412. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  413. 413. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  414. 414. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  415. 415. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  416. 416. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  417. 417. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  418. 418. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  419. 419. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  420. 420. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  421. 421. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  422. 422. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  423. 423. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  424. 424. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  425. 425. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  426. 426. • Law Conservation of energy: energy cannot be created or destroyed. – Simple machines generally require more work / energy to complete a task. Example
  427. 427. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  428. 428. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  429. 429. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  430. 430. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  431. 431.  MA for an inclined plane is the length of the slope divided by the height (Rise). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  432. 432.  MA for an inclined plane is the length of the slope divided by the height (Rise). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  433. 433.  MA for an inclined plane is the length of the slope divided by the height (Rise). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  434. 434.  MA for an inclined plane is the length of the slope divided by the height (Rise). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 100m 500m FO FI
  435. 435.  MA for an inclined plane is the length of the slope divided by the height (Rise). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 100m 500m100m 500mFO FI
  436. 436.  MA for an inclined plane is the length of the slope divided by the height (Rise).  What’s the MA of this inclined plane? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 100m 500m100m 500mFO FI
  437. 437.  MA for an inclined plane is the length of the slope divided by the height (Rise).  What’s the MA of this inclined plane? 5 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 100m 500mMA = 5 100m 500mFO FI
  438. 438. • Inclined plane is a wedge
  439. 439. • Activity Simulator: Inclined Plane • http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/the- ramp
  440. 440. • Simple Machines Available Sheet: – Inclined Plane
  441. 441. • Set-up of activity. – The number of textbook will change. The independent variable. – The dependent variable is the # of newtons. – The control is the same weight, surface, spring scale, etc between the trials. Learn more at.. http://illuminations.nctm.org/LessonDetail.aspx?id=L278
  442. 442. • Activity! How does an inclined plane make work easier. – Use the spring scale and with attached weight to determine the difference in newtons to overcome friction in the following. – Find MA by measuring height and the slope. • Divide the length of the slope by the height. • Flat ramp (no textbooks) newtons ______ • Low ramp (3 textbooks) newtons ______ • Medium ramp (6 textbooks) newtons _____ • Steep ramp (9 books) newtons ______ • Weight hanging with no ramp newtons ______ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  443. 443. Flat ramp (no textbooks) newtons ___.5___ Low ramp (3 textbooks) newtons ___1.0___ Medium ramp (6 textbooks) newtons ___1.5___ Steep ramp (9 textbooks) newtons ___2.0___ Weight with no ramp newtons ___2.5___ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  444. 444. • Questions / Follow up to Inclined Plane. – Using data (Netwons) in your response, How did the various inclined planes effect the amount of work needed to get your journal up the ramp. – Use a meter stick to find the Mechanical Advantage of the inclined plane with 3 textbooks vs. 9 textbooks. You need to measure the height and the length of the ramp. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  445. 445. • Questions / Follow up to Inclined Plane. – Using data (newtons) in your response, How did the various inclined planes effect the amount of work needed to get your weight up the ramp? – Use a meter stick to find the Mechanical Advantage of the inclined plane with 3 textbooks vs. 9 textbooks. You need to measure the height and the length of the ramp. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  446. 446. • Questions / Follow up to Inclined Plane. – Using data (newtons) in your response, How did the various inclined planes effect the amount of work needed to get your weight up the ramp? – Use a meter stick to find the Mechanical Advantage of the inclined plane with 3 textbooks vs. 9 textbooks. You need to measure the height and the length of the ramp. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  447. 447. • Determining the MA for an inclined is very important when building roadways. – Too steep and some cars and trucks may not make it. – Too shallow, and it just takes to long. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  448. 448. • Video Link! (Optional) Alpe d’huez (Inclined Plane) Tour De France – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F94TCxLY Zew
  449. 449.  Screw: An inclined plane wrapped around a pole which holds things together or lifts materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  450. 450.  Screw: An inclined plane wrapped around a pole which holds things together or lifts materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  451. 451.  Screw: An inclined plane wrapped around a pole which holds things together or lifts materials. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  452. 452.  The mechanical advantage of a screw can be found by dividing the circumference of the screw by the pitch of the screw. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  453. 453. • The gentler the pitch (i.e. finer the thread), the easier it moves, but you have to make a lot of turns. – Which of the samples below has the highest MA? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  454. 454. • The gentler the pitch (i.e. finer the thread), the easier it moves, but you have to make a lot of turns. – Which of the samples below has the highest MA? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  455. 455. • The gentler the pitch (i.e. finer the thread), the easier it moves, but you have to make a lot of turns. – Which of the samples below has the highest MA? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  456. 456.  The circumference of a circle is the distance around the circle. It is the circle's perimeter. The formula for circumference is:  Circumference = times Diameter  C = π d  Where π = 3.14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  457. 457.  The circumference of a circle is the distance around the circle. It is the circle's perimeter. The formula for circumference is:  Circumference = times Diameter  C = π d  Where π = 3.14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  458. 458.  The circumference of a circle is the distance around the circle. It is the circle's perimeter. The formula for circumference is:  Circumference = times Diameter  C = π d  Where π = 3.14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  459. 459.  The circumference of a circle is the distance around the circle. It is the circle's perimeter. The formula for circumference is:  Circumference = times Diameter  C = π d  Where π = 3.14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  460. 460.  The circumference of a circle is the distance around the circle. It is the circle's perimeter. The formula for circumference is:  Circumference = times Diameter  C = π d  Where π = 3.14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  461. 461.  The circumference of a circle is the distance around the circle. It is the circle's perimeter. The formula for circumference is:  Circumference = times Diameter  C = π d  Where π = 3.14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  462. 462.  The circumference of a circle is the distance around the circle. It is the circle's perimeter. The formula for circumference is:  Circumference = times Diameter  C = π d  Where π = 3.14 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  463. 463. • Simple Machines Available Sheet: Screw
  464. 464. • What is the MA of the screw below? • Divide circumference by the pitch to get MA. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  465. 465. • What is the MA of the screw below? • Divide circumference by the pitch to get MA. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy .5 cm 2 cm
  466. 466. • What is the MA of the screw below? • Divide circumference by the pitch to get MA. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy .5 cm 2 cm
  467. 467. • 2 = 6.28 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2 cm .5 cm
  468. 468. • 2 = 6.28 • 6.28 / .5 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2 cm .5 cm
  469. 469. • 2 = 6.28 • 6.28 / .5 Mechanical Advantage = 12.56 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 2 cm .5 cm
  470. 470. • What is the mechanical advantage of this screw? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4 mm 6 mm
  471. 471. • What is the mechanical advantage of this screw? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4 mm 6 mm
  472. 472. • 6 = = Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4 mm 6 mm
  473. 473. • 6 = = 18.84 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4 mm 6 mm
  474. 474. • 6 = = 18.84 • 18.84 / 4 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4 mm 6 mm
  475. 475. • 6 = = 18.84 • 18.84 / 4 Mechanical Advantage = 4.71 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy 4 mm 6 mm
  476. 476. • What is the mechanical advantage of this giant screw? Measure with a meter stick (centimeters) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  477. 477. • Archimedes Screw: A screw contained in a cylinder that when turned can easily raise water.
  478. 478. • Pascal's Law: If you apply pressure to fluids that are confined (or can’t flow anywhere), the fluids will then transmit (or send out) that same pressure in all directions at the same rate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  479. 479. • Pascal's Law: If you apply pressure to fluids that are confined (or can’t flow anywhere), the fluids will then transmit (or send out) that same pressure in all directions at the same rate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Cool Picture of a Gnome being squeezed and yelling something about Pascal in a different language.
  480. 480. • Pascal's Law: If you apply pressure to fluids that are confined (or can’t flow anywhere), the fluids will then transmit (or send out) that same pressure in all directions at the same rate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  481. 481. • Hydraulics - The branch of applied science that deals with fluids in motion.
  482. 482. • Hydraulics - The branch of applied science that deals with fluids in motion.
  483. 483. • Hydraulic system: Force applied at one end is transmitted to the other using a incompressible fluid.
  484. 484. • Hydraulic system: Force applied at one end is transmitted to the other using a incompressible fluid. – The fluid is almost always an oil. The force is almost always multiplied in the process.
  485. 485. How Hydraulics Work. Learn more at… http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/engines- equipment/hydraulic.htm
  486. 486. • Activity – Pascal’s Law and Hydraulics.
  487. 487. • Activity! Making a hydraulic syringe drive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  488. 488. • Activity! Making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Push syringe to bottom of tube on one side. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  489. 489. • Activity! Making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Push syringe to bottom of tube on one side. – Dip end of syringe in water and pull to fill tube. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  490. 490. • Activity! Making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Push syringe to bottom of tube on one side. – Dip end of syringe in water and pull to fill tube. – Attach hose to one side. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  491. 491. • Activity! Making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Push syringe to bottom of tube on one side. – Dip end of syringe in water and pull to fill tube. – Attach hose to one side. – Depress syringe until water comes out of tube. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  492. 492. • Activity! Making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Push syringe to bottom of tube on one side. – Dip end of syringe in water and pull to fill tube. – Attach hose to one side. – Depress syringe until water comes out of tube. – Attach other syringe that is depressed fully. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  493. 493. • Activity! Making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Push syringe to bottom of tube on one side. – Dip end of syringe in water and pull to fill tube. – Attach hose to one side. – Depress syringe until water comes out of tube. – Attach other syringe that is depressed fully. – Push one side down at a time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  494. 494. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Draw / Sketch the hydraulic drive you created. – How is Pascal’s Law related to the hydraulic drive you just built? – Would it work better with oil, or with creamy peanut butter? Explain your answer using viscosity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  495. 495. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Draw / Sketch the hydraulic drive you created. – How is Pascal’s Law related to the hydraulic drive you just built? – Would it work better with oil, or with creamy peanut butter? Explain your answer using viscosity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  496. 496. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Draw / Sketch the hydraulic drive you created. – How is Pascal’s Law related to the hydraulic drive you just built? – Would it work better with oil, or with creamy peanut butter? Explain your answer using viscosity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Viscosity: Resistance of liquid to flow.
  497. 497. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Draw / Sketch the hydraulic drive you created. – How is Pascal’s Law related to the hydraulic drive you just built? – Would it work better with oil, or with creamy peanut butter? Explain your answer using viscosity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Viscosity: Resistance of liquid to flow. -High Viscosity = Difficult to flow.
  498. 498. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Draw / Sketch the hydraulic drive you created. – How is Pascal’s Law related to the hydraulic drive you just built? – Would it work better with oil, or with creamy peanut butter? Explain your answer using viscosity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Viscosity: Resistance of liquid to flow. -High Viscosity = Difficult to flow. -Low Viscosity = Easy to flow.
  499. 499. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Draw / Sketch the hydraulic drive you created. – How is Pascal’s Law related to the hydraulic drive you just built? – Would it work better with oil, or with creamy peanut butter? Explain your answer using viscosity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  500. 500. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Draw / Sketch the hydraulic drive you created. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  501. 501. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Draw / Sketch the hydraulic drive you created. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  502. 502. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – How is Pascal’s Law related to the hydraulic drive you just built? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  503. 503. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – How is Pascal’s Law related to the hydraulic drive you just built? – Answer: When the syringe is depressed, the fluid is sent out (transmitted) equally in all directions and flows through the tube to the syringe on the other side. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  504. 504. • Questions to making a hydraulic syringe drive. – Would it work better with oil, or with creamy peanut butter? Explain your answer using viscosity. – It would work better with oil because it has a lower viscosity (resistance to flow) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  505. 505. • Activity! Roving simple machine finding. – Go stand by a simple machine. – I will go around the room and point to you, say the simple machine and point. – Scope out a new machine and when everyone is done you have a few seconds to find a new one that hasn’t been used. – Last person standing with a simple machine to point out wins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  506. 506. • Activity! Roving simple machine finding. – Go stand by a simple machine. – I will go around the room and point to you, say the simple machine and point. – Scope out a new machine and when everyone is done you have a few seconds to find a new one that hasn’t been used. – Last person standing with a simple machine to point out wins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  507. 507. • Activity! Roving simple machine finding. – Go stand by a simple machine. – I will go around the room and point to you, say the simple machine and point. – Scope out a new machine and when everyone is done you have a few seconds to find a new one that hasn’t been used. – Last person standing with a simple machine to point out wins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  508. 508. • Activity! Roving simple machine finding. – Go stand by a simple machine. – I will go around the room and point to you, say the simple machine and point. – Scope out a new machine and when everyone is done you have a few seconds to find a new one that hasn’t been used. – Last person standing with a simple machine to point out wins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  509. 509. • Activity! Roving simple machine finding. – Go stand by a simple machine. – I will go around the room and point to you, say the simple machine and point. – Scope out a new machine and when everyone is done you have a few seconds to find a new one that hasn’t been used. – Last person standing with a simple machine to point out wins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  510. 510. • Activity! Going to the gym with our journals to investigate a compound machine in action. – What simple machines are used? – How do they work together to make work easier? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  511. 511. • Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  512. 512. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  513. 513. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  514. 514. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  515. 515. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  516. 516. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  517. 517. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  518. 518. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  519. 519. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  520. 520. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  521. 521. • Quiz Wiz! 1-10 Name the Simple Machine Wheel and axle
  522. 522. • Review – Name a few machines seen in this animation.
  523. 523. • Quiz Wiz 1-10 Name the simple machine.
  524. 524. • Bonus – What simple machine do I represent.
  525. 525. • Answers to the Quiz
  526. 526. • Bonus – What simple machine do I represent.
  527. 527. • Simple Machine – Wheel and Axle for Axl Rose.
  528. 528.  Compound machines: Two or more simple machines working together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  529. 529.  Compound machines: Two or more simple machines working together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Lever
  530. 530.  Compound machines: Two or more simple machines working together. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Lever Wedge
  531. 531. Simple Machines: Learn more at.. http://www.cosi.org/downloads/activities/ simplemachines/sm1.html
  532. 532. • What two simple machines make this pizza cutter and compound machine?
  533. 533. • Wheel and axle and the wedge.
  534. 534. • What two simple machines make up this very simple can opener? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  535. 535. • Answer: Wedge and Lever Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  536. 536. • What simple machines make this can opener a compound machine?
  537. 537. • Wheel and Axle,
  538. 538. • Wheel and Axle, Lever,
  539. 539. • Wheel and Axle, Lever, Wedge
  540. 540. • Activity! Using a Dolly to move a person down the hall. – What two simple machines are being used?
  541. 541. • Answer: Wheel and Axle / Lever
  542. 542. • Answer: Wheel and Axle / Lever – What class lever would it be?
  543. 543. • Answer: Wheel and Axle / Lever – What class lever would it be? Load Fulcrum Effort
  544. 544. • Answer: Wheel and Axle / Lever – What class lever would it be? – Answer: Third Class Lever Load Fulcrum Effort
  545. 545. • Video Link! OK GO Rube Goldberg Machine – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qybUFnY7Y8 w HD – Teacher Tube: http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?vide o_id=196729
  546. 546. • Additional Rube Goldberg Machines from Japan. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VI47chBIgOU
  547. 547. • Activity! Crazy Machine (Optional) – Your table group must use a ball bearing (Start) to pop a balloon (Finish) using an example of every simple machine. – I will provide some materials, but you will also need to bring in some useful materials. • Build part of it at home. – Your crazy machine must be confined to a lab table. – One period to plan, one period to build and implement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  548. 548. • Activity! Crazy Machine (Optional) – Your table group must use a ball bearing (Start) to pop a balloon (Finish) using an example of every simple machine. – I will provide some materials, but you will also need to bring in some useful materials. • Build part of it at home. – Your crazy machine must be confined to a lab table. – One period to plan, one period to build and implement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  549. 549. • Activity! Crazy Machine (Optional) – Your table group must use a ball bearing (Start) to pop a balloon (Finish) using an example of every simple machine. – I will provide some materials, but you will also need to bring in some useful materials. • Build part of it at home. – Your crazy machine must be confined to a lab table. – One period to plan, one period to build and implement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  550. 550. • Activity! Crazy Machine (Optional) – Your table group must use a ball bearing (Start) to pop a balloon (Finish) using an example of every simple machine. – I will provide some materials, but you will also need to bring in some useful materials. • Build part of it at home. – Your crazy machine must be confined to a lab table. – One period to plan, one period to build and implement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  551. 551. • Activity! Crazy Machine (Optional) – Your table group must use a ball bearing (Start) to pop a balloon (Finish) using an example of every simple machine. – I will provide some materials, but you will also need to bring in some useful materials. • Build part of it at home. – Your crazy machine must be confined to a lab table. – One period to plan, one period to build and implement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  552. 552. • Activity! Crazy Machine (Optional) – Your table group must use a ball bearing (Start) to pop a balloon (Finish) using an example of every simple machine. – I will provide some materials, but you will also need to bring in some useful materials. • Build part of it at home. – Your crazy machine must be confined to a lab table. – One period to plan, one period to build and implement. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  553. 553. • Table groups need to create a blue-print in journal. • Class materials include the following. – Balloon – Pulleys and string, rulers / levers – Ball Bearing – Long inclined plane – Hot-wheels cars – Hot-wheels track – Elastics (to be used in class only) – And much more from the junk box. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  554. 554. • Be the first to guess the hidden pictures beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  555. 555. • Try Again! Be the first to guess the hidden pictures beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  556. 556. • Try Again! Be the first to guess the hidden pictures beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  557. 557. • Good grade = Goes far • Poor grade = Doesn’t go far • Cool and colorful but doesn’t go far = Poor grade!
  558. 558. • Mouster Truck Presentations. – Students should place mousetrap car by their poster board. – Teacher will count you off, 1, 2, 1, 2, etc – 1’s will present their poster board to the 2’s and teacher.. Please try and visit as many as you can. – 2’s will then present to the 1’s and teacher. Please visit as many as you can. – Get your car ready as the trials will start soon. – Any Predictions. Scoring chart on next page…
  559. 559. Grade A+ A A- B+ B B- C D X Distance Meters 10+ 5+ 4.5 4.0 3.5 3.0 2.0 1.0 0 Possible Grading: Based solely on distance.
  560. 560. • Your homework bundle is due shortly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  561. 561. • You can now add text to the white space and neatly color the pictures to these parts.
  562. 562. Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
  563. 563. Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
  564. 564. Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
  565. 565. Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
  566. 566. Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
  567. 567. Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
  568. 568. Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
  569. 569. Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
  570. 570. Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
  571. 571. Discuss the bungee jumping egg experience
  572. 572. • Activity! Answer with your feet.
  573. 573. A B Teacher needs to label the corners of the room. C D
  574. 574. A B Please walk safely and take some wrong turns before traveling to the corner with the correct answer. C D
  575. 575. A B All energy is… A.) Kinetic or Potential. B.) At a state of rest. C.) Subjected to gravity. D.) Work = Mass x Distance C D
  576. 576. A B All energy is… A.) Kinetic or Potential. B.) At a state of rest. C.) Subjected to gravity. D.) Work = Mass x Distance C D
  577. 577. A B Kinetic Energy is the energy an object has because of it’s… A.) Mass and Motion. B.) Time and Space. C.) Friction Level D.) Affects on gravity. C D
  578. 578. A B Kinetic Energy is the energy an object has because of it’s… A.) Mass and Motion. B.) Time and Space. C.) Friction Level D.) Affects on gravity. C D
  579. 579. A B This is a stiff bar that rests on a support called a fulcrum which lifts or moves loads. A.) Wedge B.) Inclined plane C.) Lever D.) Screw C D
  580. 580. A B This is a stiff bar that rests on a support called a fulcrum which lifts or moves loads. A.) Wedge B.) Inclined plane C.) Lever D.) Screw C D
  581. 581. A B This is the straight line from a circles center to its perimeter. A.) Diameter B.) Distance C.) Radius D.) Mechanical Advantage C D
  582. 582. A B This is the straight line from a circles center to its perimeter. A.) Diameter B.) Distance C.) Radius D.) Mechanical Advantage C D
  583. 583. A B This is the name for an object with at least one slanting side ending in a sharp edge, which cuts material apart. A.) Pulley B.) Wedge C.) Second Class Lever D.) Third Class Lever C D
  584. 584. A B This is the name for an object with at least one slanting side ending in a sharp edge, which cuts material apart. A.) Pulley B.) Wedge C.) Second Class Lever D.) Third Class Lever C D
  585. 585. A B This is the name for a slanting surface connecting a lower level to a higher level. A.) Block and Tackle B.) Wedge C.) Inclined Plane D.) First Class Lever C D
  586. 586. A B This is the name for a slanting surface connecting a lower level to a higher level. A.) Block and Tackle B.) Wedge C.) Inclined Plane D.) First Class Lever C D
  587. 587. A B • Machines do all of the following except… A.) Transfer force from one place to another. B.) Change direction of a force. C.) Does not require energy to create a force. D.) Increase the distance or speed of a force. C D
  588. 588. A B • Machines do all of the following except… A.) Transfer force from one place to another. B.) Change direction of a force. C.) Does not require energy to create a force. D.) Increase the distance or speed of a force. C D
  589. 589. A B What is the MA of this inclined plane? A.) 2 B.) 4 C.) 8 D.) 32

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