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A 2000+ slide PowerPoint presentation from www.sciencepowerpoint.com becomes the roadmap for an amazing learning experience. Complete with homework package, built-in activities with directions, ...

A 2000+ slide PowerPoint presentation from www.sciencepowerpoint.com becomes the roadmap for an amazing learning experience. Complete with homework package, built-in activities with directions, built-in quizzes, unit notes, follow along worksheets, answer keys, video links, review games, rubrics, and much more.
Also included are directions on how create a student version of the unit that is much like the teachers but missing the answer keys, quizzes, PowerPoint review games, hidden box challenges, owl, and surprises meant for the classroom. This is a great resource to distribute to your students and support professionals and will only take you a few minutes to create.
This is a great introductory unit that covers science topics associated with Lab Safety, Magnification, Base Units of the Metric System, Scientific Method, Inferences, and Observation Skills (See list below for more topics covered). This unit includes an interactive and engaging PowerPoint Presentation of 2000 slides with built in class notes (Red Slides), lab activities, project ideas, discussion questions, assessments (Quiz Wiz), and challenge questions with answers.
Text is in large print (32 font) and is placed at the top of each slide so it can seen and read from all angles of a classroom. A shade technique, as well as color coded text helps to increase student focus and allows teacher to control pace of the lessons. Also included is a 10 page assessment / bundled homework that chronologically follows the slideshow for nightly homework and end of the unit assessment, as well as a 9 page modified assessment. 14 pages of class notes with images are also included for students who require modifications, as well as answer keys to both of the assessments for support professionals, teachers, and home school parents. Several video links are provided and a slide within the slideshow cues teacher / parent when the videos are most relevant to play. Video shorts usually range from 2-7 minutes. One PowerPoint review game (125+ slides)is included. Answers to the PowerPoint review game are provided in PowerPoint form so students can self-assess. Lastly, several class games such as guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes, and the find the hidden owl somewhere within the slideshow are provided. Difficulty rating of 5 (Ten is most difficult)

Thank you for time and if you have any questions please feel free to contact me at www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com. Best wishes.
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

Sincerely,
Ryan Murphy M.Ed
Science PowerPoints

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    Scientific Method and Variables Scientific Method and Variables Presentation Transcript

    • Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
    • • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/
    • -Please make notes legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label
    •  New Area of Focus: Observation, Inferences, and the Scientific Method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  New Area of Focus: Observation, Inferences, and the Scientific Method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  New Area of Focus: Observation, Inferences, and the Scientific Method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  New Area of Focus: Observation, Inferences, and the Scientific Method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  New Area of Focus: Observation, Inferences, and the Scientific Method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  New Area of Focus: Observation, Inferences, and the Scientific Method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • What is science? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Science is…  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  A study of natural phenomenon.
    •  A systematic study and method.
    •  A systematic study and method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  A systematic study and method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  A systematic study and method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  A systematic study and method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  A systematic study and method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  A systematic study and method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  A systematic study and method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Knowledge through experience. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  A good Scientist is….  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Is safe! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Is safe! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Is accurate, precise and methodical. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Is unbiased, a seeker of the truth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Can observe and question. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Can find solutions, reasons, and research. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Works in all weather conditions if safe. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Can overcome obstacles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Collaborates (talks) with others. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy S C I e N C e For RealT O D A Y F U N
    •  Science is a systematic attempt to get around human limitations.  Science tries to remove personal experience from the scientific process.
    •  Science is a systematic attempt to get around human limitations.  Science tries to remove personal experience from the scientific process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Science is a systematic attempt to get around human limitations.  Science tries to remove personal experience from the scientific process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I love Science
    •  Science is a systematic attempt to get around human limitations.  Science tries to remove personal experience from the scientific process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I love ScienceThis data set makes me happy
    •  Science is a systematic attempt to get around human limitations.  Science tries to remove personal experience from the scientific process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I love Science.”“This data set makes me happy.” “I wanted better data.”
    •  Science is a systematic attempt to get around human limitations.  Science tries to remove personal experience from the scientific process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I love Science.”“This data set makes me happy.” “I wanted better data.” “Failure is not an option.”
    •  Science is a systematic attempt to get around human limitations.  Science tries to remove personal experience from the scientific process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I love Science.”“This data set makes me happy.” “I wanted better data.” “Failure is not an option.”
    •  TRY AND WRITE WITHOUT PERSONAL PRONOUNS.  DO NOT USE…I, me, you, he, she, we, you, they, them, theirs, names, etc. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  TRY AND WRITE WITHOUT PERSONAL PRONOUNS.  DO NOT USE…I, me, you, he, she, we, you, they, them, theirs, names, etc. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Do not end science writing with the words “The End.” Save that for Disney movies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Please pass three items around the table three times. – Then write about your experience without using any personal pronouns. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Please pass three items around the table three times. – Then write about your experience without using any personal pronouns. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How the paragraph could have been written. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • How the paragraph could have been written. – Three items were passed around the table in a random fashion. Each member of the table passed and contributed one item. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End.
    • • Answer! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End.
    • • Answer! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer! Find the personal pronouns in this poorly written example. – Our table group was asked to pass three items around. I passed a pencil while Mark and Jill both passed their textbook. We passed our items around until we heard our teacher say “stop.” -The End. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Branches of Science… – How many branches of science do you know. – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Types of scientists… – Biology – The study of life. – Geology – The study of Earth. – Chemistry – The study of Matter. – Physics – The study of matter and energy. – - – - – - – - – -The list will continue on the next page. Each branch is a possible career field for you. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Aerodynamics: the study of the motion of gas on objects and the forces created • Anatomy: the study of the structure and organization of living things • Anthropology: the study of human cultures both past and present • Archaeology: the study of the material remains of cultures • Astronomy: the study of celestial objects in the universe • Astrophysics: the study of the physics of the universe • Bacteriology: the study of bacteria in relation to disease • Biochemistry: the study of the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organisms • Biophysics: the application of theories and methods of the physical sciences to questions of biology • Biology: the science that studies living organisms • Botany: the scientific study of plant life • Chemical Engineering: the application of science, mathematics, and economics to the process of converting raw materials or chemicals into more useful or valuable forms • Chemistry: the science of matter and its interactions with energy and itself
    • • Climatology: the study of climates and investigations of its phenomena and causes • Computer Science: the systematic study of computing systems and computation • Ecology: the study of how organisms interact with each other and their environment • Electronics: science and technology of electronic phenomena • Engineering: the practical application of science to commerce or industry • Entomology: the study of insects • Environmental Science: the science of the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment • Forestry: the science of studying and managing forests and plantations, and related natural resources • Genetics: the science of genes, heredity, and the variation of organisms • Geology: the science of the Earth, its structure, and history
    • • Marine Biology: the study of animal and plant life within saltwater ecosystems Mathematics: a science dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement • Medicine: the science concerned with maintaining health and restoring it by treating disease • Meteorology: study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting • Microbiology: the study of microorganisms, including viruses, prokaryotes and simple eukaryotes • Mineralogy: the study of the chemistry, crystal structure, and physical (including optical) properties of minerals • Molecular Biology: the study of biology at a molecular level. • Nuclear Physics: the branch of physics concerned with the nucleus of the atom • Neurology: the branch of medicine dealing with the nervous system and its disorders • Oceanography: study of the earth's oceans and their interlinked ecosystems and chemical and physical processes
    • • Organic Chemistry: the branch of chemistry dedicated to the study of the structures, synthesis, and reactions of carbon- containing compounds • Ornithology: the study of birds • Paleontology: the study of life-forms existing in former geological time periods • Petrology: the geological and chemical study of rocks • Physics: the study of the behavior and properties of matter • Physiology: the study of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of living organisms • Radiology: the branch of medicine dealing with the applications of radiant energy, including x-rays and radioisotopes • Seismology: the study of earthquakes and the movement of waves through the Earth • Taxonomy: the science of classification of animals and plants • Thermodynamics: the physics of energy, heat, work, entropy and the spontaneity of processes • Zoology: the study of animals
    • • Aerodynamics: the study of the motion of gas on objects and the forces created • Anatomy: the study of the structure and organization of living things • Anthropology: the study of human cultures both past and present • Archaeology: the study of the material remains of cultures • Astronomy: the study of celestial objects in the universe • Astrophysics: the study of the physics of the universe • Bacteriology: the study of bacteria in relation to disease • Biochemistry: the study of the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organisms • Biophysics: the application of theories and methods of the physical sciences to questions of biology • Biology: the science that studies living organisms • Botany: the scientific study of plant life • Chemical Engineering: the application of science, mathematics, and economics to the process of converting raw materials or chemicals into more useful or valuable forms • Chemistry: the science of matter and its interactions with energy and itself • Climatology: the study of climates and investigations of its phenomena and causes • Computer Science: the systematic study of computing systems and computation • Ecology: the study of how organisms interact with each other and their environment • Electronics: science and technology of electronic phenomena • Engineering: the practical application of science to commerce or industry • Entomology: the study of insects • Environmental Science: the science of the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment • Forestry: the science of studying and managing forests and plantations, and related natural resources • Genetics: the science of genes, heredity, and the variation of organisms • Geology: the science of the Earth, its structure, and history • Marine Biology: the study of animal and plant life within saltwater ecosystems Mathematics: a science dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement • Medicine: the science concerned with maintaining health and restoring it by treating disease • Meteorology: study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting • Microbiology: the study of microorganisms, including viruses, prokaryotes and simple eukaryotes • Mineralogy: the study of the chemistry, crystal structure, and physical (including optical) properties of minerals • Molecular Biology: the study of biology at a molecular level. • Nuclear Physics: the branch of physics concerned with the nucleus of the atom • Neurology: the branch of medicine dealing with the nervous system and its disorders • Oceanography: study of the earth's oceans and their interlinked ecosystems and chemical and physical processes • Organic Chemistry: the branch of chemistry dedicated to the study of the structures, synthesis, and reactions of carbon-containing compounds • Ornithology: the study of birds • Paleontology: the study of life-forms existing in former geological time periods • Petrology: the geological and chemical study of rocks • Physics: the study of the behavior and properties of matter • Physiology: the study of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of living organisms • Radiology: the branch of medicine dealing with the applications of radiant energy, including x-rays and radioisotopes • Seismology: the study of earthquakes and the movement of waves through the Earth • Taxonomy: the science of classification of animals and plants • Thermodynamics: the physics of energy, heat, work, entropy and the spontaneity of processes • Zoology: the study of animals
    • • Aerodynamics: the study of the motion of gas on objects and the forces created • Anatomy: the study of the structure and organization of living things • Anthropology: the study of human cultures both past and present • Archaeology: the study of the material remains of cultures • Astronomy: the study of celestial objects in the universe • Astrophysics: the study of the physics of the universe • Bacteriology: the study of bacteria in relation to disease • Biochemistry: the study of the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organisms • Biophysics: the application of theories and methods of the physical sciences to questions of biology • Biology: the science that studies living organisms • Botany: the scientific study of plant life • Chemical Engineering: the application of science, mathematics, and economics to the process of converting raw materials or chemicals into more useful or valuable forms • Chemistry: the science of matter and its interactions with energy and itself • Climatology: the study of climates and investigations of its phenomena and causes • Computer Science: the systematic study of computing systems and computation • Ecology: the study of how organisms interact with each other and their environment • Electronics: science and technology of electronic phenomena • Engineering: the practical application of science to commerce or industry • Entomology: the study of insects • Environmental Science: the science of the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment • Forestry: the science of studying and managing forests and plantations, and related natural resources • Genetics: the science of genes, heredity, and the variation of organisms • Geology: the science of the Earth, its structure, and history • Marine Biology: the study of animal and plant life within saltwater ecosystems Mathematics: a science dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement • Medicine: the science concerned with maintaining health and restoring it by treating disease • Meteorology: study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting • Microbiology: the study of microorganisms, including viruses, prokaryotes and simple eukaryotes • Mineralogy: the study of the chemistry, crystal structure, and physical (including optical) properties of minerals • Molecular Biology: the study of biology at a molecular level. • Nuclear Physics: the branch of physics concerned with the nucleus of the atom • Neurology: the branch of medicine dealing with the nervous system and its disorders • Oceanography: study of the earth's oceans and their interlinked ecosystems and chemical and physical processes • Organic Chemistry: the branch of chemistry dedicated to the study of the structures, synthesis, and reactions of carbon-containing compounds • Ornithology: the study of birds • Paleontology: the study of life-forms existing in former geological time periods • Petrology: the geological and chemical study of rocks • Physics: the study of the behavior and properties of matter • Physiology: the study of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of living organisms • Radiology: the branch of medicine dealing with the applications of radiant energy, including x-rays and radioisotopes • Seismology: the study of earthquakes and the movement of waves through the Earth • Taxonomy: the science of classification of animals and plants • Thermodynamics: the physics of energy, heat, work, entropy and the spontaneity of processes • Zoology: the study of animals
    •  Scientific method: A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry (questioning and experimenting). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Scientific method: A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry (questioning and experimenting). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Scientific method: A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry (questioning and experimenting). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Scientific method: A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry (questioning and experimenting). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    •  Scientific method: A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry (questioning and experimenting). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Sketching out the scientific method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! Sketching out the scientific method. – This requires a full page and will look like the example on the next page when done. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Add to background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Do something With the findings. Everything in the experiment should be the same except for the independent variable which is the one thing that is different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe and question Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Collect background information Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. MurphyCopyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Collect background information Form a Hypothesis
    • Observe Collect background information Form a Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group.
    • Observe Collect background information Form a Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Collect background information Form a Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Collect background information Form a Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Reject hypothesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Reject hypothesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create a new experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Reject hypothesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Collect background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Do something With the findings. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Add to background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Do something With the findings. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Add to background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Do something With the findings. Everything in the experiment should be the same except for the independent variable which is the one thing that is different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Add to background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Do something With the findings. Everything in the experiment should be the same except for the independent variable which is the one thing that is different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Observe Add to background information Form a new Hypothesis Create an experiment with a control group and experimental group. Collect data Analyze the data Support hypothesis Reject hypothesis Repeat experiment Do something With the findings. Everything in the experiment should be the same except for the independent variable which is the one thing that is different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about the scientific method: http://teacher.nsrl.rochester.edu/phy_labs/appendixe/appendixe.ht ml
    • • Experiments search for cause and effect relationships in nature.
    • • Experiments search for cause and effect relationships in nature. • These changing quantities are called variables.
    • • Does your grade depend on how much time you spend on your work?
    • • Does your grade depend on how much time you spend on your work? – The dependent variable depends on other factors (how much you studied, effort, etc.)
    • • Does your grade depend on how much time you spend on your work? – The dependent variable depends on other factors (how much you studied, effort, etc.) – Independent variable is the one you have control over (how much you studied).
    • • Does your grade depend on how much time you spend on your work? – The dependent variable depends on other factors (how much you studied, effort, etc.) – Independent variable is the one you have control over (how much you studied). • You have control over your grades.
    •  Variable: Changing quantity of something.  -  -  -
    •  Variable: Changing quantity of something.  -  -  -
    •  Variable: Changing quantity of something.  -  -  -
    •  Variable: Changing quantity of something.  -  -  -
    •  Independent: (Change) The variable you have control over, what you can choose and manipulate.
    •  Independent: (Change) The variable you have control over, what you can choose and manipulate.
    •  Independent: (Change) The variable you have control over, what you can choose and manipulate.
    •  Dependent: (Observe) What you measure in the experiment and what is affected during the experiment.
    •  Control: (Same) Quantities that a scientist wants to remain constant so it’s a fair test.
    •  Control: (Same) Quantities that a scientist wants to remain constant so it’s a fair test.
    •  Control: (Same) Quantities that a scientist wants to remain constant so it’s a fair test.
    •  Control: (Same) Quantities that a scientist wants to remain constant so it’s a fair test. Everything is exactly the same except for the independent variable
    • Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
    • Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
    • Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
    • Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
    • Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
    • Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
    • Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
    • Problem Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Does fertilizer help a plant to grow? Amount of fertilizer (grams) Growth of the plant, Height, number of leaves, flowers, etc Same amount of soil, light, water, space, all the same.
    • Problem? Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Do Pillbugs prefer a dark or light environment? One environment is dark, the other is light Count the number of Pillbugs that enter dark chamber. Moisture in both should be the same, temp, no food preference.
    • Problem? Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Do Pillbugs prefer a dark or light environment? One environment is dark, the other is light Count the number of Pillbugs that enter dark chamber. Moisture in both should be the same, temp, no food preference.
    • Problem? Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Do Pillbugs prefer a dark or light environment? One environment is dark, the other is light Count the number of Pillbugs that enter dark chamber. Moisture in both should be the same, temp, no food preference.
    • Problem? Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Do Pillbugs prefer a dark or light environment? One environment is dark, the other is light Count the number of Pillbugs that enter dark chamber. Moisture in both should be the same, temp, no food preference.
    • Problem? Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Do Pillbugs prefer a dark or light environment? One environment is dark, the other is light Count the number of Pillbugs that enter dark chamber. Moisture in both should be the same, temp, no food preference.
    • Problem? Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Do Pillbugs prefer a dark or light environment? One environment is dark, the other is light Count the number of Pillbugs that enter dark chamber. Moisture in both should be the same, temp, no food preference.
    • Problem? Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Do Pillbugs prefer a dark or light environment? One environment is dark, the other is light Count the number of Pillbugs that enter dark chamber. Moisture in both should be the same, temp, no food preference.
    • Problem? Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Do Pillbugs prefer a dark or light environment? One environment is dark, the other is light Count the number of Pillbugs that enter dark chamber. Moisture in both should be the same, temp, no food preference.
    • Problem? Independent Variable (Change) Dependent Variable (Observe) Control Variable (Same) Do Pillbugs prefer a dark or light environment? One environment is dark, the other is light Count the number of Pillbugs that enter dark chamber. Moisture in both should be the same, temp, no food preference.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on his counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the time it takes each one in minutes in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the time it takes each one in minutes in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the time it takes each one in minutes in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them.
    • • A student wants to find out what minerals melt ice the fastest. So the student places halite, calcite, hematite, and pyrite on equal sized cubes of ice on her counter in the kitchen. The student times how long it takes each mineral to melt completely through the ice cube. She records the minutes it takes for each one to melt in her science journal. • Problem? = What minerals melt ice quickly? • Independent Variable =Types of Minerals • Dependent Variable = Time in minutes • Control = Same size ice, temperature acts the same on all of them. – Everything is the same except for the minerals
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The students injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The students records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The students records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The students records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers. • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers. • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out how cigarette smoke blown into a small greenhouse of plants damages the plant. The student grows two small plants in separate clear plastic soda bottles. The student injects one with cigarette smoke periodically. Both are watered and given the same light conditions. The student records the height, number of leaves, and flowers of both plants everyday for one month. • Problem? = Does cigarette smoke damage plants? • Independent Variable = Cigarette Smoke • Dependent Variable = Height of plants, leaves, flowers. • Control = Both containers were identical except one was given cigarette smoke (independent variable).
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • A student wants to find out if an egg will crush more easily standing straight-up or on its side. The student creates a chamber that allows weights to be placed on a board that lies on top of the egg. The student places weights in grams on the board with an egg standing straight, and then on its side. The student records the total weight that was on the board when the egg crushed. • Problem? = What side of the egg is strongest? • Independent Variable = Egg straight or on side. • Dependent Variable = Weights in grams • Control = Similar brand of egg, similar size, same temp, everything is the same.
    • • Activity! Investigating the scientific method and soda cans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Soda and the Scientific Method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Soda and the Scientific Method. – Problem: What type of soda should we bring on a rafting trip? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Soda and the Scientific Method. – Problem: What type of soda should we bring on a rafting trip? – We are going rafting down a Class V section of whitewater. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Soda and the Scientific Method. – Problem: What type of soda should we bring on a rafting trip? – We are going rafting down a Class V section of whitewater. – The first rapid called “The Turbine” will definitely flip the raft and everything on it. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Please set up the spread sheet below. (6 by 7) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium mg Calories Sugar g Mass g Volume. ml Density g/cm3 Can you find?
    • • Please set up the spread sheet below. (6 by 7) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium mg Calories Sugar g Mass g Volume. ml Density g/cm3 Can you find? 375ml 375ml 375ml 375ml 375ml
    • • Soda and Scientific Method – Please find the information to complete the spreadsheet from the soda can labels. – Weigh each can on a balance. (In grams) – Feel free to place them in water to simulate the whitewater experience after spreadsheet is complete. (Keep area dry as wet floors are pose a slipping hazard) – Based on all of your findings, what soda should we bring and why? Use your data! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Soda and Scientific Method – Please find the information to complete the spreadsheet from the soda can labels. – Weigh each can on a balance. (In grams) – Feel free to place them in water to simulate the whitewater experience after spreadsheet is complete. (Keep area dry as wet floors are pose a slipping hazard) – Based on all of your findings, what soda should we bring and why? Use your data! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Soda and Scientific Method – Please find the information to complete the spreadsheet from the soda can labels. – Weigh each can on a balance. (In grams) – Feel free to place them in water to simulate the whitewater experience after spreadsheet is complete. (Keep area dry as wet floors are pose a slipping hazard) – Based on all of your findings, what soda should we bring and why? Use your data! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Soda and Scientific Method – Please find the information to complete the spreadsheet from the soda can labels. – Weigh each can on a balance. (In grams) – Feel free to place them in water to simulate the whitewater experience after spreadsheet is complete. (Keep area dry as wet floors are pose a slipping hazard) – Based on all of your findings, what soda should we bring and why? Use your data! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Soda and Scientific Method – Please find the information to complete the spreadsheet from the soda can labels. – Weigh each can on a balance. (In grams) – Feel free to place them in water to simulate the whitewater experience after spreadsheet is complete. (Keep area dry as wet floors are pose a slipping hazard) – Based on all of your findings, what soda should we bring and why? Use your data! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Soda and Scientific Method – Please find the information to complete the spreadsheet from the soda can labels. – Weigh each can on a balance. (In grams) – Feel free to place them in water to simulate the whitewater experience after spreadsheet is complete. (Keep area dry as wet floors are pose a slipping hazard) – Based on all of your findings, what soda should we bring and why? Use your data. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answers Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • • Answers Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • • Soda and Scientific Method – Determine the density of each soda D= M/V – Mass (g) – Density = ----------------- = _______ g/cm3 – Volume cm3 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • • Which one will float in water? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • • Which one will float in water? Diet Coke Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Brand of Soda Sodium Calories Sugar Mass Volume. H2O Density Coke 45mg 140 39g 388g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Sunkist 70mg 190 50g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Mt. Dew 65mg 170 46g 387g 375 ml 1.03 g/cm3 Diet Coke 40mg 0 0 370g 375 ml .98 g/cm3 Sprite 60mg 140 38g 380g 375 ml 1.01 g/cm3 375 ml
    • • Answer: The diet soda floats because it has a density of less than 1. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer: The diet soda floats because it has a density of less than 1. – The regular soda sinks because the abundance of sugar increases its density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer: The diet soda floats because it has a density of less than 1. – The regular soda sinks because the abundance of sugar increases its density. – We should bring Diet Coke as it will not sink to the bottom of the river? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer: The diet soda floats because it has a density of less than 1. – The regular soda sinks because the abundance of sugar increases its density. – We should bring Diet Coke as it will not sink to the bottom of the river? – Any objections or other considerations? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Answer: The diet soda floats because it has a density of less than 1. – The regular soda sinks because the abundance of sugar increases its density. – We should bring Diet Coke as it will not sink to the bottom of the river? – Any objections or other considerations? – Should we bring Mtn. Dew? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Video Link! (Optional) Mtn. Dew Mouth. – How Mtn. Dew and other sodas can cause serious tooth decay if misused. – http://www.mefeedia.com/video/14377911 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! CSI Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! CSI – You will visit a crime scene. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! CSI – You will visit a crime scene. – Sketch out the scene focusing on all of your observations. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! CSI – You will visit a crime scene. – Sketch out the scene focusing on all of your observations. – Create a hypothesis (educated guess) of what happened based on your observations. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! CSI – You will visit a crime scene. – Sketch out the scene focusing on all of your observations. – Create a hypothesis (educated guess) of what happened based on your observations. – Draw a conclusion based on evidence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! (Optional) Times Have Changed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity Sheet Available, Times have changed, Trials, Average. – Variance and Standard Deviation Extension
    • • Note- The learning today will only partly be about variations in sound.
    • • Note- The learning today will only partly be about variations in sound. – Learning how to conduct trials is an important skill that will occur in this activity.
    • • We must use the scientific method to gather empirical and measurable evidence.
    • • We must use the scientific method to gather empirical and measurable evidence. – The sample size should be large.
    • • We must use the scientific method to gather empirical and measurable evidence. – The sample size should be large. – Random sampling techniques should be used.
    • • We must use the scientific method to gather empirical and measurable evidence. – The sample size should be large. – Random sampling techniques should be used. – All biases should be avoided and poorly collected data should be thrown out.
    • • Please create the following spreadsheet. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Trials Old New 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Trials Old New
    • • Please create the following spreadsheet. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Trials Old New 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10Trials Old New
    • • Problem: Can you determine an old penny from a new penny by the sound it makes when dropped?
    • • Problem: Can you determine an old penny from a new penny by the sound it makes when dropped? – Old = Made before 1982 – New = Made after 1982
    • • Problem: Can you determine an old penny from a new penny by the sound it makes when dropped? – Old = Made before 1982 – New = Made after 1982
    • • Activity! (Optional) Times Have Changed. – Pennies have changed in composition over the years. (Background Information) • 1793–1857 100% copper • 1857–1864 88% copper, 12% nickel • 1864–1962 bronze (95% copper, 5% tin and zinc) • 1943 zinc-coated steel • 1944–1946 brass (95% copper, 5% zinc) • 1962–1982 brass (95% copper, 5% zinc) • 1982–present 97.5% zinc, 2.5% copper
    • • Activity! (Optional) Times Have Changed. – Pennies have changed in composition over the years. (Background Information) • 1793–1857 100% copper • 1857–1864 88% copper, 12% nickel • 1864–1962 bronze (95% copper, 5% tin and zinc) • 1943 zinc-coated steel • 1944–1946 brass (95% copper, 5% zinc) • 1962–1982 brass (95% copper, 5% zinc) • 1982–present 97.5% zinc, 2.5% copper
    • • Make an educated guess called a hypothesis for the problem. – Problem: Can you determine an old penny from a new penny by the sound it makes when dropped?
    • • Please drop an old penny and a new penny 15 times each from a height of 30 cm onto a hard surface and listen to the sound it makes.
    • • Example of tester organizing trials. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Old Old Old Old Old New New New New New Trials Old New
    • • Activity! Times Have Changed – Choose a partner for this project that was not next to you during random order collection. – Keep your random test order hidden from your new partner / listener. – Listener should keep eyes closed during each drop and until pennies have been collected. • Old and new pennies look differently. – Tester and listener must communicate for each drop. Tester says “dropping” and listener says “drop away.” Listener can open eyes when tester says pennies have been collected and mark their guess on the listener spreadsheet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Problem: Can you determine an old penny from a new penny by the sound it makes when dropped? –Score your own sheet • (10 pts for correct response) –Gather the entire classes scores to obtain average / mean. • Add all of the scores and divide by the number of students. – What was the average grade / mean (%) • Do our results answer the problem?
    • • Continuation (Optional) Finding standard deviation and variance. – Standard variation is the square root on the variance. – Variance: The average of the squared differences from the mean.
    • • Statistical Methods – The mean / average was… – Everyone calculate how far away their data was from the mean / average. • Ex.) The mean was 80 and I got 60 so I was 20 from the mean. – To calculate the variance, take each difference, square it, and then average the result as a class. • Ex) 22 + 4.52 + 1.52 + 3.52 + (rest of class) Divide by total # of students = variance
    • • The Standard Deviation is just the square root of the Variance. – So square the variance that we found. Example… 6523 = 80.76% We now have a standard to show which scores are high and low and to help answer our problem.
    • • The Standard Deviation is just the square root of the Variance. – So square the variance that we found. Example… 6523 = 80.76% We now have a standard to show which scores are high and low and to help answer our problem. Standard Deviation and Variance. Learn more at… http://www.mathsisfun.com/data/standard-deviation.html
    • • Stand Deviation Calculator: – Did we calculate correctly? – http://www.mathsisfun.com/data/standard- deviation-calculator.html
    • • Remember to use, and encourage others to use the Metric System! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • You should be very close to completion of your bundle.
    • • You can now add information to the white spaces around the following. – You can also color the sketches and text.
    • Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size. King Henry Died While Drinking Chocolate Milk
    • Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size. King Henry Died While Drinking Chocolate Milk
    • Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size. King Henry Died While Drinking Chocolate Milk A study of natural phenomenon. A systematic study and method. Knowledge through experience.
    • Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size. King Henry Died While Drinking Chocolate Milk A study of natural phenomenon. A systematic study and method. Knowledge through experience.
    • Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size. King Henry Died While Drinking Chocolate Milk A study of natural phenomenon. A systematic study and method. Knowledge through experience. Is safe! Is accurate, precise and methodical. Is unbiased, a seeker of the truth. Can observe and question. Can find solutions, reasons, and research. Works in all weather conditions if safe. Can overcome obstacles. Collaborates (talks) with others.
    • Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size. King Henry Died While Drinking Chocolate Milk A study of natural phenomenon. A systematic study and method. Knowledge through experience. Is safe! Is accurate, precise and methodical. Is unbiased, a seeker of the truth. Can observe and question. Can find solutions, reasons, and research. Works in all weather conditions if safe. Can overcome obstacles. Collaborates (talks) with others.
    • Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size. King Henry Died While Drinking Chocolate Milk A study of natural phenomenon. A systematic study and method. Knowledge through experience. Is safe! Is accurate, precise and methodical. Is unbiased, a seeker of the truth. Can observe and question. Can find solutions, reasons, and research. Works in all weather conditions if safe. Can overcome obstacles. Collaborates (talks) with others. A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry questioning and understanding.
    • Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size. King Henry Died While Drinking Chocolate Milk A study of natural phenomenon. A systematic study and method. Knowledge through experience. Is safe! Is accurate, precise and methodical. Is unbiased, a seeker of the truth. Can observe and question. Can find solutions, reasons, and research. Works in all weather conditions if safe. Can overcome obstacles. Collaborates (talks) with others. A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry questioning and understanding.
    • Magnification: The act of expanding something in apparent size. King Henry Died While Drinking Chocolate Milk A study of natural phenomenon. A systematic study and method. Knowledge through experience. Is safe! Is accurate, precise and methodical. Is unbiased, a seeker of the truth. Can observe and question. Can find solutions, reasons, and research. Works in all weather conditions if safe. Can overcome obstacles. Collaborates (talks) with others. A process that is the basis for scientific inquiry questioning and understanding.
    • • Activity! Science Skills Unit Review Game Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • Activity! (Optional) Making Goop / Time to show me your science skills. – Available Sheet
    • • Activity! (Optional) Making Goop • Directions in video and on next slide. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48- DU0kQtPg
    • • Materials – Glue bottle (4oz) – 2 mixing bowls – Water – Mixing spoon – Measuring Cups – Borax – Measuring spoon – Sealable Bag
    • • Procedure: – 1.) Squeeze glue into bowl. – 2.) Fill glue bottle with water, cap, mix, and pour into the glue in bowl. – 3.) Stir and add desired food coloring. – 4.) Set that bowl aside. – 5.) In new bowl mix 1 cup of water with 1 tablespoon of borax and stir. – 6.) Add 1/3 a cup of borax and water mixture into a bowl and stir. – 7.) Slowly add the contents from the glue bowl into the borax bowl while you stir. – 8.) Pick up goop and work it with your hands. Put in plastic bag and clean up area. – 9.)Once area is clean you can play with goop.
    • • Goop is a polymer you can make from white glue and borax. – Borax is a cleaning agent and natural mineral composed of sodium, boron, oxygen and water. – The Elmer’s glue is a long-chained polymer (Poly Vinyl Acetate), meaning it is a set of molecules that are linked together in a long chain. – When added together, the borate ions bond with water molecules. These long polymers link together to form a matrix that is not very strong. – This why goop is stretchable and considered a Non-Newtonian Fluid. High Viscosity.
    • • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tst Please visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet
    • • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to and NSTA) • http://www.sciencedaily.com/ • http://www.sciencemag.org/ • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
    • • More Units Available at… Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and the Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
    • • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/
    • Areas of Focus within The Science Skills Unit: Lab Safety, Lab Safety Equipment, Magnification, Microscopes, Stereoscopes, Hand Lenses, Electron Microscopes, Compound Light Microscopes, Parts of a Compound Microscope, Metric System, International System of Units, Scientific Notation, Base Units, Mass, Volume, Density, Temperature, Time, Other SI Units, Observation, Inferences, Scientific Method, What is Science? What makes a good scientist? Types of Scientists, Branches of Science, Scientific Method, Hypothesis, Observations, Inferences. Hundreds of PowerPoint samples, the bundled homework package, unit notes, and much more can be previewed at… http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html
    • • This PowerPoint is on small part of my Science Skills Unit. This unit includes… • A Four Part 2,000+ Slide PowerPoint presentation full of class activities, review opportunities, project ideas, video linksm discussion questions, and much more. • 16 page bundled homework package that chronologically follows the PowerPoint slideshow. Modified version provided. • Worksheets, curriculum guide, Common Core worksheet. • 15 pages of unit notes with visuals for students who require assistance and support staff. • Many video and academic links • 1 PowerPoint review game with answer key. • Flashcards, rubrics, activity sheets, and much more. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Me tric_Methods.html
    • • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
    • Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
    • • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
    • http://www.teacherspaytea chers.com/Product/Physical -Science-Curriculum- 596485 http://www.teacherspayt eachers.com/Product/Life -Science-Curriculum- 601267 http://www.teacherspayt eachers.com/Product/Eart h-Science-Curriculum- 590950
    • • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/